Got Nature? Blog

Invasive callery pear trees along tree line.Purdue Landscape Report: Most people these days have, at the very least, heard of Callery and Bradford pear trees and know something about the invasiveness of this ornamental street tree.  But I still get questions about what it is and why it’s so bad. So, I’d like to offer a little history of this infamous tree.  Where did it come from, why is it so popular, why is it such an awful tree to plant, and some suggestions for better species to plant in its place.

Pyrus calleryana, the Callery pear (Fig. 1), was originally introduced from Asia to the United States in 1908.  This was done in an attempt to breed pear trees that were resistant to fire blight, a bacterial disease that can spread rapidly causing leaves and branches to blacken as if burnt by fire, eventually resulting in death.  Along with its resistance, the Callery pear was tested as a rootstock for the edible European pear (Pyrus communis) and its vigor in growth.

Callery Pear grows to a height of 30 to 50 feet with a spread up to 30 feet wide.  Thick leaves grow alternately, are dark green, grow with sharp spurs along branches, and turn reddish-purple in the fall.  They are one of the first trees to bloom and begin to grow in the spring and one of the last to drop their leaves in the fall.  They produce a beautiful show of white flowers in the spring that have an unfortunate odor and an abundance of small fruits in the fall that are spread by birds and other wildlife.  In fact, invasive European Starlings are one of the primary species that feed on and spread the fruits and seeds.  Stems are smooth with light-colored lenticels while more mature stems are light to medium grey with fissures along the bark. Branching is usually upright in structure leading to poor branch unions that are weak and prone to failure.  They grow quickly and tolerate a wide variety of planting locations and conditions, which led to the widespread use as both street and ornamental trees in urban plantings.

The Bradford pear tree is a variety of Callery pear cultivated in the early 1950s as a sterile tree without sharp spurs.  Unfortunately, it cross-pollinated with other varieties leading to the rapid spread and out-competing of native species that we see in fields, along roadsides, and in forests today (Figs. 2 & 3).  As awareness of the environmental issues of Callery pear spreads, local and state governments are working on removing them from the landscape.  It is often joked that pruning these trees is extremely simple, involving a single cut at the base of the tree.

Due to the extensive use of these trees over the past 7 decades though, removals can lead to a large loss of existing canopy, especially with mature trees.  This loss is worth negating the ecological damage they cause and with patience can be replaced with more appropriate species.  Suggestions include serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis), flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), redbud (Cercis canadensis), and crabapple (Malus sylvestris).

For more information on invasive pear trees or on how to remove them see the links below.

To view this full article and other Purdue Landscape Report articles, please visit: Invasive Bradford/Callery Pear: Why it is so detrimental and what to plant instead.

Subscribe and receive the newsletter: Purdue Landscape Report.

Resources:
ID That Tree: Invasive Callery Pear, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
The Rise and Fall of the Ornamental Callery Pear Tree, Arboretum of Harvard University
Find an Arborist video, Trees are Good-International Society of Arboriculture (ISA)
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
Report Invasive Species, Purdue Invasive Species
The GLEDN Phone App – Great Lakes Early Detection Network
EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (Report Invasives)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Trees and Storms – The Education Store, Purdue Education’s resource center
Planting Your Tree, video, The Education Store
Tree Installation, The Education Store
Subscribe – Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Channel

Ben McCallister, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to a very rare Indiana shrub that’s a relic of the ice age here, and that is Canada yew. It’s only found in Indiana on very steep slopes, rock faces, and cliffs. It’s an evergreen, so it is coniferous. It’s also very palatable to deer, so deer browse has been very hard on this particular shrub.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


Lindsey Purcell sharing tree planting tips at outside workshop. Purdue Landscape Report receives TEAM award.Spring is almost here and we get to wave goodbye to winter.  Temperatures are rising, the winds are blowing, and trees are waking up—one of the hot topics every spring is planting.  If you missed the chance to get a tree or two (or many more) in the ground this past autumn, then now is the time to start thinking about it again.  Look at your planting spaces to see what kind of tree would do well.  Think about the tree going in the ground now vs 10 years from now, 30 years, or even 50 years.  Will a full-size oak fit in your space or will a smaller redbud work better?  Do you have poorly drained soil where a willow or bald cypress will enjoy the excess water or well-drained soil that an American beech or black gum might fare better? Think about what you might want growing in your portion of the ecosystem.  Are you looking for spring flowers, shade in the summer, color in the fall, or even different bark types and branch architecture for the winter?  Also, once you’ve made your decision and got your new tree make sure you plant it properly to ensure a long happy life and lots of enjoyment.

