Got Nature? Blog

Posted on February 9th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Podcasts, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

The podcast series housed within the Natural Research University network delivers expert-based knowledge of natural resource management. The network is a partnership between the extension services at several land-grant university, including Mississippi State Extension Service, University of Florida Extension, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Purdue Extension. Funding for the project comes from the Renewable Resources Extension Act.Habitat University Cover Page

Check out the new podcast in the Habitat University, hosted by Jarred Brooke and Adam Janke, discusses the science behind wildlife habitat management and how landowners and manages can use different habitat management practices to improve their land for wildlife. This podcast is part of the larger podcast network Natural Resources University (NRU), funded by the Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA).

In the final episode of this second season, Jarred and Adam review the conversations we’ve had on the theme of private lands habitat conservation, discuss some things “left on the bone,” and share with the listeners where Habitat University is heading in the new year! Be sure to check out the previous episodes in the podcast, including those from Season 2 discussed in this episode, and Season 1 if you haven’t already! And as always please help us improve the podcast by taking this Habitat University Listener Feedback Survey.

To listen to this episode, please visit Habitat University.

The Natural Resources University podcasts are available through the individual podcast websites, through the NRU podcast main hub or wherever podcasts are available to download.

Check out this article regarding the NRU groups award received: Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources News & Stories, Natural Resources University Podcasts Earn ANREP Gold Award .

More Resources:
Ask an Expert: Pond Management, Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube playlist
Pond Management: Managing Fish Populations, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Yellow Perch Farmed Fish Fact Sheet, The Education Store
Frogs and Toads of Indiana, The Education Store
Snakes and Lizards of Indiana, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Frost Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs with a Drone (UAV), Purdue Extension-FNR
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store
Invasive Plants: Impact on Environment and People, The Education Store
Sustainable Communities, Purdue Extension
Ask the Expert: Turtles and Snakes video, Got Nature? post
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist
Woodland Management Moment , Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 9th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Webinar, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Many forest landowners own and manage their land for hunted wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, wild turkey, and a host of other game species. This presentation titled Managing Your Woods for Game Species by Jarred Brooke, Extension Wildlife Specialist for Purdue University, discusses how forest management can be tailored to enhance habitat for game species and how forest management focused on game species can provide habitat for a suite of non-game wildlife.

The Toms, Tines, and Tanagers is a webinar event hosted by the Illinois Extension, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences.

 

 

Resources:
Hunting Guide for 2023-2024, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
How to Score Your White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
White-Tailed Deer Post Harvest Collection, video, The Education Store
Age Determination in White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store
How to Build a Plastic Mesh Deer Exclusion Fence, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Bovine Tuberculosis in Wild White-tailed Deer, The Education Store
Frost Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs with a Drone (UAV), Purdue Extension-FNR
Help With Wild Turkey Populations, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Turkey Brood Reporting, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Wild Turkey, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Wild Turkey Hunting Biology and Management, Indian Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Subscribe to Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources YouTube Channel, Wildlife Playlist

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Illinois Extension, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences


scent station photo

During K-12 Educator workshops, participants learn how to implement TNT curriculum such as building scent stations (pictured above). Photo by Jarred Brooke.

Agricultural & Natural Resources: Richard Louv’s words, “Time in nature is not leisure time, it’s an essential investment in our children’s health (and also, by the way, in our own),” underscores the critical role of nature in children’s well-being. Inspired by Louv’s concept of “nature deficit disorder,” The Nature of Teaching (TNT) was established in 2009 to connect youth to nature. The Nature of Teaching became an ANR signature program in 2019.

The primary focus of TNT is to engage K-12 youth with nature to foster environmental awareness and reap the positive health benefits of outdoor experiences. The program achieves this by integrating nature-based education into the school environment through standards-based curriculum. Through this, TNT not only connects students with nature but also provides lessons that align with Common Core and Next Generation Science standards.

During K-12 Educator workshops, participants learn how to implement TNT curriculum such as building scent stations (pictured above). Photo by Jarred Brooke.

