Got Nature? Blog

Asian ant confirmed in Indiana.

Asian needle ant in
natural setting. Photo by Kevin Weiner, Evansville, IN.

It is official. The Asian needle ant is our newest invasive insect pest and has now become a permanent resident, stinging ant. Two ant specimens taken from a wooded area in southern Indiana by an astute amateur entomologist, who observed their appearance and behavior as ‘out of the ordinary’, were submitted to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and to the Purdue University Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory for species identification in February, 2022. Both were confirmed to be Formicidae: Brachyponera chinensis, commonly known as the Asian needle ant, not previously recorded from Indiana.

Asian needle ants (ANAs), originally from Eastern Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), were first discovered in the United States in the early 1930s, but only recognized as a pest since 2006. They have been officially established in several states in the U.S. including North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama and Georgia and, have been anecdotally reported as far north and west as New York, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Note that stings to humans will be moderately painful (potentially causing severe allergic reactions to susceptible individuals) much like fire ant or bee stings, but fortunately because these ants are much less aggressive in protecting their nests, the number of stings per encounter will be less.

The First Report of the Invasive Asian Needle Ant in Indiana pdf provides more details on their identification and biology.

Asian ant stinger, now seen in Indiana.

Asian needle ant stinger extended. Photo by Kevin Weiner, Evansville, IN.

If you want to confirm a sighting of the Asian needle ant please contact the Purdue University Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory at this time. More information will be presented as experts monitor the spread.

Resources:
Thousand Cankers Disease, collaborative website
Thousand Cankers Disease, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Thousand Cankers Disease: Indiana Walnut Trees Threatened, Purdue Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory
Indiana Walnut Council
Spotted lanternfly: Everything You Need to Know in 30 Minutes, Video, Emerald Ash Borer University
Emerald Ash Borer, EAB Information Network
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Woodland Management Moment: Invasive Species Control Process, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Report Invasive
Indiana Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology

Tim Gibb, Insect Diagnostician and Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Entomology 


Posted on May 10th, 2022 in Alert, How To, Wildlife | No Comments »

Bird on tree limb with blooms. Publication Breeding Birds HEE, FNR-501-W.Question: Is there any risk of becoming infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus by feeding backyard birds or cleaning a bird feeder?

Answer: There is currently no evidence that suggests you could become infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus by feeding backyard birds. Generally, songbirds, or perching birds, (Passeriformes) are the primary type of birds at feeders, and they are usually not affected by HPAI. Most wild birds traditionally associated with avian influenza viruses are waterfowl, shorebirds and scavengers. It is unlikely that bird feeders will contribute to an outbreak among songbirds, but if someone also has backyard poultry, then we recommend removing bird feeders during the outbreak. Songbirds are susceptible to other avian diseases. Therefore, we recommend that people without backyard poultry who feed birds routinely, clean their feeders and bird baths, and anyone who comes in direct contact with bird droppings should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water.

Additional information:
Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IN DNR) – Fish and Wildlife, Avian Flu: What is the risk to people? Very few types of AI can infect humans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from AI viruses to be low. To date, no human AI infections have been detected in the United States. The U.S. has a strong AIV surveillance program that has been in place for many years.

Cornell Bird Lab: Avian Influenza Outbreak: Should You Take Down Your Bird Feeders?

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources: Is there any risk of becoming infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus by feeding backyard birds or cleaning a bird feeder?

Resources:
The National Audubon Society
Birds and Residential Window Strikes: Tips for Prevention, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
Putting a Little Wildlife in Your Backyard This Spring, The Education Store
It’s For the Birds, Indiana Yard and Garden-Purdue Consumer Horticulture
Managing Woodlands for Birds Video, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Brian MacGowan, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


Storm damage, trees downSafety first! Stay clear and look for dangerous hanging limbs, broken branches and other failures before beginning cleanup or inspections. Keep others clear of the areas beneath and around damaged trees. Be alert for power lines that could be involved with damaged trees. All utility lines should be considered energized and dangerous.

