Got Nature? Blog

Posted on February 19th, 2024 in Forestry, Plants, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

IN DNR-Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology Report: Jarred Spokowsky, Nursery Inspector & Compliance Officer, encourages professionals and enthusiast beekeepers to check out the new Honey Bee Nutrition-A Review and Guide to Supplemental Feeding which he shared in theHoney Bee Nutrition Guide Cover February 2024 Report. The guide lists useful information and an interesting summary of research as it relates to current supplements. “You will also find real-world feedback from multiple migratory operations from around the country and what their nutritional supplement routines are,” states Jarred Spokowsky.

This guide is presented by the Honey Bee Health Coalition which brings together beekeepers, growers, researchers, government agencies, agribusinesses, conservation groups, manufacturers, and consumer brands to improve the health of honey bees.

Jarred also shared the upcoming seminar that many will want to attend March 6, 2024, presented by the Project Apis m. The seminar title is From Forage to Feeding, Honey Bee Health Seminar.

You will be able to listen to the following professionals:

  • Dr. Priyadarshini Chakrabarti Basu
    Mississippi State University
  • Dr. Diana Cox-Foster
    USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit, Logan Utah
  • Dr. Vanessa Corby-Harris
    USDA-ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson. AZ

If you would like to subscribe to the informal report by the Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology view the Entomology Weekly Review web page.

Resources:
Social Bees and Wasps, The Education Store
Indiana Beekeepers Swarm List, Indiana DNR
New Invasive Predator of Honeybees, Purdue Landscape Report
Protecting Pollinators: Why Should We Care About Pollinators?, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Ask The Expert: What’s Buzzing or Not Buzzing About Pollinators , Purdue Extension – Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Purdue Pollinator Protection publication series, Purdue Extension Entomology
Invasive Species, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Report Invasive Species, Purdue Invasive Species
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Pest Management, The Education Store
Subscribe Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Jarred Spokowsky, Nursery Inspector & Compliance Officer
Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology

Diana Evans, Extension and Web Communications Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


State of Indiana Executive Department of Indianapolis Proclamation, Invasive Species Awareness Week, Feb. 25-March 2, 2024.Governor Eric Holcomb has proclaimed February 25th to March 2nd as 2024 Invasive Species Awareness Week in Indiana.

This serves as an important reminder for Hoosiers to be aware and report potentially devastating invasives.

This proclamation states “invasive aquatic, riparian and terrestrial species influence the productivity, value and management of land and water resources in Indiana and the cost to prevent, monitor and control invasive species costs Indiana millions annually and after habitat destruction, invasive species are a great threat to biodiversity and threaten the survival of native plants and animals and interfere with ecosystem functions by changing processes like fire, nutrient flow and flooding”.

It continues with “invasive species impede industry, threaten agriculture, endanger human health and are becoming increasingly harder to control as a result of rapid global commercialization and human travel; and invasive species are as significant threat to almost half of the native species currently listed as federally endangered.”

As Invasive Species Awareness Week starts Sunday, February 25th, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IN DNR), Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources and the Indiana Invasive Species Council will answer any questions you may have.

For Questions:
Ask an Expert, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources
Invasive Species – Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Indiana Invasive Species Council – Includes: IDNR, Purdue Department of Entomology and Professional Partners
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)

Report and Learn More About Invasive Species –
Great Lakes Early Detection Network App (GLEDN) – The Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health
EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System
Purdue University Report Invasive Species, College of Agriculture

Check Out Our Invasive Species Videos –
Subscribe: Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Invasive Species YouTube Video Playlist includes:

More Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Video Series –
Woodland Management Moment:

Woodland Stewardship for Landowners:

ID That Tree:

More Resources –
FNR Extension Publications, The Education Store:

Purdue Landscape Report:

FNR Extension Got Nature? Blog:

Don’t Miss These Resources:
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What Are Invasive Species and Why Should I Care?, Purdue Extension-FNR Got Nature? Blog
Emerald Ash Borer Information Network, Purdue University and Partners
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources

 


Are you an Indiana teacher who is looking to incorporate natural resources, forest ecology and forest management into your curriculum?

