Got Nature? Blog

Indiana Arborist Association
P.O. Box 946
Cicero, IN 46034
Press Release February 14, 2024

The Indiana Arborist Association (IAA) has received funding from Indiana Department of Natural Resource’s Community and Urban Forestry program to launch the first ever workforce development program dedicated to training certified arborists from underserved and disadvantaged communities in Northwest Indiana (NWI). This grant is funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry program.iaa logo

The IAA strives to enhance the quality of life for Indiana residents by encouraging the planting, maintenance and preservation of trees and promoting the advantages of working with qualified professional arborists who use current industry standards. Ashley Mulis, who will serve as program manager for the initiative is excited for this opportunity. “The need for qualified arborists in NWI has consistently surpassed the number of available practitioners. The IAA is thrilled to be able to launch such an important program in an area of the state that has historically suVered from both lack of tree canopy and certified arborists.” The State of Indiana along with many states across the U.S. struggle to fill jobs in the green industry with skilled labor. To eVectively manage the urban forest, communities need skilled practitioners in arboriculture who understand the biology, management needs, and critical ecosystem services trees provide.

The Arborist Apprenticeship program will be a collaborative eVort with several partners in NWI including Purdue University Northwest (PNW), Purdue Extension, and the Center for Workforce Innovation who will assist in the education and training of arborists who will go on to care for trees in disadvantaged communities of NWI. PNW Chancellor Kenneth Holford had this to say of the program partnership with IAA: “Purdue University Northwest is pleased to be a partner in this innovative workforce development program aimed at filling a growing and increasingly important gap in local talent to enhance the urban forests and ecosystems throughout Northwest Indiana. This program is consistent with PNW’s goal of building a strong, skilled, and sustained workforce for the region.”

Northwest Indiana has been the focus of a large multi-year tree planting eVort led by CommuniTree. CommuniTree is NWI’s flagship urban and community forestry program that brings non-profits, communities, government agencies, universities, and businesses together to deliver a shared goal of creating a more diverse, healthy, and equitable urban forest across the region. As of 2024, CommuniTree partners including the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC), the Student Conservation Association (SCA), the US Forest Service (USFS), the NWI Urban Waters Federal Partnership (NWI UWFP) and others, have planted over 10,000 trees across the region. These trees require professional management provided by trained certified arborists. “CommuniTree, an outgrowth of the NWI UWFP, has created an unparalleled opportunity for workforce development initiatives to continue to grow, sustain and diversify urban forests in the region by drawing on the strengths that regional partnerships bring to the table. The NWI UWFP fully supports the IAA in their endeavor to provide professionally trained and certified Arborists for NWI.” Victoria Wittig, Ph.D., the Northwest Indiana Urban Waters Federal Partnership Ambassador. “The Center of Workforce Innovations applauds IAA on their work to bring this transformational program to NWI. Disadvantaged communities often bear the brunt of climate change impacts and environmental degradation. Training individuals from these communities in climate adaptation and mitigation strategies can lead to healthier local environments. The CommuniTree program, in conjunction with this Arborist Apprenticeship program specifically aims to not only reverse these environmental impacts but also equip residents of those same communities with the skills and knowledge necessary to thrive in the emerging green economy through a proven work-and-learn model.” Shaun SahlhoV, Director of Planning and Fundraising at the Center of Workforce Innovations.

To learn more about the Indiana Arborist Association visit www.indiana-arborist.org or email info@indiana-arborist.org.

Media Contact:arborist on ropes cutting tree
Ashley Mulis, Business Manager
Indiana Arborist Association
Email: ashley@indiana-arborist.org
Phone: (219) 295-0048

Lindsey Purcell, Executive Director
Indiana Arborist Association
Email: lindsey@indiana-arborist.org
Phone: (219) 295-0048

Other Resources:
Urban Forestry, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
How to Find an Arborist Near You!, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
What is Urban Forestry? Do You Know?, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
Urban Forestry Minor, Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Storms Can Cause Damage and Tree Cleanup, What You Need to Know, Purdue Extension – FNR Got Nature? Blog
Purdue Landscape Report, Purdue Science-Based Midwest Landscaping
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Woodland Wildlife Management, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel


State of Indiana Executive Department of Indianapolis Proclamation, Invasive Species Awareness Week, Feb. 25-March 2, 2024.Governor Eric Holcomb has proclaimed February 25th to March 2nd as 2024 Invasive Species Awareness Week in Indiana.