Lindsey Purcell, Purdue urban forestry specialist, shares, “in my experience, during storm cleanup, many tree owners are faced with the decision of what to do with their trees relative to restoration or removal”.  There are several types of tree damage that occur from violent weather. Each has its own specific assessment considerations. All parts of the tree should be inspected during a post-storm assessment. This requires the expertise of trained, professional arborists to assist with the decision making regarding the best course of action. Unfortunately, there are those who take advantage of the situation and overcharge or provide poor advice when it comes to the best decision on their trees. Don’t make any hasty decisions and be sure you are hiring an International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Certified Arborist, ask for references and proof of insurance in the process. To find an arborist near you, verify credentials and to find more information on trees view video: Find an Arborist, Trees are Good, ISA.

View publication Trees and Storms located in The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center, for more information.

Resources:
Find an Arborist website, Trees are Good, International Society of Arboriculture (ISA)
Caring for storm-damaged trees/How to Acidify Soil in the Yard – In the Grow, Purdue Extension
Moist soil and rotten roots makes it easy for trees to come crashing down – Fox 59 News
Why Is My Tree Dying? – The Education Store
Tree Risk Management – The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment – The Education Store
Trees and Electric Lines – The Education Store

Lindsey Purcell, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Environmental Planning in Community Plans

Indiana communities use several kinds of plans to help guide decisions about development, quality of life, and public safety. Comprehensive plans, parks and recreation plans, multi-hazard mitigation plans, and sub-area plans are conducted by local governments for these purposes. This Environmental Planning in Community Plan include opportunities for addressing environmental concerns. This document provides examples of the connection between each type of plan and environmental planning, along with instructive examples from Indiana communities.

Although this document focuses on the connection between local government and watershed plans and their connections to environmental planning, several state and federal regulatory agencies also impact environmental planning. Some of the major agencies are discussed in this publication, and links to additional resources are provided.

Communities create comprehensive plans to guide decisions about development, quality of life and public safety, parks and recreation plans, multi-hazard mitigation plans, and sub-area plans. Such plans include opportunities to address environmental concerns. Using instructive examples from Indiana communities, this publication examines the connection between those plans and environmental planning.

Resources:
Sustainable Communities Extension Program Website, Purdue Extension
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces Program Video, Purdue Extension
Implementation Examples of Smart Growth Strategies in Indiana, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Climate Change and Sustainable Development, The Education Store
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities, The Education Store
Subscribe to Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Dan Walker, Community Planning Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Kara Salazar, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on March 23rd, 2022 in How To, Wildlife | No Comments »

Hummingbirds are a popular attraction in any backyard and we receive questions on when they will be coming to Indiana and how to attract them to your backyard. Our Purdue professor of wildlife ecology Barny Dunning in this interview for CBS4 Indianapolis titled “How to attract hummingbirds during peak migration,” shares how planting a variety of plants that bloom will help draw them in along with a simple hummingbird mixture.

The ruby-throated hummingbird is the only species of hummingbird that nests in the Hoosier state. These colorful visitors are migratory and arrive from their wintering grounds around mid-April.

Dr. Brian MacGowan has a publication that is a great resource to share along with this video showing how to prepare your hummingbird feeders and how to find out when they will be migrating to your area.

Resources:
Attracting Hummingbirds to Your Yard publication, The Education Store-Purdue Extension resource center
Preventing Wildlife Damage – Do You Need a Permit?, The Education Store
Selecting a Nuisance Wildlife Control Professional, The Education Store
How to Construct a Scent Station video, The Education Store
Question: How do I properly relocate raccoons from my attic?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension FNR
Nuisance Wildlife, Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Brian MacGowan, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources’ extension efforts over the past two years amidst the COVID-19 pandemic were recognized in the Purdue Extension Specialist Quarterly newsletter (pdf).

Ask an Expert Zoom screen shot as extension specialists share resources and answer questions regarding wildlife, forestry, community planning and invasive species.The transition to virtual content brought expertise across subject matter areas, ranging from forestry and wildlife, to aquatic sciences and entomology, to the masses in the form of several video series which collectively earned nearly 150,000 views.

