Got Nature? Blog

Grass and soil, showing seedling coming up in soil.

Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Lawn to Lake Midwest is a great resource as the experts share each month care tips on how to have a healthy lawn all year long while using natural lawn care practices. For the month of May check out the things to watch out for and why testing your soil is important.

You will also find resources for more options for a sustainable lawn:

  • Take the Natural Lawn Care Quiz and see where you are at with  your lawn care practices.
  • Take a look at some simply ways to imcorporate more natural lawn care practices.
  • If you’re ready, jump into the weeds to explore even more sustainable lawn management practices.
  • Find asnwers to commonly asked lawn care questions.

Resources:
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Turfgrass Science, Department of Horticulture & Landscape Architecture
Turfgrass Insect Management, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 1: Choosing a Tree, Video, The Education Store
Purdue Turf Doctor app for Apple iOS, Apple App Store

Lawn to Lake Midwest

Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)


Posted on May 3rd, 2022 in Forestry, Land Use, Wildlife | No Comments »

Great American Rail Trail snakes through northwest to eastern IndianaMyDNR Newsletter, Indiana Department of Forestry and Natural Resources: Gov. Eric J. Holcomb and DNR Director Dan Bortner recently announced 38 communities and non-profit organizations will receive a combined $65 million for 77 miles of new trail development.

“Trails connect communities together in such a personal way and are perfect pathways to good mental and physical well-being,” Gov. Holcomb said.

A $150 million grant program, Next Level Trails is the largest infusion of trails funding in state history. In rounds one and two, a total of $55 million was awarded to 35 communities. To date, $120 million has been awarded to build 190 miles of trails throughout Indiana. Ninety-four percent of Hoosiers live within five miles of a trail.

The grants awarded in the third round include 17 regional projects and 21 local projects. The list of awards, project descriptions, and a map are posted at on.IN.gov/NLT-round-3.

Full article>>>

To read other news articles visit Indiana Department of forestry and Natural Resources website.

Resources:
Enhancing The Value of Public Spaces, Purdue Extension Forestry and Natural Resources
Enhancing The Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Fun Trail Event Days, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Healthy and Wellness Videos, The Nature of Teaching YouTube Channel
Benefits of Connecting with Nature,  The Education Store

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


Posted on March 4th, 2022 in Forestry, How To, Land Use, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Frost seeding is a great way to establish native grasses and forbs for soil and water conservation and to create habitat for various wildlife and pollinators. You can use multiple tools for frost seeding, such as a tractor or ATV and broadcast spreader or a hand “whirlybird” seed spreader. But one innovative way to broadcast the seed is with a drone – or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).

A drone is the tool we used to frost seed native grasses and forbs as part of a project on the Ivy Tech Community College-Lafayette Campus.

The Project
Mound created from soil leftover after diggin a nearby retention pond. Jarred Brooke, FNR extension specialist, frost seeding native grasses and forbs with drone.Faculty and staff within the Agriculture Program at Ivy Tech Community College received a grant from the Wabash River Enhancement Corporation (WREC) to plant native grasses and forbs on their property for educational and demonstration opportunities.

We planted a 4-acre mound created from soil leftover after digging a nearby retention pond. The topography and slopes of the mound made using traditional planting equipment like a tractor and no-till drill a challenge. And since the Ivy Tech staff was already familiar with using drones to plant cover crops, they decided it would be the best option to seed the mound.

The Indiana Natural Resources Conservation Service State Biologist created the seed mix we used. The mix included a diverse blend of native warm-season grasses and forbs.

Drone set up.Purdue Extension and Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources assisted in the project by supplying, calibrating, and flying the drone, sharing previous experiences with frost seeding native grasses and forbs, and adjusting the seed mix by adding a carrier to improve seed flow through the drone seed spreader.

The Drone Set-up
We used a DJI Agras MG-1P drone fitted with a seed hopper that could be filled with up to 22 pounds of seed. Once filled, the drone spreads the seed at a specific rate (pounds per acre) by flying a consistent speed and height across the field along a predetermined path. A hand-held controller allows you to change the drone’s flight path, speed, and height. The controller also allows you to turn the broadcast spreader on or off, adjust the seed gate opening (% open), and the revolutions/minute of the disc to change the rate of the spreader.

The Process
Mixing the seed
The first step was to ensure the seed would flow through the seed hopper. This drone is set up to spread cover crops, which are usually large, heavy seeds like cereal rye or smaller (but still relatively heavy) seeds like clovers.