This serves as an important reminder for Hoosiers to be aware and report potentially devastating invasives.

This proclamation states “invasive aquatic, riparian and terrestrial species influence the productivity, value and management of land and water resources in Indiana and the cost to prevent, monitor and control invasive species costs Indiana millions annually and after habitat destruction, invasive species are a great threat to biodiversity and threaten the survival of native plants and animals and interfere with ecosystem functions by changing processes like fire, nutrient flow and flooding”.

It continues with “invasive species impede industry, threaten agriculture, endanger human health and are becoming increasingly harder to control as a result of rapid global commercialization and human travel; and invasive species are as significant threat to almost half of the native species currently listed as federally endangered.”

As Invasive Species Awareness Week starts Sunday, February 25th, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IN DNR), Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources and the Indiana Invasive Species Council will answer any questions you may have.

For Questions:
Ask an Expert, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources
Invasive Species – Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Indiana Invasive Species Council – Includes: IDNR, Purdue Department of Entomology and Professional Partners
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)

Report and Learn More About Invasive Species –
Great Lakes Early Detection Network App (GLEDN) – The Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health
EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System
Purdue University Report Invasive Species, College of Agriculture

Check Out Our Invasive Species Videos –
Subscribe: Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Invasive Species YouTube Video Playlist includes:

More Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Video Series –
Woodland Management Moment:

Woodland Stewardship for Landowners:

ID That Tree:

More Resources –
FNR Extension Publications, The Education Store:

Purdue Landscape Report:

FNR Extension Got Nature? Blog:

Don’t Miss These Resources:
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What Are Invasive Species and Why Should I Care?, Purdue Extension-FNR Got Nature? Blog
Emerald Ash Borer Information Network, Purdue University and Partners
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources

 


In 2023, our FNR Extension website featured stories on topics ranging from wildlife identification, concerns in forestry, urban forestry issues and aquaculture how-to guides. Here are the top stories our FNR Extension readers were interested in last year from archival favorites to new publications on our Got Nature! blog.

FROM THE ARCHIVES – ARTICLES ORIGINALLY POSTED PRIOR TO 2023tree trunk damage wounds and healing

1 – Tree Wounds and Healing — Trees are incredible survivors in spite of the challenges from pests of all kinds, including us! They are vulnerable to injuries such as mechanical wounds from lawn equipment, vehicles and ice. Pruning results in an intentional wound which is of importance to consider. Tree owners and managers need to prune trees to maintain aesthetic characteristics, remove infected limbs, reduce risk, or improve structural stability. Proper pruning practice and understanding tree wounds can minimize the impact of creating wounds on trees.

2 – Question: Can Tree Roots Cause Damage to a Home’s Foundation? — A reader asked this question regarding a pin oak tree that is within 10 feet of their house after receiving  A certified arborist took a look at it and said that he would like to use an Air Knife to expose the roots near the foundation (a walkout basement) to determine if the roots are causing damage and/or need to be pruned, or whether the tree needs to be removed since it is situated too close to the house.squirrel

3 – Question: I Saw A Squirrel with No Fur on Its Neck, Both Backside and Underneath. What Is This? — People can be taken aback by the sight of squirrels missing hair. Sightings of partially furred squirrels is not unusual with warmer temperatures experienced through the winter. Like many wildlife issues, the cause of hair loss in squirrels is not easy to answer and often results in more questions than answers. In most situations, hair loss does not impact populations of squirrels.

4 – Be on the Watch for EHD in Deer — In August 2019, residents were warned to be on the watch for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Diseases (EHD) in deer after a white-tailed deer in Clarke County, Indiana tested positive for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD), and potential EHD cases had been reported in 26 other Indiana counties. Here are a few things you should know about how EHD, how to spot it, and how to report it.tiger salamander

5 – Question: Are Carpenter Ants Harmful to My Tree? — Carpenter ants are very common inside trees, especially on larger, mature trees that are hollow with cavities. They nest in rotted, decayed wood, although some nests may extend into sound heartwood in the center of the tree. Carpenter ant presence is an indication of rotting wood, and infested trees should be checked to determine whether the rot has weakened the tree enough that it has become a risk of failure.

