Got Nature? Blog

Posted on August 18th, 2021 in Forestry, Plants, Urban Forestry, Webinar | No Comments »
Figure 1 Fall Webworm Photo

Figure 1. White webs of fall webworm are a common site along roadsides and forest edges.

Purdue Landscape Report: Just after the browned leaves on branches of trees attacked by periodical cicadas began to disappear from view, webworms and their associated browning started to spread through the landscape. Two of the more common webworms I have been seeing are the mimosa and the fall webworm. While neither of them can outright kill trees, they are unsightly, especially at the end of the summer when substantial portions of the tree are disfigured. Treatment late in the summer does little to reduce injury, because it can be difficult to penetrate the webs with insecticides, and because most of the damage has already been done. The best course of action is to plan on managing these insects next year, when they are more easily controlled with insecticides.

Figure 2 Fall Webworm Catipillar Photo

Figure 2. Fall webworms and fecal pellets feeding in web.

Fall webworm attacks a wide range of deciduous trees including flowering fruit trees, black walnuts, elm, hickory and bald cypress. They are most common in suburban areas, roadsides and forest edges that lack the predators and parasites the webworms encounter in the forest. In June adults emerge from wintering sites to lay eggs in the canopy. Eggs hatch into caterpillars that encase branches in webs as they feed. By the end of the second generation in late August webs can cover substantial portions of trees. Caterpillars are yellowish-green with black spots and long white hairs, and grow up to 1.5″. Caterpillar feces falling from trees can be a problem during heavy infestations.

Figure 3 Brown Webbing Photo

Figure 3. Brown webbing caused by the mimosa webworm is extensive on honeylocust plantings throughout the state.

Unlike fall webworm, the mimosa webworm only attacks honeylocust and mimosa trees. Leaves on ends of branches become webbed together and turn brown as lime-green caterpillars skeletonize leaf tissue. Heavily infested trees appear frosted brown. In early June, adults emerge and lay eggs on trees. First webs can be seen on ends of branches in mid-June when oak leaf hydrangea and tree lilac are in bloom. The second generation of adults fly and lay eggs starting in late July. A third generation occurs in the fall. The dangling caterpillars can be a nuisance under heavily infested trees. We are seeing an uptick in the abundance of this pest because the last two winters have not been cold enough to kill them.

Full Article >>>

Resources:
Purdue Landscape Report
Ask an Expert, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Purdue Plant Doctor App Suite, Purdue Extension – Entomology
Landscape & Ornamentals-Bagworms, The Education Store, Purdue Extension
Bagworm caterpillars are out feeding, be ready to spray your trees, Got Nature? Post, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Fall Webworms: Should You Manage Them, Got Nature? Post, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources

Clifford Sadof, Professor of Entomology
Purdue Department of Entomology


Posted on June 21st, 2021 in Forestry, Webinar | No Comments »

A program launched across the U.S. on June 1st by the company NCX (formerly called SilviaTerra) is enrolling woodland owners at no cost. The company pays landowners for the carbon captured through postponing harvest for one year.

Landowners can go to the NCX landowners website to learn more about the program and enroll. Simply create an account and identify your property boundaries and submit your application for an analysis of your land’s potential.

NCX uses a large database of US forest inventory to analyze and model harvesting and market information, and will determine the risk of harvest for your property in the next year. If their data shows there is “X” tons of carbon in your trees at risk of harvest in the next year, and you sign up and defer that harvest for a year, you can be paid for the carbon captured by that deferment. If they determine there is no harvest at risk, a landowner can’t participate. A landowner can also choose to defer a portion of the total, which would allow them to thin or harvest some of the property, while deferring other areas.

When considering whether to sign up for this or any carbon payment program, landowners should consider a few factors:

  • What are my property objectives? Will this program interfere with other plans for the property? It may be that capturing and getting paid for carbon can happen seamlessly within your plans, but always evaluate the impacts of your activities.
  • What does my management plan suggest should happen and when? Straying too much from your plan should be evaluated, and perhaps consider revising your plan if you revise a planned harvest.
  • Are there other carbon programs that are a better fit for my property and objectives? There are not a lot of options to date, but a few programs are piloting or considering expansion. And congress and state legislatures are considering bills that may provide different incentives in the future.
  • What are the tax implications? Carbon payments may be treated as ordinary income.
  • Enrollment is a legal contract with obligations that the landowner must deliver. Penalties may occur if the landowner doesn’t defer the harvest as contracted. Always read the fine print and consider factors that might influence your ability to fulfill your obligation.

Resources:
A New Carbon Program for Hardwood Landowners, June 15th, 2021, Webinar, Walnut Council YouTube Channel
An Introduction to Forest Carbon Offset Markets, Publication, North Carolina State Extension
NCX carbon program for landowners, NCX Carbon Exchange – Landowners
Selling Forest Carbon, Practical Guide PDF, UMass Amherst – MassWoods
Family Forests Carbon program, American Forest Foundation
Carbon market policy initiatives, American Forest Foundation

Liz Jackson, Manager Walnut Council / IN Forestry Woodland Owners Association (IFWOA) & Engage Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Join Lenny Farlee, Purdue FNR Extension Forester, as he explains why the typical thinking of what is a tree and what is a shrub isn’t always simple as far as looking for the “single” trunk to call it a tree. There is some crossover. Lenny shares the different ways to identify if it is a shrub and then the various species in Indiana.