Don’t forget about the trees you already have in the ground, too.  One simple act that you can do to help them out is to re-mulch your current trees.  Mulching helps to regulate soil moisture and temperature for the roots of your trees.  Grab a rake and work last year’s mulch into the ground a little, then apply enough new mulch to have about a 2–3-inch layer around your tree.  Depending on the size of your tree you might need to have a larger mulch ring, but aim for at least a 3-foot diameter, and DO NOT mulch up to the trunk.  This is volcano mulching and creates an area of decay in the trunk that can lead to failure.  Leave a 2-3-inch ring between the trunk and the mulch.

For more spring tree tips check out the Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) “YouTube Shorts” video, Ben McCallister Offers Spring Tree Tips

If you have any questions about these topics, please check out the links provided on tree selection, planting, and mulching.

Resources:
The Purdue Landscape Report
Tree Installation, The Education Store
Choosing a Tree video, The Education Store
Planting Your Tree video, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees, The Education Store
Re-Mulch Your Trees, Purdue Landscape Report
Planting Your Tree Part 1: Choosing Your Tree, Purdue Extension YouTube Channel
Summer Tree Care, Purdue Landscape Report
Tree Defect Identification, The Education Store
Tree Wound and Healing, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
Ask an Expert: Tree Selection and Planting, Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube playlist
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist
Subscribe – Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Channel

Ben McCallister, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources

 


Observing the colors and patterns of blooming plants is an enjoyable spring activity that reinforces the plant world is becoming active after the long pause of winter. Most mature flowering plants produce some sort of flower structure, but some are more noticeable than others. Some of the earliest among native Indiana trees are red and silver maple, the elms, serviceberry and Ohio buckeye. Some of the showiest blooms are found on redbud, flowering dogwood, tuliptree and magnolias. Keeping a journal of when first blooms are sighted or taking date-stamped photos is a good way to track this sign of spring from year to year and give you a hint of when future blooms may happen.

ohio buckeye bloomredbud bloomflowering dogwood bloom

There is also a substantial show on the forest floor. Early-blooming wildflowers emerge and bloom before trees and shrubs expand leaves, allowing them access to sunlight in early spring. Some plants to look for include spring beauty, trilliums, Dutchman’s’ breeches, and bloodroot. Tree, shrub and plant field guides as well as plant ID apps can help you learn the ID features and life histories of these native plants.

Check out our Purdue Extension YouTube Channel to learn from Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester.  In this Purdue Extension-FNR “YouTube Shorts” video below you will learn about early blooming trees in the spring time.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to yet another native Indiana elm found in the far southwest corner of Indiana, and that is winged elm. It’s named for its prominent corky ridges that we see extending off the main stems and twigs. It has alternate leaf arrangement, simple leaves, and doubly serrated margins.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Winged Elm, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to yet another southern Indiana oak species. This one is a member of the broad white oak group and it’s called post oak. It’s called that because it’s a very rot resistant and hard wood that used to be used for fence posts. It has rounded lobes, no bristle tips, and typified by a cruciform shape of leaf.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Post Oak, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to a southern oak found in Indiana, cherrybark oak. This species can typically be found in bottomland areas in extreme southern Indiana. It’s a member of the broad red oak group. It has hairlike bristle tips, relatively large leaves, a waxy coating on the top, and lobes that have one or tow hair-like spines on the end.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Cherrybark Oak, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


Indiana Arborist Association
P.O. Box 946
Cicero, IN 46034
Press Release February 14, 2024

The Indiana Arborist Association (IAA) has received funding from Indiana Department of Natural Resource’s Community and Urban Forestry program to launch the first ever workforce development program dedicated to training certified arborists from underserved and disadvantaged communities in Northwest Indiana (NWI). This grant is funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry program.iaa logo

The IAA strives to enhance the quality of life for Indiana residents by encouraging the planting, maintenance and preservation of trees and promoting the advantages of working with qualified professional arborists who use current industry standards. Ashley Mulis, who will serve as program manager for the initiative is excited for this opportunity. “The need for qualified arborists in NWI has consistently surpassed the number of available practitioners. The IAA is thrilled to be able to launch such an important program in an area of the state that has historically suVered from both lack of tree canopy and certified arborists.” The State of Indiana along with many states across the U.S. struggle to fill jobs in the green industry with skilled labor. To eVectively manage the urban forest, communities need skilled practitioners in arboriculture who understand the biology, management needs, and critical ecosystem services trees provide.