Native grasses and forbs are often much smaller and lower in weight by volume than cover crops. The grasses are also “fluffy” or have extra seed parts (chaff or awns), making them prone to clogging. These qualities of native grasses and forbs can present a challenge when trying to broadcast them without specialized equipment. We often add a carrier, like pelletized lime, to add more weight to the seed mix and allow the seed to flow more easily through the spreader. We added 40 pounds of pelletized lime per acre to the seed mix.

Calibrating the drone
We needed to calibrate the drone to spread the right amount of seed per acre. Calibrating a drone is similar to calibrating any broadcasting equipment. We needed to know:

  1. How wide the spreader spreads the seed (swath width)
  2. How fast the drone is flying
  3. How much seed (lbs) is being spread over a specific area

Check out this video for more information about frost seeding and calibrating a broadcast spreader.

Creating the map and programming the drone
After finishing the calibration, we went to the field to create the map for the project and program the drone. The initial step with the drone is to create a boundary layer in the mapping software. We did this by physically taking the controller to the four corners of the mound and setting a GPS point. When the accuracy showed 5 feet or less, we dropped a pin and used that as a corner. Once the corners were marked, the mapping software created the boundaries of the mound and created an automated path for the drone to fly.

Once we completed the map, we filled the drone with seed and set the flight parameters. Our calibration figures showed that we needed a 90% hopper opening with a speed of 2 mph, and we had a swath width of 18 feet from 10 feet above the ground (drone height). The disc speed was set to 900 revolutions per minute.

Spreading the Seed
Once the seed was mixed and the drone was calibrated and programmed, we started spreading the seed. With the drone, this is as easy as filling the seed hopper, starting the drone, and allowing it to fly the planned and automated mission. Once the seed hopper is empty, the drone automatically remembers where it stopped and returns home to be refilled. Once refilled, the drone will return to where it stopped and restarts spreading the seed. This process repeats until the drone has covered the entire field.

The Challenges
Fluffy seeds and seed flow
One of the biggest challenges we encountered was the flow of the native grass seed through the seed hopper. The seed was too fluffy (not enough weight per volume) to flow correctly through the seed hopper. The seed would flow and spread correctly for a few minutes, then the seed would get clogged, and the drone would stop. Because the fluffy seed was getting stuck at the top of the hopper and not flowing correctly, the sensor on the drone’s seed hopper was telling us the seed hopper was empty. However, at least 5-10 pounds of seed was still in the hopper. This would cause the drone to fly back to be refilled. Each time this happened, it cost us time and battery life on the drone.

We were able to free the seed in the hopper and get it to flow correctly by rocking the drone or flying the drone back and forth quickly until the seed worked itself loose. If you were using traditional equipment like a tractor and fertilizer spreader, the bouncing of the tractor over rough terrain would have naturally agitated the seed and allowed it to flow. But, with a drone flying in the air, the seed was not agitated. We would have needed to add more carrier to the seed mix to increase its weight and improve the seed flow.

Broadcast spreaders designed to spread fluffy seeds like native grasses often have an agitator in the hopper to stop the seed from clogging and improve seed flow. The native grass seed would have flowed better through a drone seed spreader explicitly designed for this type of seed, like this aerial spreader.

Batteries and Battery Life
Some of the challenges with drones, in general, are batteries and battery life. We had to change batteries frequently while spreading and recharge the batteries not in use to ensure we had enough battery life to complete the seeding. The challenges we had with the seed flow exacerbated our challenges with batteries because each time we had to check the seed hopper or free the seed, it cost us battery life.

It was helpful that we had six batteries. This allowed us to rotate between using batteries and charging them and meant we didn’t have to stop spreading to wait on batteries to be charged.

Flight speed
Because we added extra weight to the seed mix by using a carrier, we needed to fly the drone at a slow speed to spread at the correct rate per acre. Keeping the drone at a lower speed (2 mph) was challenging. Often the drone flew at around 3 mph. This is likely due to the physical properties of the electric motors turning the propellers to keep the drone aloft.

Drone malfunction
Another challenge we faced was a malfunction on the UAV where the spreader gate was opening and closing on its own, or not opening at all, and had an error showing on the controller screen that the gate was blocked. We noticed this error and worked on the UAV during the calibration phase and thought it was repaired. We had to stop and take the spreader apart again to identify the problem.

On the day we seeded, we finally decided to open the hopper to 90% opening and physically stop the gears from opening and closing. This left the hopper open constantly, but we could still turn the spreader on and off. After finishing the seeding, we determined the issue was either a faulty servo motor or control board. These parts are inexpensive and can be replaced, but they are specialized parts that require ordering and cannot be picked up from a local hardware store.