6 – Question: Why Are There So Many Acorns This Year? — If you have ever noticed acorns so numerous that you could not take a step without crushing several, you may be asking the question, “why are there so many acorns?” Some answers to this question can be found in the physiology and ecology of trees and their relationship to wildlife.

7 – It Is A Salamander. No, It Is a Lizard. Are They Different? — Salamanders are often mistaken for lizards, but the two groups are very different. Learn the differences between lizards and salamanders, how to identify each and more.slime flux silver maple

8 – Question: Blue Spruce is Dying, What Can I Do? — A reader sent in a question asking about a 40-year old spruce which is dying in the middle. There was a concern about Rhizosphaera needle cast as well as questions about fungus control sprays or alternative fungicide treatments.

9 – Slime Flux of Trees — Slime flux (also known as wet wood) is a dark, foul-smelling and unsightly seepage of sap from tree trunks. The disease is not usually a serious problem but the appearance can be alarming. Learn about the symptoms of slime flux, diagnosis and prevention measure.

10 – What Do Trees Do In the Winter? — Do they freeze up like unprotected water pipes? Or burst when it gets below freezing? Yes, the below-ground parts of a tree are kept insulated by mulch, soil and a layer of snow, and that is important to survival, but the exposed parts of a tree are not protected.

To see the full article, please visit FNR News & Stories.

Resources
Tree Pruning: What Do Trees Think?, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment, The Education Store
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Diseases in Hardwood Tree Plantings , The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Iron Chlorosis of Trees and Shrubs, The Education Store
Purdue Landscape Report, Website
Winterize Your Trees, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Defect Identification, The Education Store
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
Urban Forestry, Purdue Extension – FNR playlist

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Videos on the Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Extension YouTube channel received more than 213,000 views in 2023. The Top 50 videos included 47 editions of ID That Tree, an informational series by Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee, as well as a webinar by Farlee on How to Identify Trees in Indiana. The remaining two videos in the Top 50 were an instructional video about a common urban tree planting problem by former Purdue Extension urban forester Lindsey Purcell, and a video about the use of prescribed fire on the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment.

Below we will count down the 10 most viewed Purdue FNR Extension videos of 2023 with a few bonus videos sure to shoot up the list in future years.

Our most viewed video in 2023 was ID That Tree: Black Walnut with a whopping 18,156 views. This video has been seen more than 28,000 times since its debut in September of 2020.

1 – ID That Tree: Black Walnut — Learn the identifying characteristics of the black walnut tree, also known as the American black walnut or eastern black walnut, including pairs of leaflets running down each stem, long running ridges on the bark, and round nuts that have a very strong exterior. This sun-loving tree also needs high quality soil.

Our second most viewed video is ID That Tree: American Elm. This video, which debuted in June 2020, was watched 16,779 times in 2023, and has been viewed 33,456 times overall.

2 – ID That Tree: American Elm — In this tree identification series you will see how American elm leaves have jagged edges with a large tooth and then smaller teeth like edges on top of it. Find out why these trees are not as easy to find as they used to be.

Number three on our most viewed list is ID That Tree: Black Oak. This video, which debuted in March 2021, was seen 5,773 times in 2023.

3 – ID That Tree: Black Oak — In this episode of ID That Tree, we continue to get to know the oak groups, this time focusing on the black oak species. Deep sinuses on the leaves and shinier coat, a dark blocky bark and acorns with loose shingle-like plates on the cap are some key identifiers to separate it from the red oak and others.

Number four on the most viewed videos list was ID That Tree: Invasive White Mulberry. This video, which debuted in September 2021, was seen 5,197 times in 2023.

4 – ID That Tree: Invasive White Mulberry — On this episode of ID That Tree, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to a non-native invasive tree that is widespread across the state, white mulberry. Key identifying characteristics to separate it from its native cousin red mulberry are shiny variable leaves and where the species grows, near fence rows, hedgerows and other waste areas. The red mulberry has larger leaves that are duller in color with a sandpapery texture, and the species is often found in the forest understory.