The Arborist Apprenticeship program will be a collaborative eVort with several partners in NWI including Purdue University Northwest (PNW), Purdue Extension, and the Center for Workforce Innovation who will assist in the education and training of arborists who will go on to care for trees in disadvantaged communities of NWI. PNW Chancellor Kenneth Holford had this to say of the program partnership with IAA: “Purdue University Northwest is pleased to be a partner in this innovative workforce development program aimed at filling a growing and increasingly important gap in local talent to enhance the urban forests and ecosystems throughout Northwest Indiana. This program is consistent with PNW’s goal of building a strong, skilled, and sustained workforce for the region.”

Northwest Indiana has been the focus of a large multi-year tree planting eVort led by CommuniTree. CommuniTree is NWI’s flagship urban and community forestry program that brings non-profits, communities, government agencies, universities, and businesses together to deliver a shared goal of creating a more diverse, healthy, and equitable urban forest across the region. As of 2024, CommuniTree partners including the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC), the Student Conservation Association (SCA), the US Forest Service (USFS), the NWI Urban Waters Federal Partnership (NWI UWFP) and others, have planted over 10,000 trees across the region. These trees require professional management provided by trained certified arborists. “CommuniTree, an outgrowth of the NWI UWFP, has created an unparalleled opportunity for workforce development initiatives to continue to grow, sustain and diversify urban forests in the region by drawing on the strengths that regional partnerships bring to the table. The NWI UWFP fully supports the IAA in their endeavor to provide professionally trained and certified Arborists for NWI.” Victoria Wittig, Ph.D., the Northwest Indiana Urban Waters Federal Partnership Ambassador. “The Center of Workforce Innovations applauds IAA on their work to bring this transformational program to NWI. Disadvantaged communities often bear the brunt of climate change impacts and environmental degradation. Training individuals from these communities in climate adaptation and mitigation strategies can lead to healthier local environments. The CommuniTree program, in conjunction with this Arborist Apprenticeship program specifically aims to not only reverse these environmental impacts but also equip residents of those same communities with the skills and knowledge necessary to thrive in the emerging green economy through a proven work-and-learn model.” Shaun SahlhoV, Director of Planning and Fundraising at the Center of Workforce Innovations.

To learn more about the Indiana Arborist Association visit www.indiana-arborist.org or email info@indiana-arborist.org.

Media Contact:arborist on ropes cutting tree
Ashley Mulis, Business Manager
Indiana Arborist Association
Email: ashley@indiana-arborist.org
Phone: (219) 295-0048

Lindsey Purcell, Executive Director
Indiana Arborist Association
Email: lindsey@indiana-arborist.org
Phone: (219) 295-0048

Other Resources:
Urban Forestry, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
How to Find an Arborist Near You!, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
What is Urban Forestry? Do You Know?, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
Urban Forestry Minor, Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Storms Can Cause Damage and Tree Cleanup, What You Need to Know, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
Purdue Landscape Report, Purdue Science-Based Midwest Landscaping
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Woodland Wildlife Management, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel


State of Indiana Executive Department of Indianapolis Proclamation, Invasive Species Awareness Week, Feb. 25-March 2, 2024.Governor Eric Holcomb has proclaimed February 25th to March 2nd as 2024 Invasive Species Awareness Week in Indiana.

This serves as an important reminder for Hoosiers to be aware and report potentially devastating invasives.

This proclamation states “invasive aquatic, riparian and terrestrial species influence the productivity, value and management of land and water resources in Indiana and the cost to prevent, monitor and control invasive species costs Indiana millions annually and after habitat destruction, invasive species are a great threat to biodiversity and threaten the survival of native plants and animals and interfere with ecosystem functions by changing processes like fire, nutrient flow and flooding”.

It continues with “invasive species impede industry, threaten agriculture, endanger human health and are becoming increasingly harder to control as a result of rapid global commercialization and human travel; and invasive species are as significant threat to almost half of the native species currently listed as federally endangered.”

As Invasive Species Awareness Week starts Sunday, February 25th, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IN DNR), Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources and the Indiana Invasive Species Council will answer any questions you may have.