Apply now for the Indiana Natural Resources Teacher Institute, an immersive multi-day professional development workshop that will bring 18 teachers from across the state to Morgan-Monroe State Forest to see firsthand how forestry works in Indiana.  Sessions from June 24 to 28 will include tours of public and private forest lands, forest industry facilities, and information about forestry research in Indiana.Photo from HEENewsletter

The goal of the institute, which is co-hosted by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Extension, is to provide Indiana teachers with knowledge, skills and tools to effectively teach their students about forest ecology and forest management practices.  The forest environment becomes the basis for integrating the learning of many subject areas, including environmental science, biology, natural resources, and social science.  The NRTI incorporates STEM concepts and principles throughout the sessions and empowers educators to foster conceptual learning, critical thinking and decision-making skills in their classrooms.

The Natural Resources Teacher Institute emphasizes the importance of conservation of natural resources with special attention given to Indiana’s forests and forest products.  The project-based approach integrates hands-on study of the natural and cultural resources of the local community, addresses concepts in ecology, sense of place, civics, economics and forest land management and stewardship.

Participants will develop a curriculum project about forests or forestry for their classrooms.  Participants will earn 30+ Professional Growth Points and receive a stipend upon documentation of implementing curriculum project. Concepts are linked to the Indiana Learning Standards and participants are provided resources and training from Project Learning Tree as well as forestry equipment kits.

The 2024 edition of the NRTI will begin on Monday, June 24 at 1:00 pm and conclude on Friday, June 28 at noon. The base of operations will be the Forestry Training Center at Morgan-Monroe State Forest near Martinsville. Teachers will stay in the Training Center, sharing one of the 10 sleeping rooms.  Meals will be provided.

Interested educators must complete an application and submit it by the deadline of March 22, 2024.  Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, 2022. The institute is limited to 18 participants per session. There is no cost for participants. Those accepted will be required to pay a $50 deposit, which will be refunded at the end of the program. Participants will receive a stipend when documentation is provided that they have implemented their curriculum project with their students.

  • Attendees must be available to participate in all days of the institute. (Individual participation only – spouses and/or children, etc., are not permitted.)
  • Participants must be able to actively participate in all activities, which will include walking, hiking, summer temperatures, insects, etc. Reasonable accommodations will be made for individuals with disabilities who may need assistance.
  • Participants must have the ability to implement a curriculum project in their educational setting.

For more information and to request an application for the NRTI, contact Project Learning Tree Coordinator Lexi Eiler via email at leiler@dnr.in.gov or via phone at 463-253-8835.

To get a glimpse at the curriculum and also feedback from past participants, read NRTI Takes Forestry to the Classroom.

To register, please fill out the NRTI Application.

Resources:
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Facebook Page
Project Learning Tree
Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry
The Nature of Teaching, Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, The Education Store
Trees of the Midwest Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel

Indiana Forestry Educational Foundation, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Natural Resources Teacher Institute Takes Forestry to the Classroom, Purdue FNR News
Purdue Extension

Lexi Eiler, Coordinator
Indiana Project Learning Tree

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 9th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Podcasts, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

The podcast series housed within the Natural Research University network delivers expert-based knowledge of natural resource management. The network is a partnership between the extension services at several land-grant university, including Mississippi State Extension Service, University of Florida Extension, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Purdue Extension. Funding for the project comes from the Renewable Resources Extension Act.Habitat University Cover Page

Check out the new podcast in the Habitat University, hosted by Jarred Brooke and Adam Janke, discusses the science behind wildlife habitat management and how landowners and manages can use different habitat management practices to improve their land for wildlife. This podcast is part of the larger podcast network Natural Resources University (NRU), funded by the Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA).

In the final episode of this second season, Jarred and Adam review the conversations we’ve had on the theme of private lands habitat conservation, discuss some things “left on the bone,” and share with the listeners where Habitat University is heading in the new year! Be sure to check out the previous episodes in the podcast, including those from Season 2 discussed in this episode, and Season 1 if you haven’t already! And as always please help us improve the podcast by taking this Habitat University Listener Feedback Survey.