Cost of the drone
Picture of ground where drone placed native grass and forb seed.The DJI Agras MG-1P is an older model (older, not outdated), so the cost has decreased. Initially this model cost around $19,000, but it is now about $8,000. This includes both attachments for spraying and spreading. Additional batteries are around $700 each. Cost for the newer models of this type of drone range from $18,000 to ~$30,000, depending on the size and payload.

The Results
Despite the challenges we faced, the drone worked well for spreading the native grass and forb seed for this project. We applied the correct amount of seed required for the area. When the seed flowed correctly, it was spread evenly on the site. However, we will need to come back to the site during the next few summers to see how well native grasses and forbs are established.

A drone may not be effective for large-scale conservation plantings because of the time and batteries required, the small hopper size, and the need to refill the seed hopper. But for smaller plantings or those plantings in areas inaccessible by traditional equipment (in wetlands, on steep slopes, woodlands, etc.), drones could be an effective tool to establish native grasses and forbs.

Resources:
Frost Seeding to Establish Wildlife Food Plots & Native Grass and Forb Plantings, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Calibrating a No-Till Drill for Conservation Plantings and Wildlife Food Plots, video, The Education Store
Renovating native warm-season grass stands for wildlife: a land manager’s guide, The Education Store
Creating a Wildlife Habitat Management Plan for Landowners, The Education Store
Purdue Extension Pond and Wildlife Management Website, Purdue Extension

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources

John Scott, Purdue Extension Coordinator of Digital Agriculture
College of Agriculture


Young forest growth, Young Forest video series, U.S. Forest Service.What do whip-poor-wills, woodcock, bobcats, and box turtles have in common? All these species make their home in young forests. But, what is a young forest? And what do young forests look like?

This new video series from the Hoosier National Forest helps shed some light on these questions and more.

Specialists representing a diversity of organizations (American Bird Conservancy, Purdue Extension, National Wild Turkey Federation, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service) discuss the importance of young forest as habitat for a wide variety of wildlife, managing young forests and misconceptions about young forest.

Student walking through new young forest, Young Forest video series, U.S. Forest Service.U.S. Forest Service Vimeo Young Forest Videos:

Other resources:
Harvesting our forests, the wildlife debate, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) Got Nature? Blog
Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
Young Forest Video series, U.S. Forest Service.Forest Management for Reptiles and Amphibians: A Technical Guide for the Midwest, The Education Store
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Forest Birds , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Managing Woodlands for Birds , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Sustaining Our Oak-Hickory Forests , Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Ask the Expert: Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Birds and Salamander Research, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Breeding Birds, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Small Mammals, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Salamanders, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Moths, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Highlights: Bats, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment: How the HEE Came to Be, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment publications , Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment (HEE) website
New Videos Stress Importance of Young Forests, Purdue News – Forestry and Natural Resources

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


In this episode of A Woodland Management Moment, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee talks about crop tree release, the process of selecting timber crop trees that help meet your management objectives and managing the area around them in order to allow your selected trees to thrive in the stand.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners Video Series, Playlist, Indiana Department of Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Ask an Expert: Tree Selection and Planting, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

 

 


2020 HTIRC Annual Report Cover PhotoThe Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) was conceived in 1998 to address a perceived void in hardwood tree improvement research in the Central Hardwood Forest Region (CHFR) and is committed to enhancing the productivity and quality of CHFR trees and forests for the economic and environmental benefits they provide. Scientists at the HTIRC are using conventional tree improvement breeding as well as molecular and genetic technologies to improve the wood quality, growth characteristics, and insect and disease resistance of trees like black walnut, black cherry, red and white oaks, butternut and American chestnut. Research in tree breeding, tree nursery practices, tree plantation establishment and management, and Central Hardwoods silvicultural systems is aimed at increasing the regeneration success rate for high-quality hardwood trees and forests.

In this 2020 HTIRC Annual Report you will find current research happenings that include:

  • Integrated Digital Forestry Initiative (IDIF) – advancements in digital technology have revolutionized society and daily life. Smartphones today put more computing power in our pockets than the computer onboard with the Apollo Mission. Yet studying and managing forest resources still primarily relies on antiquated, imprecise, and tedious tools like sticks and tape measures.
  • Understanding and Manipulating Plant-soil Feedbacks To Manage The Invasive Shrub Lonicera Maackii – the overall objective of this research project is to determine the role of pathogens and AM fungi in driving or inhibiting Lonicera invasion in hardwood forests.
  • Precise Quantification of Forest Disturbances with UAS (IDIF) – the main goal of this research is to address how UAS can be properly utilized as an inventory mechanism prior to and after planned disturbance events.
  • Developing of Micropropagation and Regeneration System for Black Walnut – project objectives included: establishing sterile cultures of selected cultivars of black walnut; shoot multiplication and growth of healthy shoots; rooting and establishing plants in vitro; and successful transfer to soil and acclimation to ex-vitro conditions, including establishment in greenhouse.
  • A New, Faster, Cheaper, and Easier Way to Measure HTIRC Plantations (IDIF)- to develop and demonstrate a portable device capable of real-time tree measurements of tree diameters at regular height intervals. Although the data processing of terrestrial stereoscopic photogrammetry is much faster than for the popular SfM photogrammetry, it cannot yet provide “real-time” output, which we consider essential.