 

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning, or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
101 Trees in Indiana, Amazon
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Playlist

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forest and Natural Resources


Join Lenny Farlee, Purdue FNR Extension Forester, as he goes over the different principles used to identify various trees in Indiana. Lenny will provide examples of species to practice using those principles for identification.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning, or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
101 Trees in Indiana, Amazon
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Playlist

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forest and Natural Resources

 

 


Posted on August 19th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Invasive Plant Species, Plants, Webinar | No Comments »

In this webinar, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee talks about methods of controlling invasive plant species, which include: preventing invasions, early detection and rapid response, control techniques, accessing resources and assistance.

Don’t forget to fill out the Invasive Plants Threaten our Woodlands Part 2, Identification survey after watching the video to share your suggestions or other forest topics you would like to see and to help us learn more about you.

Check out Invasive Plants Threaten our Woodlands: Part 1, Identification (video). This video is also available on Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on August 19th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Webinar, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee talks about what woodland management means, defining your goals and objectives, invasive species control, timber stand improvement (TSI) and finding appropriate professional help in this webinar.

Note: evaluation slide at end is incorrect. Follow this link for proper evaluation: https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3OQLWbE7gfMBjWl

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Invasive Plant Species Identification, Video
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
A Landowner’s Guide to Sustainable Forestry: Part 7: Managing for a Diversity of Value-Added Forest Products, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Join Purdue Extension forestry specialist Lenny Farlee and John Woodmansee, extension educator, as they share:
– Why should I sell timber?
– Getting help from a professional forester
– Common concerns when selling timber
– Best management practices loggers use
– Types of tree sales, pros and cons of each
– Tax considerations
– Potential cost sharing opportunities through USDA
– Where to get additional information

Several resources are listed at the end of the webinar for those who may be considering timber sales or for those who may be thinking of purchasing land in the future, or may inherit land with woodlands.  These resources will guide you as you meet your goals.

Please fill out the evaluation so we can learn more about you and your woodland management needs.

Resources
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners: Sealed Bid (FNR 592 WV), Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners: EQIP (FNR 587 WV), Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Find an Indiana Forester
Marketing Timber, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Determining Tax Basis of Timber, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

John Woodmansee, Extension Educator, Whitely County
Purdue Extension


Welcome to the Nature of Teaching Professional Development Webinar Series: Ecotoxicology Part 1. This webinar shared by Rod Williams, a professor and extension wildlife specialist with Purdue University Extension, and Jason Hoverman, an associate professor at Purdue University and a co-author on the unit on ecotoxicology, discusses the principles of ecotoxicology, contaminants, and threats to the freshwater ecosystems.

This webinar shares the resources teachers, and K-12 leaders, need to teach students about ecotoxicology. This state standard curriculum includes free downloads of posters, photos, charts, data sheets, and fun activities along with the opportunity to receive a Certificate of Completion

Resources
The Nature of Teaching: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Health, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Benefits of Connecting with Nature, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Disease Ecology, The Education Store
Resourceful Animal Relationships, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching, Youtube Channel
Nature of Teaching, Website

Rod Williams, Professor of Wildlife Science
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Jason Hoverman, Associate Professor Vertebrate Ecology
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on July 9th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Plants, Urban Forestry, Webinar | No Comments »

This webinar titled “Tree Selection for the Landscape” by FNR Urban Forestry Specialist Lindsey Purcell talks about the tree selection process including the benefits of trees, urban tree planting, purpose for planting, environmental considerations, proper placement and utility considerations, along with many shared resources.

Please visit the Tree Selection for the Landscape Survey after you watch the video so we can learn more about you and feel free to share your suggestions for future topics.

Resources
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Selection for the “Un-natural” Environment, The Education Store
Tree Pruning Essentials, Video & Document
Tree Pruning: What Do Trees Think?, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment, The Education Store
Tree Installation Process and Practices, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 1: Choosing a Tree, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 2: Planting Your Tree, The Education Store
Planting Problems: Planting Too Deep, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel

Lindsey Purcell, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on July 8th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Plants, Urban Forestry, Webinar | No Comments »

Purdue urban forester Lindsey Purcell shares tips for tree pruning for the landscape, including knowing why you are pruning, how to prune and how to help the tree heal properly.

Please visit the Tree Pruning for the Landscape Survey after you watch the video so we can learn more about you and feel free to share your suggestions for future topics.

Resources
Tree Pruning Essentials, Video & Document
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Pruning: What Do Trees Think?, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment, The Education Store
Tree Installation Process and Practices, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 1: Choosing a Tree, The Education Store
Tree Planting Part 2: Planting Your Tree, The Education Store
Planting Problems: Planting Too Deep, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel

Lindsey Purcell, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


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