The FNR Extension team included: Jay Beugly, Jarred Brooke, Nick Burgmeier, Barny Dunning, Diana Evans, Lenny Farlee, Jason Hoverman, Liz Jackson, Brian MacGowan, Patrick McGovern, Wendy Mayer, Charlotte Owings, Lindsey Purcell, Bee Redfield, Shelby Royal, Bob Rode, Kara Salazar, Mike Saunders, Amy Shambach, Rod Williams, Mitch Zischke, as well as frequent Entomology contributors: Elizabeth Barnes, Cliff Sadof.

The feature in the fourth quarter newsletter begins:
“While Covid caused limitations on travel and in-person events nationwide, across Indiana, many were spending more time in outdoor recreational activities, hiking, bird-watching, hunting and fishing, or managing natural resources properties. Adjusting to the pandemic, the FNR team created an innovative and team-oriented instruction approach through skill-building in video production with coordinated connection and crosspromotion of resources.

“Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) faculty, specialists, staff, and students, with invited partners across research and Extension, delivered 45-minute Ask an Expert Facebook Live programs for 35 weeks. Programs covered many FNR specialties: Animals & Insects (bats, bird, cicadas, coyotes, deer, fish, frogs, hellbenders, moles, pollinators, salamanders, snakes, toads, turtles, and wood pests); Plants & Ecosystems (invasive plant species, hardwood ecosystems, native grasses for wildlife, conservation tree planting, rainscaping, fall food plots, and selecting, planting and inspecting trees); and Management & Operations (prescribed fires, aquatic plant and pond management, and fish and wildlife management).

Read the full Purdue Extension Specialist Quarterly Highlight (pdf).

Resources:
Ask An Expert Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
ID That Tree Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Wildlife Habitat Hint Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Subscribe to the Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Diana Evans, Extension and Web Communication Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on March 4th, 2022 in Forestry, How To, Land Use, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Frost seeding is a great way to establish native grasses and forbs for soil and water conservation and to create habitat for various wildlife and pollinators. You can use multiple tools for frost seeding, such as a tractor or ATV and broadcast spreader or a hand “whirlybird” seed spreader. But one innovative way to broadcast the seed is with a drone – or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).

A drone is the tool we used to frost seed native grasses and forbs as part of a project on the Ivy Tech Community College-Lafayette Campus.

The Project
Mound created from soil leftover after diggin a nearby retention pond. Jarred Brooke, FNR extension specialist, frost seeding native grasses and forbs with drone.Faculty and staff within the Agriculture Program at Ivy Tech Community College received a grant from the Wabash River Enhancement Corporation (WREC) to plant native grasses and forbs on their property for educational and demonstration opportunities.

We planted a 4-acre mound created from soil leftover after digging a nearby retention pond. The topography and slopes of the mound made using traditional planting equipment like a tractor and no-till drill a challenge. And since the Ivy Tech staff was already familiar with using drones to plant cover crops, they decided it would be the best option to seed the mound.

The Indiana Natural Resources Conservation Service State Biologist created the seed mix we used. The mix included a diverse blend of native warm-season grasses and forbs.

Drone set up.Purdue Extension and Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources assisted in the project by supplying, calibrating, and flying the drone, sharing previous experiences with frost seeding native grasses and forbs, and adjusting the seed mix by adding a carrier to improve seed flow through the drone seed spreader.

The Drone Set-up
We used a DJI Agras MG-1P drone fitted with a seed hopper that could be filled with up to 22 pounds of seed. Once filled, the drone spreads the seed at a specific rate (pounds per acre) by flying a consistent speed and height across the field along a predetermined path. A hand-held controller allows you to change the drone’s flight path, speed, and height. The controller also allows you to turn the broadcast spreader on or off, adjust the seed gate opening (% open), and the revolutions/minute of the disc to change the rate of the spreader.

The Process
Mixing the seed
The first step was to ensure the seed would flow through the seed hopper. This drone is set up to spread cover crops, which are usually large, heavy seeds like cereal rye or smaller (but still relatively heavy) seeds like clovers.

Native grasses and forbs are often much smaller and lower in weight by volume than cover crops. The grasses are also “fluffy” or have extra seed parts (chaff or awns), making them prone to clogging. These qualities of native grasses and forbs can present a challenge when trying to broadcast them without specialized equipment. We often add a carrier, like pelletized lime, to add more weight to the seed mix and allow the seed to flow more easily through the spreader. We added 40 pounds of pelletized lime per acre to the seed mix.