You will also find the Operational Tree Improvement Report and highlights of outreach events. Contact Wes Schempf, wschempf@purdue.edu, for further details on how you can partner with  HTIRC.

Resources:
HTIRC 2020 Annual Report
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)
Tropical Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (tropHTIRC)
Partners, Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources

Weston Schempf, Research & Communications Director
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

 


PurdueExt2020ImpactReportPurdue Extension: Purdue Extension is your educational partner for life. The 2020 Impact Report shows how Extension delivers practical, research-based information and events for Indiana’s residents in agriculture and natural resources, health and human sciences, and community development, and trains tomorrow’s leaders through Indiana 4-H Youth Development.

Check out the Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resource highlights on the following programs and extension specialists:

  • Keeping our forests healthy, pg. 5. Program: Forest Management for the Private Woodland Owner taught by Ron Rathfon, Purdue Extension Forester at the Southern Indiana Purdue Agricultural Center. For the northern counties Lenny Farlee, sustaining hardwood extension specialist with Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources, teaches the Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course.
  • A comprehensive approach to community development, pg. 43. Program: Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces, Kara Salazar, program leader and extension specialist for sustainable communities, and Dan Walker, community planning extension specialist, both with Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources.
  • Actively managing natural resources, pg. 52. Programs in partnership with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG): Tipping Point Planner, Conservation Through Community Leadership and Sustainable Communities, Kara Salazar, program leader and extension specialist for sustainable communities.

Resources
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
A Woodland Management Moment, FNR – Ext Playlist
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Community Planning, FNR -Ext Playlist
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities, The Education Store
Community Planning for Agriculture and Natural Resources: A Guide for Local Government, The Education Store
Tipping Point Planner, Website
Tipping Point Planner, The Education Store

Purdue Extension

Ron Rathfon, Regional Extension Forester
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Kara Salazar, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Dan Walker, Community Planning Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 26th, 2021 in How To, Land Use, Natural Resource Planning, Plants | No Comments »

tpp_bannerThe Tipping Point Planner project, a joint effort by Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant and Purdue Extension, has been selected as a 2020 recipient of the Purdue College of Agriculture’s TEAM (Together Everyone Achieves More) Award.

“The TPP program stands out because of its value and impact in assisting local communities in the Great Lakes Region,” Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources department chair Bob Wagner said in his nomination. “The program is unique in that it is composed of community activities dovetailed with a decision support system (DSS) that is based on user needs assessment. The TPP program has been in existence for nearly 10 years and has demonstrated outstanding innotpp1vation and impact. As an example, Esri recently showcased TPP as a model system that uses Esri technology to assist communities in important ways. This program highlights the success that both research and extension efforts can have when working closely together.”

The program was also recognized for its accomplishments in the Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources segment of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s 2019 Science Report, released in March.

The Tipping Point Planner was created to assist community leaders throughout the Great Lakes Basin in making long-term management decisions that affect environmental health of local resources and a community’s quality of life. The program, which includes a web-based decision support system, helps identify the status of watershed health by exploring land use, natural resources and environmental concerns, before determining the impacts of land-use decisions and management practices and, in turn, enables communities keep coastal ecosystems from reaching critical environmental limits, or tipping points, and becoming unstable.

tpp2In 2019, the Tipping Point Planner team worked with communities in Au Gres, Michigan; and Perrysburg, Ohio, to create action plans regarding conservation and ecological resource management. All told, more than 100 people in these areas utilized the Tipping Point Planner and collaborated in making the community decisions.

The science supporting TPP stems from multidisciplinary, collaborative work across several Big Ten universities and their associated Sea Grant and Extension offices. Lead researchers came from Purdue University, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, the University of Illinois-Chicago, the University of Minnesota-Duluth, and NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

Team members secured more than $14 million in extramural funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Great Lakes Fishery Trust, EPA’s Science to Achieve Results Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), United States Geological Survey (USGS) Climate Change Program, Wege Foundation, and the Kellogg Foundation to enable the necessary data collection, modeling, survey work, and stakeholder interviews. The project also was funded as part of Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources’ (FNR) Signature Areas (2005-2011), which supported five FNR students working on various aspects of the project.

tpp3Dr. Bryan Pijanowski, professor of landscape and soundscape ecology; Kara Salazar, assistant program leader and extension specialist for sustainable communities; Lydia Utley, data analyst; and Daniel Walker, community planning extension specialist, are the project leaders for the Tipping Point Planner.