The curriculum of The Nature of Teaching is divided into three key areas: Wildlife, Health and Wellness, and Food Waste. The Wildlife curriculum enhances students’ understanding of the natural world, while the Health and Wellness curriculum emphasizes the health benefits of connecting with nature. The Food Waste curriculum explores the environmental impact of food waste. Educators have access to more than 60 free standards-based lesson plans suitable for K-12 classrooms. In addition, TNT includes five informal curriculum units that are not standards-based and are more activity-focused. These informal lessons are great for field days and after-school type programs.

tnt union county hellbender adaptations

Veronica Bullock teaching a TNT lesson, Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, in a Union County classroom. Photo by Jennifer Logue.

Extension educators around the state have delivered TNT lessons to K-12 students since TNT became a signature program in 2019. In 2022 alone, 2,424 K-12 students benefited from TNT instruction, highlighting an impressive average knowledge increase of 16-31% in natural resources topics. The Nature of Teaching further supports K-12 educators through teacher workshops, with 17 teachers attending a workshop at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge in 2022. Attendees reported a significant boost in knowledge and confidence in connecting youth with nature.

Veronica Bullock teaching a TNT lesson, Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, in a Union County classroom. Photo by Jennifer Logue.

As part of the signature program, Extension educators deliver three educational sessions using TNT formal curriculum to at least 15 students. Educators are also asked to provide students with pre- and post-tests to better understand student learning outcomes. Most educators deliver TNT in their local school system over several weeks. However, others deliver TNT through school clubs, after-school programs, or other avenues. The signature program requirements for Nature of Teaching are on the ANR Intranet. Educators are encouraged to work across program areas to deliver TNT.

Starting this year, The Nature of Teaching will be co-led by Jarred Brooke, Extension wildlife specialist, and Veronica Bullock, ANR educator, Franklin County. Jarred and Veronica have a long history with the TNT program and are excited to lead TNT into the future.

For educators who are interested in TNT, we will host a webinar on April 2 at 10 a.m. EDT to discuss future changes to the Nature of Teaching Signature program. You can register for the webinar here.

To see this article and others, please visit ANR Newsletter-February 2024.

Visit Nature of Teaching to learn more and explore the different lessons.

Resources:
Virtual Workshops, Nature of Teaching
Nature of Teaching, Website, Purdue College of Agriculture
The Nature of Teaching, YouTube channel
Transporting Food Waste, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Benefits of Connecting with Nature, The Education Store
Nature of Teaching: Common Mammals of Indiana, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste Solutions, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste and the Environment, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, The Education Store
Trees of the Midwest Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel
Adaptations For Aquatic Amphibians Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel

Agriculture & Natural Resources (ANR)

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Veronica Bullock, ANR Extension Educator
Purdue Extension Franklin County


Posted on February 6th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Plants, Publication, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension: This Purdue Extension 2023 Impact Report features stories that highlight partnerships that have served our state’s producers, supported residents in becoming healthier, built more resilient communities and prepared Indiana’s youth to take that first step to their giant leap. We will continue to bring the science, technology and resources to all 92 counties as Indiana’s educational partner for life and as an extension of the world class institution we represent: Purdue University.2023 Impact Report Cover

Check out the Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resource highlights on the following programs:

  • Todays Teens Lead the Way in Sharing Love of STEM
  • Guiding Farm Families Down the Road of Succession Planning
  • Providing Support for Families Through Seasons of Change
  • Addressing Substance Use Recovery Together
  • Workforce Development Efforts Target a Broad Range of Users
  • Training International Farmers in Food Preservation and Processing
  • Farmer-Driven Research Creates Solutions

Resources:
Nature of Teaching, Purdue College of Agriculture
Community Development, Purdue Extension
Purdue Extension
Family Programs, Purdue Extension – Health and Human Sciences
Taking Action to Address Substance Use in Communities (TASC), Purdue Extension
Diversified Farming and Food Systems, Purdue Extension
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
A Woodland Management Moment, FNR – Ext Playlist
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Community Planning, FNR -Ext Playlist

Purdue Extension


Wild Bulletin, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Fish and Wildlife: Looking to build habitat that benefits wildlife species near you? February is a great time to complete winter habitat improvement projects, such as frost seeding native forbs, edge feathering forestsnow covered milkweed crop boundaries, prescribe-burning warm-season grass, and removing invasive species.