Fifth on our countdown of top videos of 2023 is ID That Tree: Pignut Hickory. This video, which debuted in March 2022, was seen 4,569 times in 2023.

5 – ID That Tree: Pignut Hickory — In this edition of ID That Tree, meet another member of the hickory family that can found in upland areas, the pignut hickory. This species is identifiable by its five-leaflet compound leaves, its smooth round nut and partially open husk.

Number six on our list of top videos for the year is ID That Tree: Northern Catalpa. This video, which debuted in August 2021, was watched 4,489 times in 2023.

6 – ID That Tree: Northern Catalpa – On this episode of ID That Tree, meet the Northern Catalpa, native to southern Indiana along the Ohio River bottoms. This species, which provides rot resistant wood great for outdoor usage, features beautiful flower clusters in early summer, huge heart shaped leaves in whirled formation, and long bean-like fruit pods.

Number seven on our Purdue FNR Extension most viewed list is ID That Tree: Sassafras. This video, which debuted in July 2020, was seen 4,481 times in 2023. Graduate student Olivia Bingham is researching sassafras wilt in Indiana and needs your help with possible sightings across the state.

7 – ID That Tree: Sassafras — Join Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee as he introduces you to the Sassafras in this edition of ID That Tree. The Sassafras is well known for the tea made from its bark and also for having a variety of shaped leaves from zero to three lobes.

Eighth on our 2023 most watched videos list is ID That Tree: Red Pine. This video, which debuted in February 2022, was seen 4,470 times in 2023.

8 – ID That Tree: Red Pine — This week on ID That Tree, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to a non-native conifer that can be found throughout the state, the Red Pine. This species, which enjoys sandy soil, is identifiable by its small, egg-shaped cones, as well as tufts of needle pairs, which can be quite brittle, and orange/reddish bark.

Number nine on our most watched list is ID That Tree: Pin Oak. This video, which debuted in December 2021, was viewed 4,100 times in 2023.

9 – ID That Tree: Pin Oak — On this edition of ID That Tree, meet a species of native Indiana oak from the broad red/black oak family, which is found in bottomlands and areas with imperfectly drained soil, the Pin Oak. This species is recognizable by round acorns with flat scales, bristle-tipped leaves with deep 90-degree angled lobes, and lower branches that angle downward.

Number 10 on our most watched list is ID That Tree: Honey Locust. This video, which debuted in October 2021, was seen 3,510 times in 2023.

10 – ID That Tree: Honey Locust — This native tree comes with its own defense system in very large thorns on the stems and trunk. Meet the honey locust. Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee explains that large, long yellow seed pods that resemble bean pods, the option of single or doubly compound leaves on the same tree and smooth gray bark also help identify this species.

To see the full article, please visit FNR News & Stories.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Check out the new newsletter posts available by visiting the Indiana Woodland Steward website. Stay current in the world of forestry and receive their free e-newsletter by subscribing at IWS Subscribe.

Highlights from the current Newsletter include:IN Woodland Steward Newsletter Main Page

The Indiana Woodland Steward Newsletter is a resource that’s full of a variety of valuable information to foresters, woodland owners, timber marketing specialists, woodland enthusiasts and wildlife enthusiasts. The Indiana Woodland Steward Institute (IWS) is an entity made from 11 organizations within the state including Purdue UniversityIndiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association (IHLA), that works to promote best usage practices of Indiana’s woodland resources through their Woodland Steward publication.

Resources
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
Birdfeeder tips, The National Audubon Society
Birds and Residential Window Strikes: Tips for Prevention, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
Managing Woodlands for Birds Video, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Subscribe: Deer, Forest Management, ID That Tree, Woodland Management Moment, Invasive Species and many other topic video playlists Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Dan McGuckin, President
Indiana Woodland Steward

Dr. Brian MacGowan, Extension Wildlife Specialist
Department of Forestry & Natural Resources, Purdue University


Photo from HEENewsletterThe Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment (HEE) just updated their newsletter for the fall/winter season. The Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment (HEE) was developed to study the effectiveness of different forest management methods in promoting successful oak and hickory regeneration and the effects of these management practices on plant and animal species. With nine partnering universities and agencies conducting research on the ecological and social impacts of long-term forest management, HEE has been an integral part of completed research for over 30 plus M.S. and Ph.D. level graduate students. The project has also employed more than 250 undergraduate and post-graduate students to conduct summer field work.