The project also includes representatives from Purdue Agricultural and Biological Engineering, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Michigan State University Hydrogeology Lab. Other collaborators include the Eureka Aquatic Research, LLC; Michigan State University Center for Water Sciences, Michigan State College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan School for the Environment and Sustainability, the University of Albany College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resource Research Institute and the U.S. Geological Survey Great Lakes Science Center.

The full Tipping Point Planner Team consists of:
NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

  • Dr. Edward Rutherford – Research Fishery Biologist

Purdue University Human-Environment Modeling & Analysis Laboratory

  • Dr. Bryan Pijanowski – Professor
  • Dr. Kristen Bellisario – Post-Doctoral Research Associate
  • Dr. Kimberly Robinson – Former Graduate Student
  • NahNah Kim, JD – Former Graduate Student

Purdue University Agricultural & Biological Engineering

  • Dr. Bernard Engel – Professor and Department Head
  • Dr. Larry Theller – Research Associate (Retired)
  • Dr. Yaoze Liu – Postdoctoral Research Assistant
  • Dr. Jingqiu Chen – Postdoctoral Research Associate

Michigan State University Hydrogeology Lab

  • Dr. David Hyndman – Professor and Department Chair
  • Dr. Anthony Kendall – Research Assistant Professor
  • Dr. Sherry Martin – Research Associate
  • Emily Luscz – Former Graduate Student
  • Quercus Hamlin – Graduate Student
  • Luwen Wan – Graduate Student

Michigan State University Center for Water Sciences

  • Dr. R. Jan Stevenson – Professor and Co-Director of CWS

Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability

  • Dr. Mike Wiley – Professor (Retired)
  • Dr. Catherine Riseng – Professor

Eureka Aquatic Research LLC

  • Dr. Hongyan Zhang – Aquatic Ecologist

USGS Great Lakes Science Center

  • Dr. Yu-Chun Kao – Research Associate

University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resource Research Institute

  • Dr. Lucinda Johnson –Associate Director for Water

Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant

  • Dr. Brian Miller – Director (Retired) and Project Manager
  • Kara Salazar – Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities
  • Dan Walker – Community Planning Extension Specialist
  • Lydia Utley – Data Analyst
  • Ben Wegleitner – Former Outreach Assistant

Resources
Tipping Point Planner
Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Tipping Point Planner
With GIS, Communities See How Land-Use Changes May Affect Local Water Quality
Tipping Point Planner curriculum available from Purdue Extension Education Store
Tipping Point Planner Online course
Tipping Points: What are they? Why are they important?
Tipping Point Planner

Kara Salazar, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 22nd, 2021 in How To, Land Use, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

In this episode of FNR Ask the Expert, Purdue Extension wildlife specialist Jarred Brooke and Dr. Mike Saunders, associate Professor of Ecology and Natural Resources, talk about prescribed fire and how you can use this technique to manage your fields and woodlands.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Ask An Expert, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Prescribed Fire Techniques – Backing Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Prescribed Fire Techniques – Flanking Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Prescribed Fire Techniques – Strip Head Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Prescribed Fire Techniques – Spot Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Prescribed Fire Techniques – Ring Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Late Growing Season Prescribed Fire, Video
Renovating Native Warm-Season Grass Stands for Wildlife: A Land Manager’s Guide, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Prescribed fire: 6 things to consider before you ignite, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Indiana Prescribed Fire Council

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resource

Mike Saunders, Associate Professor of Ecology and Natural Resources
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 2nd, 2021 in How To, Land Use, Safety, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Browsing by deer on planted and naturally regenerated hardwood seedlings is one of the greatest obstacles to seedling establishment in many parts of the central hardwood region. In this Woodland Stewardship For Landowners, Purdue Wildlife Extension Specialist Brian MacGowan talks about different types of deer damage and how landowners could mitigate the damage.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Woodland Stewardship For Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Woodland Management Moment, Purdue Extension – FNR Playlist
A Woodland Management Moment – Deer Fencing, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Exclusion Cage, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
How to Build a Plastic Mesh Deer Exclusion Fence, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Finding help from a professional forester, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association

Brian MacGowan, Wildlife Extension Specialist & Extension Coordinator
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


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