DNR’s wildlife habitat fact sheets can teach you the best techniques for your desired management practices. Need more information for your unique property? Contact your district’s Wildlife Biologist, who can meet with you to provide suggestions on wildlife habitat improvements based on your specific goals.

To learn more please visit DNR: Wildlife Habitat Fact Sheets.

Subscribe to Wild Bulletin.

Resources:
Frost Seeding to Establish Wildlife Food Plots and Native Grass and Forb Plantings – The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Tips for Evaluating a First Year Native Grass and Forb Planting, Got Nature? – Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Tips for Evaluating a First Year Native Grass and Forb Plantings, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Calibrating a No-Till Drill for Conservation Plantings and Wildlife Food Plots – The Education Store
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Project Overview & Drone Setup, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Seed Mixing, Loading the Hopper, Programming the Route, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Recapping the Project, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Renovating Native Warm-season Grass Stands for Wildlife, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Ordering Seedlings from the State Forest Nursery System, Got Nature? – Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Designing Hardwood Tree Plantings for Wildlife – The Education Store
ID That Tree – YouTube Playlist
Forest Management for Reptiles and Amphibians: A Technical Guide for the Midwest, The Education Store
Ask the Expert: Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Birds and Salamander Research, Purdue Extension – FNR
A Template for Your Wildlife Habitat Management Plan, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Winter Weather Tree Tips, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


Check out the new newsletter posts available by visiting the Indiana Woodland Steward website. Stay current in the world of forestry and receive their free e-newsletter by subscribing at IWS Subscribe.

Highlights from the current Newsletter include:IN Woodland Steward Newsletter Main Page

The Indiana Woodland Steward Newsletter is a resource that’s full of a variety of valuable information to foresters, woodland owners, timber marketing specialists, woodland enthusiasts and wildlife enthusiasts. The Indiana Woodland Steward Institute (IWS) is an entity made from 11 organizations within the state including Purdue UniversityIndiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association (IHLA), that works to promote best usage practices of Indiana’s woodland resources through their Woodland Steward publication.

Resources
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
Birdfeeder tips, The National Audubon Society
Birds and Residential Window Strikes: Tips for Prevention, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
Managing Woodlands for Birds Video, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Subscribe: Deer, Forest Management, ID That Tree, Woodland Management Moment, Invasive Species and many other topic video playlists Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Dan McGuckin, President
Indiana Woodland Steward

Dr. Brian MacGowan, Extension Wildlife Specialist
Department of Forestry & Natural Resources, Purdue University


People walking through grass area by forest on FNR property, Indiana Conservation Partnership hands-on training with HTIRC and Purdue FNR. The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) was conceived in 1998 to address a perceived void in hardwood tree improvement research in the Central Hardwood Forest Region (CHFR) and is committed to enhancing the productivity and quality of CHFR trees and forests for the economic and environmental benefits they provide. Scientists at the HTIRC are using conventional tree improvement breeding as well as molecular and genetic technologies to improve the wood quality, growth characteristics, and insect and disease resistance of trees like black walnut, black cherry, red and white oaks, butternut and American chestnut. Research in tree breeding, tree nursery practices, tree plantation establishment and management, and Central Hardwoods silvicultural systems is aimed at increasing the regeneration success rate for high-quality hardwood trees and forests.

In this Fall 2023 HTIRC Newsletter you will find current research happenings that include:

  • Douglass Jacobs Co-leader on Assessment of At-Risk Forest Trees – Douglass Jacobs of the HTIRC and Kasten Dumroese of the U.S. Forest Service led a team of 19 co-authors, including scientists, land managers and regulators, in presenting their findings on biotechnological risk assessment and forest tree restoration
  • Annual Report Available for 2022 – The annual report outlining HTIRC research projects, strategic directions and accomplishments is now available on the HTIRC website at Annual Report.
  • Indiana Conservation Partnership Training – In August of 2023, Extension and Property Management staff from HTIRC and Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources provided hands-on training days at the Purdue FNR Martell Forest and Southeast Purdue Ag Center properties for members of the Indiana Conservation Partnership, including USDA NRCS, Indiana SWCD, Indiana DNR, and Purdue Extension employees.
  • HTIRC Participates in Walnut Council Annual Conference – Several members of the HTIRC staff helped organize and presented at the annual National Walnut Council conference in Columbia, Missouri in July or 2023. This year was a unique event with three organizations joining forces for an impressive array of presentations an field tours.
  • Forgey Wins “Sagamore of the Wabash” Award – Michael Forgey, a resident of New Palestine and a seasoned Rush County farmer, was honored with the prestigious “Sagamore of the Wabash” award by Governor Eric Holcomb at the Forgey Tree Farm in Rush County, Indiana on November 1, 2023.
  • The HTIRC 2023 Seed Harvest – Seed production is a crucial component of the HTIRC’s improvement program, for without it there is no progeny testing or distribution of improved genetics to the public. This year, a droughty spring and early summer was followed by an unusually wet July, stimulating a bumper crop in the HTIRC’s orchards.