To listen to this episode, please visit Habitat University.

The Natural Resources University podcasts are available through the individual podcast websites, through the NRU podcast main hub or wherever podcasts are available to download.

Check out this article regarding the NRU groups award received: Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources News & Stories, Natural Resources University Podcasts Earn ANREP Gold Award .

More Resources:
Ask an Expert: Pond Management, Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube playlist
Pond Management: Managing Fish Populations, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Yellow Perch Farmed Fish Fact Sheet, The Education Store
Frogs and Toads of Indiana, The Education Store
Snakes and Lizards of Indiana, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Frost Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs with a Drone (UAV), Purdue Extension-FNR
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store
Invasive Plants: Impact on Environment and People, The Education Store
Sustainable Communities, Purdue Extension
Ask the Expert: Turtles and Snakes video, Got Nature? post
ID That Tree, Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist
Woodland Management Moment , Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube playlist

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on February 9th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Webinar, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Many forest landowners own and manage their land for hunted wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, wild turkey, and a host of other game species. This presentation titled Managing Your Woods for Game Species by Jarred Brooke, Extension Wildlife Specialist for Purdue University, discusses how forest management can be tailored to enhance habitat for game species and how forest management focused on game species can provide habitat for a suite of non-game wildlife.

The Toms, Tines, and Tanagers is a webinar event hosted by the Illinois Extension, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences.

 

 

Resources:
Hunting Guide for 2023-2024, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
How to Score Your White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
White-Tailed Deer Post Harvest Collection, video, The Education Store
Age Determination in White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store
How to Build a Plastic Mesh Deer Exclusion Fence, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Bovine Tuberculosis in Wild White-tailed Deer, The Education Store
Frost Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs with a Drone (UAV), Purdue Extension-FNR
Help With Wild Turkey Populations, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Turkey Brood Reporting, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Wild Turkey, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Wild Turkey Hunting Biology and Management, Indian Department of Natural Resources (IDNR)
Subscribe to Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources YouTube Channel, Wildlife Playlist

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Illinois Extension, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences


scent station photo

During K-12 Educator workshops, participants learn how to implement TNT curriculum such as building scent stations (pictured above). Photo by Jarred Brooke.

Agricultural & Natural Resources: Richard Louv’s words, “Time in nature is not leisure time, it’s an essential investment in our children’s health (and also, by the way, in our own),” underscores the critical role of nature in children’s well-being. Inspired by Louv’s concept of “nature deficit disorder,” The Nature of Teaching (TNT) was established in 2009 to connect youth to nature. The Nature of Teaching became an ANR signature program in 2019.

The primary focus of TNT is to engage K-12 youth with nature to foster environmental awareness and reap the positive health benefits of outdoor experiences. The program achieves this by integrating nature-based education into the school environment through standards-based curriculum. Through this, TNT not only connects students with nature but also provides lessons that align with Common Core and Next Generation Science standards.

During K-12 Educator workshops, participants learn how to implement TNT curriculum such as building scent stations (pictured above). Photo by Jarred Brooke.

The curriculum of The Nature of Teaching is divided into three key areas: Wildlife, Health and Wellness, and Food Waste. The Wildlife curriculum enhances students’ understanding of the natural world, while the Health and Wellness curriculum emphasizes the health benefits of connecting with nature. The Food Waste curriculum explores the environmental impact of food waste. Educators have access to more than 60 free standards-based lesson plans suitable for K-12 classrooms. In addition, TNT includes five informal curriculum units that are not standards-based and are more activity-focused. These informal lessons are great for field days and after-school type programs.

tnt union county hellbender adaptations

Veronica Bullock teaching a TNT lesson, Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, in a Union County classroom. Photo by Jennifer Logue.

Extension educators around the state have delivered TNT lessons to K-12 students since TNT became a signature program in 2019. In 2022 alone, 2,424 K-12 students benefited from TNT instruction, highlighting an impressive average knowledge increase of 16-31% in natural resources topics. The Nature of Teaching further supports K-12 educators through teacher workshops, with 17 teachers attending a workshop at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge in 2022. Attendees reported a significant boost in knowledge and confidence in connecting youth with nature.