Newsletter topics include:

Squirrel & Small Mammal Crew

  • Sarah Baker (PhD Candidate, Purdue) and three Wildlife Technicians conducted squirrel point count surveys. Camera trapping for squirrels and small mammals was also conducted.

Cerulean Warbler Crew

  • Julian Grudens (MS Candidate, BSU) and Brit Nahorney (MS Candidate, BSU) worked with two Technicians to conduct aural surveys, nest searching, and mist netting.
    They also collected caterpillar droppings to investigate the dietary preferences of Ceruleans.

Bat Crew

  • Josie Hoppenworth (MS Candidate, UIUC) and Reed Crawford (PhD Candidate, UIUC) worked with two Technicians to conduct mist netting and find and catalogue roost trees.

Additional Work

  • Longhorn beetle trapping was conducted (Purdue).
  • Moth samples were collected (Drake University).

Introducing New HEE Staff
Rae Garrett – Field Coordinator
Rae began as the Field Coordinator in May 2023. Recently she graduated from Purdue University with a BS in Wildlife Biology with a minor in Insect Biology. Since then, she has worked in various temporary positions gaining experience in field work and outreach. She looks forward to assisting HEE Researchers with continuing data collection and working with Kat to reach new goals in outreach.

Kat Shay – Project Coordinator
Kat began as the Project Coordinator in September 2023. She has an MS in Environmental Science and an MPA from Indiana University, where she worked in Dr. Kim Novick’s lab on various phenology, carbon flux, oak leaf-miner, and cicada projects in Morgan Monroe and Yellowwood. She holds a BS in Environmental Science from the University of Alabama, where she worked in the Spatial Ecology Lab. She previously worked for NOAA at the Beaufort Lab in NC, conducting research on carbon flux and storage in salt marshes. Most recently she worked in the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California, managing conservation, recreation, and restoration projects. She has lived in Scotland, Germany, and all over the US and loves reading, traveling, and sports (especially soccer and rugby). She’s excited Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Fall/Winter 2023 to join the HEE team and continue working in the forests she loves.

To view the full newsletter visit: HEE Newsletter.

If you would like to receive the HEE e-newsletter send your name, email, address and your interests to Kat Shay, forest project coordinator, at koshay@purdue.edu.

Resources:
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
The Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment: Indiana Forestry and Wildlife, The Education Store
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store
The Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment: 2006-2016, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment Playlist, Subscribe to Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Prescribed Fire, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Finding help from a professional forester, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association

Kat Shay, Forest Project Coordinator
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment (HEE)
Purdue Forestry & Natural Resources


People disposing Christmas tree, photo by Larry Caplan.

Photo by Larry Caplan.

When do you need to discard your real Christmas tree? What options are there in disposing the tree?
Check out these tips from our Purdue experts:

Lenny Farlee, Purdue Extension Forester with Forestry and Natural Resources, in interview with the WLFI news team shares the first steps is to remove all decorations. “Several municipalities here in the area will either take the trees for mulching or composting. So if you don’t want to fool with the tree anymore, that’s a great option. You can just take it to the curb, or certain locations, and they’ll take care of it for you and it gets reused or recycled into usable material,” explains Farlee.  Choosing to keep the tree in your backyard is a great wildlife friendly option. Lenny shares how important it is to remove your tree in a timely manner to avoid any fire hazards in your house. The video explains on how you can test your tree to see if it should be discarded. See video and full article for more options: Options for Getting Rid of Real Christmas Tree, wlfi.com.

John Woodmansee, Purdue Extension Educator-Agriculture Natural Resources (ANR), also shares tips in the Purdue Extension article Recycle Your Christmas Tree. If you have permission and/or have access to a private pond you can discard your tree in the pond to improve fish habitat.