View the full Fall 2023 HTIRC Newsletter and meet the new administrative assistant, learn more about the awards received and current research.

Resources:
HTIRC 2020 Annual Report
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)
Tropical Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (tropHTIRC)
Partners, Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources
An Introduction to Trees of Indiana, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Subscribe to Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Finding help from a professional forester, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association
District Foresters for 10 plus acres, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Wood Products, FNR Concentration

Hardwood Tree Improvement Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

 


Posted on October 6th, 2023 in Community Development, Forestry, Land Use, Wildlife | No Comments »

Women viewing vegetables at city market, Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces, Purdue Extension.Purdue Extension Showcase, Purdue Extension Annual Report highlights Purdue Extension-Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces program: In Indiana, community leaders make decisions about public spaces such as parks, trails, and schools every day – decisions that affect the health and wellness of communities.

Purdue Extension’s Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities program coaches communities through development of high quality action plans for public spaces, guiding decisions and better positioning communities to take advantage of opportunities to promote healthy eating and active living. The curriculum is designed for decision-makers and local leaders who have oversight and management of community public spaces, such as parks boards and plan commissions, public officials and their staff, and members of organizations whose missions relate to services, programs, or management of public spaces.

The program combines data collection and analysis with inclusive public deliberation to design action plans toward meaningful, sustainable improvements of public spaces focused on community health. The goal is to strategically guide policy, systems, and environmental changes to promote healthy communities.

Focusing on Blackford County, a series of online and in-person public participation workshops were conducted to gather residents’ input for the parks and recreation five-year master plan. Three visioning workshops – each two hours long – allowed community members to share assets and opportunities for placemaking, active living, and healthy eating. Podcasts and videos were provided, helping residents understand the conceptual framework. At the first visioning session, participants compiled assets and opportunities, and then voted on themes they felt needed to be the focus of the next two workshops. During the second visioning virtual session, participants focused on placemaking, active living, and healthy eating. In the third session, participants prioritized strategies. At the final session, also two hours, participants completed an action plan for each strategy for placemaking, active living, and healthy eating. In addition, a public survey was conducted to gather input from community residents who could not attend the sessions. Survey results, community data, and the action plan were presented to the community in a 62-page report.

There were 46 virtual participant surveys and 279 public surveys received. Demographics of survey respondents (n=182) were: 94% White, 69% female, and 44% age 25-44. A third (34%) reported they earned less than $50,000 annually, and 25% had attended some college but did not earn a degree. A post-program evaluation was completed by 26 participants (57%). Over 95% found the program informative, felt engaged in activities, and had meaningful discussions. Participants indicated significant takeaways were the concept of community capital, involvement is key, and the realization that there are resources and organizations in the county that can be partners for healthy living. Several mentioned takeaways were working together, communication, and that the program was a catalyst for progress.

Action strategies developed have seen progress since the plan was delivered. To expand and market community events in the parks and create outdoor movie nights downtown, Purdue Extension partnered with Taylor University Social Work Department, Hartford City, Firefly Children and Family Alliance, and Meridian Services to host a community movie night with a mental health awareness theme. More than 70 people attended. Resources, including a newly published community directory, were shared. To develop youth leadership opportunities for parks and public spaces, local students were asked what they would like to see in the community. Twelve high school students identified improvements to a basketball court, and asked for support from Purdue Extension to connect them with local funders. Students raised $1,700 through a Change War competition at school, and a pitch to the plant manager and human resource director at the local 3M factory resulted in an additional $1,600; new goals will be installed. As a result of this effort, a Mayor’s Youth Council will be started to focus on project-based efforts. Purdue Extension’s Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities helped communities prepare public spaces action plans to boost economic development, improve the quality of life, and create a healthier place for individuals and families.