For Questions:
Ask an Expert, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources
Invasive Species – Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Indiana Invasive Species Council – Includes: IDNR, Purdue Department of Entomology and Professional Partners
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)

Report and Learn More About Invasive Species –
Great Lakes Early Detection Network App (GLEDN) – The Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health
EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System
Purdue University Report Invasive Species, College of Agriculture

Check Out Our Invasive Species Videos –
Subscribe: Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Invasive Species YouTube Video Playlist includes:

More Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Video Series –
Woodland Management Moment:

Woodland Stewardship for Landowners:

ID That Tree:

More Resources –
FNR Extension Publications, The Education Store:

Purdue Landscape Report:

FNR Extension Got Nature? Blog:

Don’t Miss These Resources:
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What Are Invasive Species and Why Should I Care?, Purdue Extension-FNR Got Nature? Blog
Emerald Ash Borer Information Network, Purdue University and Partners
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources

 


In 2023, our FNR Extension website featured stories on topics ranging from wildlife identification, concerns in forestry, urban forestry issues and aquaculture how-to guides. Here are the top stories our FNR Extension readers were interested in last year from archival favorites to new publications on our Got Nature! blog.

FROM THE ARCHIVES – ARTICLES ORIGINALLY POSTED PRIOR TO 2023tree trunk damage wounds and healing

1 – Tree Wounds and Healing — Trees are incredible survivors in spite of the challenges from pests of all kinds, including us! They are vulnerable to injuries such as mechanical wounds from lawn equipment, vehicles and ice. Pruning results in an intentional wound which is of importance to consider. Tree owners and managers need to prune trees to maintain aesthetic characteristics, remove infected limbs, reduce risk, or improve structural stability. Proper pruning practice and understanding tree wounds can minimize the impact of creating wounds on trees.

2 – Question: Can Tree Roots Cause Damage to a Home’s Foundation? — A reader asked this question regarding a pin oak tree that is within 10 feet of their house after receiving  A certified arborist took a look at it and said that he would like to use an Air Knife to expose the roots near the foundation (a walkout basement) to determine if the roots are causing damage and/or need to be pruned, or whether the tree needs to be removed since it is situated too close to the house.squirrel

3 – Question: I Saw A Squirrel with No Fur on Its Neck, Both Backside and Underneath. What Is This? — People can be taken aback by the sight of squirrels missing hair. Sightings of partially furred squirrels is not unusual with warmer temperatures experienced through the winter. Like many wildlife issues, the cause of hair loss in squirrels is not easy to answer and often results in more questions than answers. In most situations, hair loss does not impact populations of squirrels.

4 – Be on the Watch for EHD in Deer — In August 2019, residents were warned to be on the watch for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Diseases (EHD) in deer after a white-tailed deer in Clarke County, Indiana tested positive for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD), and potential EHD cases had been reported in 26 other Indiana counties. Here are a few things you should know about how EHD, how to spot it, and how to report it.tiger salamander

5 – Question: Are Carpenter Ants Harmful to My Tree? — Carpenter ants are very common inside trees, especially on larger, mature trees that are hollow with cavities. They nest in rotted, decayed wood, although some nests may extend into sound heartwood in the center of the tree. Carpenter ant presence is an indication of rotting wood, and infested trees should be checked to determine whether the rot has weakened the tree enough that it has become a risk of failure.

6 – Question: Why Are There So Many Acorns This Year? — If you have ever noticed acorns so numerous that you could not take a step without crushing several, you may be asking the question, “why are there so many acorns?” Some answers to this question can be found in the physiology and ecology of trees and their relationship to wildlife.

7 – It Is A Salamander. No, It Is a Lizard. Are They Different? — Salamanders are often mistaken for lizards, but the two groups are very different. Learn the differences between lizards and salamanders, how to identify each and more.slime flux silver maple

8 – Question: Blue Spruce is Dying, What Can I Do? — A reader sent in a question asking about a 40-year old spruce which is dying in the middle. There was a concern about Rhizosphaera needle cast as well as questions about fungus control sprays or alternative fungicide treatments.

9 – Slime Flux of Trees — Slime flux (also known as wet wood) is a dark, foul-smelling and unsightly seepage of sap from tree trunks. The disease is not usually a serious problem but the appearance can be alarming. Learn about the symptoms of slime flux, diagnosis and prevention measure.

10 – What Do Trees Do In the Winter? — Do they freeze up like unprotected water pipes? Or burst when it gets below freezing? Yes, the below-ground parts of a tree are kept insulated by mulch, soil and a layer of snow, and that is important to survival, but the exposed parts of a tree are not protected.

To see the full article, please visit FNR News & Stories.

Resources
Tree Pruning: What Do Trees Think?, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment, The Education Store
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Diseases in Hardwood Tree Plantings , The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Iron Chlorosis of Trees and Shrubs, The Education Store
Purdue Landscape Report, Website
Winterize Your Trees, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Defect Identification, The Education Store
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
Urban Forestry, Purdue Extension – FNR playlist

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Got Nature?

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