Resources:
A Choose-and-Cut Pine and Fir Christmas Tree Case Study, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Living Christmas Trees For The Holidays and Beyond, The Education Store
Tips for First-Time Buyers of Real Christmas Trees, The Education Store
Growing Christmas Trees, The Education Store
Selecting an Indiana-Grown Christmas Tree, The Education Store
Repurposing Your Real Christmas Tree, Purdue Extension News
An Introduction to Trees of Indiana, The Education Store
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Subscribe to Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Finding help from a professional forester, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association
District Foresters for 10 plus acres, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Wood Products, FNR Concentration

Diana Evans, Extension & Web Communications Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


lenny farlee mountain river view

Three foresters with exemplary careers, including two Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources alumni, were recognized with the John F. Datena Distinguished Forester Award at the recent Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association annual conference.

Jack Nelson of Lizton, Lenny Farlee of Lafayette and Bob Koenig (posthumously) from Greencastle were recognized for their leadership in forestry and support for Indiana woodland owners.

The Datena Award, named after former state forester John F. Datena to honor his commitment to Indiana forestry, recognizes professional foresters who have been highly influential in promoting the forestry profession in a manner that rises above their peers. Honorees have spent their careers making significant and sustained contributions to the betterment of forestry and are recognized by their peers to be leaders.

Jack Nelson retired after 34 years working for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry and followed that long career with a private consulting forestry business. He has been practicing forestry for 53 years. In his role with the DNR he assisted private landowners and administered the Indiana Timber Buyers Licensing and Indiana Classified Forest programs. He owned a Christmas tree farm for 30 years and is active in many conservation organizations.

After a 20-year career with the IDNR Division of Forestry, Lenny Farlee pivoted to an Extension Forester role at Purdue University, where he provides science-based information on sustainable forest management to woodland owners and natural resource professionals across the Central Hardwoods region. Lenny is especially known for the “Forest Management for the Private Woodland Owner” short course he annually teaches and his series of 120+ videos on tree identification.

“This award has special significance to me as my fellow awardees this year were both pivotal supervisors and mentors in my early career,” Farlee said. “It also represents a very humbling acknowledgement of contributions over a career to the profession and practice of forestry in Indiana, something that has been my joy and pleasure to participate in with so many others. I recognize that significant accomplishments are always done in conjunction with others, and I am grateful for the support and assistance I have received from the Indiana forestry community over these many years.”

Farlee earned his bachelor’s degree in Forestry and Natural Resources from Purdue in 1985 and his master’s degree in 1991. He then worked as a nursery forester with the Indiana Division of Forestry at Vallonia State Tree Nursery from 1988 to 1991 and as a district forester from 1991 to 2006. In January 2007, Farlee joined Purdue FNR as an extension forester for the Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center.

Farlee received the Friend of Conservation Award from the Tippecanoe County Soil and Water Conservation District in 2015 and was named as a recipient of the Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association’s President’s Award in 2015 and 2017. He also was part of the multidisciplinary group that received the PUCESA Team Award in 2021 for its outreach work on the cicada emergence.

To see the full article, please visit the FNR News and Stories page.

Resources:
Forest Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course Program Impacts, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR)
Forest Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course – Wabash County, Purdue Extension-FNR Events
Forestry Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course – SIPAC, Purdue Extension-FNR Events
Virtual Forest Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course, Purdue Extension-FNR Events
Forestry Management for the Private Woodland Owner Course – Jackson County, Purdue Extension-FNR Events
Cost Assistance for Landowners Planning Conservation Practices, Purdue Extension-FNR Got Nature? Blog
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners: EQUP, video, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners YouTube Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR
Woodland Management Moment: Invasive Species Control Process, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Woodland Management Moment YouTube Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR
Invasive Species YouTube Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Report Invasive Species, Purdue Invasive Species
The GLEDN Phone App – Great Lakes Early Detection Network
EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment: Uneven-aged Management, Purdue Extension – FNR Video
Finding help from a professional forester, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

 


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to another member of the oak family found in Indiana, and that’s northern pin oak. You can find it in the northern part of Indiana on dry and sandy soils. It’s a member of the red and black oak group, so it has bristle tips on the ends of the lobes of the leaves. The twigs can be found anywhere from medium to dark grey, and the buds are very dark and sharply pointed.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to a native Indiana species, and that’s sourwood. It’s much more common in the Appalachian mountain range, but can be found on Indiana’s southern boundary across the Ohio River. Sourwood gets its name from its sour/bitter flavor when you taste it. It has alternate leave arrangement, simple leaves, and very finely serrated margins. It can also put on a great fall color.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


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