Calibrating the drone
We needed to calibrate the drone to spread the right amount of seed per acre. Calibrating a drone is similar to calibrating any broadcasting equipment. We needed to know:

  1. How wide the spreader spreads the seed (swath width)
  2. How fast the drone is flying
  3. How much seed (lbs) is being spread over a specific area

Check out this video for more information about frost seeding and calibrating a broadcast spreader.

Creating the map and programming the drone
After finishing the calibration, we went to the field to create the map for the project and program the drone. The initial step with the drone is to create a boundary layer in the mapping software. We did this by physically taking the controller to the four corners of the mound and setting a GPS point. When the accuracy showed 5 feet or less, we dropped a pin and used that as a corner. Once the corners were marked, the mapping software created the boundaries of the mound and created an automated path for the drone to fly.

Once we completed the map, we filled the drone with seed and set the flight parameters. Our calibration figures showed that we needed a 90% hopper opening with a speed of 2 mph, and we had a swath width of 18 feet from 10 feet above the ground (drone height). The disc speed was set to 900 revolutions per minute.

Spreading the Seed
Once the seed was mixed and the drone was calibrated and programmed, we started spreading the seed. With the drone, this is as easy as filling the seed hopper, starting the drone, and allowing it to fly the planned and automated mission. Once the seed hopper is empty, the drone automatically remembers where it stopped and returns home to be refilled. Once refilled, the drone will return to where it stopped and restarts spreading the seed. This process repeats until the drone has covered the entire field.

The Challenges
Fluffy seeds and seed flow
One of the biggest challenges we encountered was the flow of the native grass seed through the seed hopper. The seed was too fluffy (not enough weight per volume) to flow correctly through the seed hopper. The seed would flow and spread correctly for a few minutes, then the seed would get clogged, and the drone would stop. Because the fluffy seed was getting stuck at the top of the hopper and not flowing correctly, the sensor on the drone’s seed hopper was telling us the seed hopper was empty. However, at least 5-10 pounds of seed was still in the hopper. This would cause the drone to fly back to be refilled. Each time this happened, it cost us time and battery life on the drone.

We were able to free the seed in the hopper and get it to flow correctly by rocking the drone or flying the drone back and forth quickly until the seed worked itself loose. If you were using traditional equipment like a tractor and fertilizer spreader, the bouncing of the tractor over rough terrain would have naturally agitated the seed and allowed it to flow. But, with a drone flying in the air, the seed was not agitated. We would have needed to add more carrier to the seed mix to increase its weight and improve the seed flow.

Broadcast spreaders designed to spread fluffy seeds like native grasses often have an agitator in the hopper to stop the seed from clogging and improve seed flow. The native grass seed would have flowed better through a drone seed spreader explicitly designed for this type of seed, like this aerial spreader.

Batteries and Battery Life
Some of the challenges with drones, in general, are batteries and battery life. We had to change batteries frequently while spreading and recharge the batteries not in use to ensure we had enough battery life to complete the seeding. The challenges we had with the seed flow exacerbated our challenges with batteries because each time we had to check the seed hopper or free the seed, it cost us battery life.

It was helpful that we had six batteries. This allowed us to rotate between using batteries and charging them and meant we didn’t have to stop spreading to wait on batteries to be charged.

Flight speed
Because we added extra weight to the seed mix by using a carrier, we needed to fly the drone at a slow speed to spread at the correct rate per acre. Keeping the drone at a lower speed (2 mph) was challenging. Often the drone flew at around 3 mph. This is likely due to the physical properties of the electric motors turning the propellers to keep the drone aloft.

Drone malfunction
Another challenge we faced was a malfunction on the UAV where the spreader gate was opening and closing on its own, or not opening at all, and had an error showing on the controller screen that the gate was blocked. We noticed this error and worked on the UAV during the calibration phase and thought it was repaired. We had to stop and take the spreader apart again to identify the problem.