To read full article and others, check out Purdue Extension Showcase 2023.

Resources:
Community Development, Purdue Extension
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces Program Video, Purdue Extension
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces: Creating Healthy Communities, The Education Store – Purdue Extension’s resource center
Enhancing the Value of Public Spaces Curriculum, The Education Store
Sustainable Communities Extension Program Website, Purdue Extension
Conservation Through Community Leadership, The Education Store
Rainscaping Education Program, Purdue Extension
Subscribe to Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Purdue Extension

Kara Salazar, Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on September 21st, 2023 in Forestry, How To, Land Use, Plants, Urban Forestry, Wildlife | No Comments »

Purdue Landscape Report: When I was a kid, if you’d asked me what my favorite season was it would always immediately be summer. No school, time for playing outdoors, swimming, hiking, and late nights playing flashlight tag. Now, if I ranked the seasons from worst to best, they’d be Summer in last, followed by Winter (yes, I choose winter over summer), and a tie between Spring and Fall.  With the best temperatures, a mix of sun and rain/snow, and an explosion of colors from new blooms in the spring to the reds, yellows, and oranges of leaves before they drop in the fall, Spring and Fall are by far my favorite times of the year.  Well, we are nearly to the autumnal equinox with temperatures beginning to drop and the onset of some fall showers as I write this article. With Fall on the doorstep, I’ve received a repeated question recently, “Is it ok to plant a tree in the Fall?”Image of fall tree planting

The short answer to this question is, “Yes!” If you want to add some new tree canopy to your yard, then pick your spot, choose the appropriate species, call #811 before you dig, and get that shovel out. Fall has some excellent reasons to plant trees, two of which I’ve already mentioned, cooler temps and autumn rains. While Autumn tends to be the driest time of the growing season, evapotranspiration rates are generally lower than during the summer season. These conditions reduce heat and water stress on trees (but are not an excuse to not mulch and water your new tree). Another good reason to plant in the fall as opposed to Spring is that instead of amping up for growing, trees are powering down and putting resources into root growth and storage. This means better establishment for the root system and a head start on protection for next year’s summer heat and drought.

There are some points to take into consideration, though. Again, make sure to properly water and mulch your new trees. They need an average of 5 gallons a week per inch of stem diameter if weekly rain isn’t providing around 1” of water. Be aware of when the first freeze is expected. You want to make sure your new trees have at least 6 weeks in the ground before the first freeze/frost and can stop watering after the first freeze. Also, for tree selection/protection, avoid broad leafed evergreen trees as they can be damaged by cold desiccation and wrap the trunks of your new trees to protect them from sunscald and animal damage like rubbing from bucks during the rut.

If you keep these points in mind and continue caring for your tree for the next 2-5 years you should have a successful planting. If you have any questions feel free to contact me at bmccalli@purdue.edu or you can find an ISA Certified Arborist at the following link Find an Arborist.

To view this full article and other Purdue Landscape Report articles, please visit Purdue Landscape Report.

Subscribe and receive the newsletter: Purdue Landscape Report Newsletter.

Resources:
The Purdue Landscape Report
Planning the Tree Planting Operation, The Education Store
Tree Risk Management, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 2: Planting Your Tree, The Education Store
Planting Your Tree Part 1: Choosing Your Tree, Purdue Extension YouTube Channel
Summer Tree Care, Purdue Landscape Report
Tree Defect Identification, The Education Store
Tree Wound and Healing, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
Ask an Expert: Tree Selection and Planting, Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube playlist
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist
Subscribe – Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Channel

Ben McCallister, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources


In this episode of A Woodland Management Moment, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee talks about the high deer populations around forest land, which can make it difficult to get hardwood seedlings established. This video brings more details and introduces a revised less expensive design option as it coincides with our first deer fencing video.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners Video Series, Playlist, Indiana Department of Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Ask an Expert: Tree Selection and Planting, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


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