Got Nature? Blog

Posted on September 25th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee shares about the pecan, one of Indiana’s native hickories. Learn how to identify this species by more than just its nut production.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Hickory and Pecan Species, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Carya illinoinensis (Pecan), Purdue Arboretum Explorer
Pecan, Native Trees of Indiana River Park, Purdue Fort Wayne
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Oak Shelterwood, Video

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on September 25th, 2020 in Forestry, Forests and Street Trees, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »
Get to know one of our small Indiana trees, good for landscaping, that has purple flowers in the summer and pink fruit in the fall. Meet the American Burning Bush or Wahoo. Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee shares about where you can find this species, and more identifying characteristics.
The American Burning Bush is a native and desirable small tree found in our Indiana woodlands, not to be confused with winged burning bush, which is an exotic and invasive shrub that has escaped into woodlands from landscape plantings.

Posted on September 24th, 2020 in Forestry, Forests and Street Trees, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to one of the bright flowering stars of spring, the Redbud. This native tree is known for its pink and lavender flowers in early spring, its heart-shaped leaves and for its home along the edge of open fields and brushy areas.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Eastern Redbud, Purdue Fort Wayne
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on September 24th, 2020 in Forestry, Forests and Street Trees, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to the flowering dogwood, a species with simple leaves with an interesting venation pattern on them, white blossoms in the spring and red to maroon foliage in the fall.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
ID That TreePlaylist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Flowering Dogwood, The Purdue Arboretum Explorer
Flowering Dogwood Doesn’t Flower, Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory, Purdue College of Agriculture
Flowering Dogwood, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue – Fort Wayne
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on September 23rd, 2020 in Forestry, Forests and Street Trees, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

Meet the Eastern Hemlock, one of Indiana’s native conifers, which is typically found near canyons, revines and steep slopes. They can grow to be more than 100 feet tall and to be 200-300 years old. Learn more from Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee below.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
ID That TreePlaylist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Eastern Hemlock, The Purdue Arboretum Explorer
Eastern Hemlock, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue – Fort Wayne
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources



Posted on September 23rd, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Plants, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Blackberry is a great wildlife plant as the berries are eaten by many different songbirds and wildlife, but this plant also has an important role for wildlife. In this video by wildlife extension specialist Jarred Brooke, you will learn what part this important plant plays in helping wildlife in our native grasslands.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Blackberry, Feng Lab, Purdue University
Bramble issues, Facts for Fancy Fruits, Purdue University
Wildlife Habitat Hint, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resouces
Invasive Species, Playlist
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Habitat Help LIVE Q&A – Native Grasses and Forbs for Wildlife, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Renovating Native Warm-Season Grass Stands for Wildlife: A Land Manager’s Guide, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on September 21st, 2020 in Forestry, Forests and Street Trees, How To, Plants, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to the Devil’s Walking Stick, a small tree from the ginseng family found in southern Indiana. It is identifiable by thorns or spikes along the stem, unique doubly compound leaves, and large clusters of small white flowers.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Devil’s Walking Stick, Purdue Arboretum Explorer
Devil’s Walking Stick, Native Trees of Indiana River Park, Purdue Fort Wayne
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


In this edition of Wildlife Habitat Hint, Purdue wildlife extension specialist Jarred Brooke shares methods to control the invasive sericea lespedeza. This plant species, though was once used for erosion control and mineland reclamation, is too invasive and of little wildlife value.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Sericea Lespedeza: Plague on the Prairie, Purdue Extension
Wildlife Habitat Hint, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resouces
Invasive Species, Playlist
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Habitat Help LIVE Q&A – Native Grasses and Forbs for Wildlife, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Renovating Native Warm-Season Grass Stands for Wildlife: A Land Manager’s Guide, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


WalnutAnthracnose

Brown or black spots with yellowing are signs of anthracnose.

This time of year, many black walnut trees’ leaves may have black spots, turn yellow and begin to drop. This is commonly known as anthracnose, a fungal disease that causes trees to drop their leaves prematurely.

Anthracnose is worsened by wet weather, and some trees are more genetically susceptible to anthracnose than others. It is not fatal but can look like a serious problem. The absence of leaves can slow a tree’s growth and can reduce the nut crop, although by this time of year growth may have slowed or stopped for the season. It can also weaken

Anthracnose generally begins as small circular brown to black areas on the leaflets. Over the season those spots expand and cause leaf drop. There are a few other leaf spot diseases of black walnut, see the references below for descriptions of those diseases.

Although unsightly, there is no need for further action if you are growing timber and have anthracnose in a plantation or woods. It can be an issue if you are growing walnuts for a nut crop, and there are resources and spray products to help manage the fungus in those situations.

If you have individual landscaping trees and want to limit anthracnose spread there are few things you can do:

  • Gather fallen leaves and compost or remove them from the site.
  • Control weeds which could carry the fungus.
  • Plant walnut trees where there is good air circulation.
  • Keep the trees healthy and vigorous by managing soil fertility and thinning competition as needed.

Resources
Walnut Anthracnose, Walnut Notes, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Planting and Care of Fine Hardwood Seedlings. Paula M. Pijut (ed.):
Diseases in Hardwood Tree Plantings, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Planting Hardwood Seedlings in the Central Hardwood Region, The Education Store
Regenerating Hardwoods in the Central Hardwood Region:  Soils, The Education Store
Fertilizing, Pruning, and Thinning Hardwood Plantations, The Education Store
Weed Competition Control in Hardwood Plantations, The Education Store
Resources and Assistance Available for Planting Hardwood Seedlings, The Education Store

Liz Jackson, Manager Walnut Council / IN Forestry Woodland Owners Association (IFWOA) & Engage Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


On this edition of ID That Tree, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to the northern white cedar, a native conifer that is used for ornamental, windbreak and reforestation purposes. This evergreen has distinct scale like foliage which is soft to the touch. He shares how to distinguish it from the eastern red cedar.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
ID That TreePlaylist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
ID That Tree: Eastern Red Cedar, Video
Thuja occidentalis, The Purdue Arboretum Explorer
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Appraisal and the Value of Trees, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


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