On the day we seeded, we finally decided to open the hopper to 90% opening and physically stop the gears from opening and closing. This left the hopper open constantly, but we could still turn the spreader on and off. After finishing the seeding, we determined the issue was either a faulty servo motor or control board. These parts are inexpensive and can be replaced, but they are specialized parts that require ordering and cannot be picked up from a local hardware store.

Cost of the drone
Picture of ground where drone placed native grass and forb seed.The DJI Agras MG-1P is an older model (older, not outdated), so the cost has decreased. Initially this model cost around $19,000, but it is now about $8,000. This includes both attachments for spraying and spreading. Additional batteries are around $700 each. Cost for the newer models of this type of drone range from $18,000 to ~$30,000, depending on the size and payload.

The Results
Despite the challenges we faced, the drone worked well for spreading the native grass and forb seed for this project. We applied the correct amount of seed required for the area. When the seed flowed correctly, it was spread evenly on the site. However, we will need to come back to the site during the next few summers to see how well native grasses and forbs are established.

A drone may not be effective for large-scale conservation plantings because of the time and batteries required, the small hopper size, and the need to refill the seed hopper. But for smaller plantings or those plantings in areas inaccessible by traditional equipment (in wetlands, on steep slopes, woodlands, etc.), drones could be an effective tool to establish native grasses and forbs.

Resources:
Frost Seeding to Establish Wildlife Food Plots & Native Grass and Forb Plantings, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Calibrating a No-Till Drill for Conservation Plantings and Wildlife Food Plots, video, The Education Store
Renovating native warm-season grass stands for wildlife: a land manager’s guide, The Education Store
Creating a Wildlife Habitat Management Plan for Landowners, The Education Store
Purdue Extension Pond and Wildlife Management Website, Purdue Extension

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources

John Scott, Purdue Extension Coordinator of Digital Agriculture
College of Agriculture


Posted on March 4th, 2022 in How To, Natural Resource Planning, Wildlife | No Comments »

Jarred Brooke teaching at outside workshop regarding planting native grasslands for wildlife and pollinators.Jarred Brooke, wildlife extension specialist, was featured in the April 2022 Agriculture & Natural Resources (ANR) newsletter. Jarred continues to share workshops and resources for the state of Indiana and beyond, with topics including prescribed fire, planting native grasslands, habitat management, wildlife management for landowners, utilizing drones and much more.

ANR Newsletter April 2022: Featured Extension Specialist – Jarred Brooke
What do 79% of Indiana woodland owners have in common? They agree providing wildlife habitat is an important reason they own land – making it the 2nd most common reason for owning a woodland, according to a 2018 national survey. And more than just woodland owners are interested in wildlife. Many agriculture producers are keenly interested in wildlife conservation. Jarred Brooke has built his extension program around this idea – wildlife are important to private landowners, and private landowners are important to wildlife.

Habitat Management Education Through Experiential Learning
Embracing the “Learn by Doing” approach of 4-H, Jarred is involved in several wildlife habitat management workshops and field days emphasizing experiential learning opportunities. These range from forestry and wildlife field tours to live prescribed fire demonstrations. One such program is the “Learn-N-Burn” workshops.

Jarred has partnered with Extension Educators and Specialists, Soil and Water Conservation Districts, and Indiana DNR and Pheasants Forever Biologists to host workshops to help landowners understand the importance of prescribed fire in managing grasslands and woodlands. Participants are treated to a live prescribed fire demonstration during the workshop (weather permitting). Attendees of these workshops own or manage more than 23,000 acres, their knowledge about prescribed fire increased from 37-125%, and 94% of attendees agreed the workshops helped them make decisions on their property.

Moving Natural Resources Extension Digital
Jarred has also been involved in several projects to create digital extension resources. This includes being part of an Issue-Based Action Team that published multiple pond and wildlife management publications, videos, created a pond and wildlife management website, and a tool to help landowners find natural resource professionals in their county. He is also part of a team that helped develop the Purdue FNR Ask-the-Expert Facebook Live program, which has received more than 28,000 views.

Taking to the airwaves, Jarred is part of the multi-state team that created the Natural Resources University (NRU) Podcast Network. He co-hosts the Habitat University podcast with the Extension Wildlife Specialist at Iowa State University. NRU podcasts have received 123,000 downloads in 50 states and 63 countries. A survey of Habitat University listeners indicated they plan to apply or have applied information from the podcast to over 19,000 acres of land.

Train-the-Trainer: Reaching Private Landowners Through Conservation Partnerships
Jarred collaborates with other FNR Extension Specialists and Indiana conservation partners to deliver conservation training programs. These programs are aimed at helping natural resources professionals deliver conservation programs like the Conservation Reserve Program. For example, Jarred works with the Natural Resources Conservation Service to create and provide native grass establishment and management trainings. Jarred helped develop six of these workshops for 164 professionals. More than 95% of participants agreed their future native grass establishment and management recommendations would improve after attending these workshops.

Jarred’s extension efforts aim to help landowners become better stewards of Indiana’s wildlife resources by helping them acquire the knowledge to make sound decisions on their property.

View full ANR Newsletter.

Resources:
Frost Seeding to Establish Wildlife Food Plots & Native Grass and Forb Plantings, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Calibrating a No-Till Drill for Conservation Plantings and Wildlife Food Plots, video, The Education Store
Renovating native warm-season grass stands for wildlife: a land manager’s guide, The Education Store
Creating a Wildlife Habitat Management Plan for Landowners, The Education Store
Purdue Extension Pond and Wildlife Management Website, Purdue Extension
Subscribe: Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel, Includes videos: Ask an Expert-Prescribed Fire, Ask an Expert-Handling Harvested Deer and more
Upcoming Purdue Extension-FNR Events, Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)

Henry Quesada, FNR Professor, Assistant Directory of Extension and ANR Program Leader
Purdue Extension

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources

 


Posted on March 3rd, 2022 in How To, Wildlife | No Comments »
Turkey

Source: USFWS

MyDNR Newsletter, Indiana Department of Forestry and Natural Resources (IDNR): Spring turkey season starts in April. Are you ready? If you’re interested in hunting turkey, but not sure how to do it, join us for a free workshop:

March 19th – Learn to Hunt: Turkey
Glenns Valley Conservation Club
7100 Waverly Road
Martinsville, IN 46151

Topics will include:

  • Hunter and Gun Safety
  • Hunting Rules and regulations
  • Introduction to the National Wild Turkey Federation
  • Turkey hunting equipment
  • Methods and strategies for Turkey hunting
  • Turkey calling
  • Where to hunt

For other hunting and trapping dates view the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Fish and Wildlife Department website and view the Hunting & Trapping Guide.

For the latest news and events happening at your favorite state park, subscribe to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources-MyDNR newsletter or receive the Wild Bulletin newsletter from the Division of Fish & Wildlife.

Other Resources:
Ask an Expert: Wildlife Food Plots, video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Wildlife Habitat Hint, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
How to Construct a Scent Station, The Education Store
Help Us Keep Wildlife Wild, Got Nature? Blog
Wildlife, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel

Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)


Young forest growth, Young Forest video series, U.S. Forest Service.What do whip-poor-wills, woodcock, bobcats, and box turtles have in common? All these species make their home in young forests. But, what is a young forest? And what do young forests look like?

This new video series from the Hoosier National Forest helps shed some light on these questions and more.

Specialists representing a diversity of organizations (American Bird Conservancy, Purdue Extension, National Wild Turkey Federation, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service) discuss the importance of young forest as habitat for a wide variety of wildlife, managing young forests and misconceptions about young forest.

Student walking through new young forest, Young Forest video series, U.S. Forest Service.U.S. Forest Service Vimeo Young Forest Videos:

Other resources:
Harvesting our forests, the wildlife debate, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) Got Nature? Blog
Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
Young Forest Video series, U.S. Forest Service.Forest Management for Reptiles and Amphibians: A Technical Guide for the Midwest, The Education Store
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Forest Birds , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Managing Woodlands for Birds , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Sustaining Our Oak-Hickory Forests , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Ask the Expert: Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Birds and Salamander Research, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Breeding Birds, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Small Mammals, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Salamanders, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Moths, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Bats, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment: How the HEE Came to Be, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment publications , Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment (HEE) website
New Videos Stress Importance of Young Forests, Purdue News – Forestry and Natural Resources

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


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