Veronica Bullock teaching a TNT lesson, Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, in a Union County classroom. Photo by Jennifer Logue.

As part of the signature program, Extension educators deliver three educational sessions using TNT formal curriculum to at least 15 students. Educators are also asked to provide students with pre- and post-tests to better understand student learning outcomes. Most educators deliver TNT in their local school system over several weeks. However, others deliver TNT through school clubs, after-school programs, or other avenues. The signature program requirements for Nature of Teaching are on the ANR Intranet. Educators are encouraged to work across program areas to deliver TNT.

Starting this year, The Nature of Teaching will be co-led by Jarred Brooke, Extension wildlife specialist, and Veronica Bullock, ANR educator, Franklin County. Jarred and Veronica have a long history with the TNT program and are excited to lead TNT into the future.

For educators who are interested in TNT, we will host a webinar on April 2 at 10 a.m. EDT to discuss future changes to the Nature of Teaching Signature program. You can register for the webinar here.

To see this article and others, please visit ANR Newsletter-February 2024.

Visit Nature of Teaching to learn more and explore the different lessons.

Resources:
Virtual Workshops, Nature of Teaching
Nature of Teaching, Website, Purdue College of Agriculture
The Nature of Teaching, YouTube channel
Transporting Food Waste, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Benefits of Connecting with Nature, The Education Store
Nature of Teaching: Common Mammals of Indiana, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste Solutions, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste and the Environment, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, The Education Store
Trees of the Midwest Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel
Adaptations For Aquatic Amphibians Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel

Agriculture & Natural Resources (ANR)

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Veronica Bullock, ANR Extension Educator
Purdue Extension Franklin County


Posted on February 6th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Plants, Publication, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension: This Purdue Extension 2023 Impact Report features stories that highlight partnerships that have served our state’s producers, supported residents in becoming healthier, built more resilient communities and prepared Indiana’s youth to take that first step to their giant leap. We will continue to bring the science, technology and resources to all 92 counties as Indiana’s educational partner for life and as an extension of the world class institution we represent: Purdue University.2023 Impact Report Cover

Check out the Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resource highlights on the following programs:

  • Todays Teens Lead the Way in Sharing Love of STEM
  • Guiding Farm Families Down the Road of Succession Planning
  • Providing Support for Families Through Seasons of Change
  • Addressing Substance Use Recovery Together
  • Workforce Development Efforts Target a Broad Range of Users
  • Training International Farmers in Food Preservation and Processing
  • Farmer-Driven Research Creates Solutions

Resources:
Nature of Teaching, Purdue College of Agriculture
Community Development, Purdue Extension
Purdue Extension
Family Programs, Purdue Extension – Health and Human Sciences
Taking Action to Address Substance Use in Communities (TASC), Purdue Extension
Diversified Farming and Food Systems, Purdue Extension
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
A Woodland Management Moment, FNR – Ext Playlist
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Community Planning, FNR -Ext Playlist

Purdue Extension


Wild Bulletin, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Fish and Wildlife: Looking to build habitat that benefits wildlife species near you? February is a great time to complete winter habitat improvement projects, such as frost seeding native forbs, edge feathering forestsnow covered milkweed crop boundaries, prescribe-burning warm-season grass, and removing invasive species.

DNR’s wildlife habitat fact sheets can teach you the best techniques for your desired management practices. Need more information for your unique property? Contact your district’s Wildlife Biologist, who can meet with you to provide suggestions on wildlife habitat improvements based on your specific goals.

To learn more please visit DNR: Wildlife Habitat Fact Sheets.

Subscribe to Wild Bulletin.

Resources:
Frost Seeding to Establish Wildlife Food Plots and Native Grass and Forb Plantings – The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Tips for Evaluating a First Year Native Grass and Forb Planting, Got Nature? – Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Tips for Evaluating a First Year Native Grass and Forb Plantings, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Calibrating a No-Till Drill for Conservation Plantings and Wildlife Food Plots – The Education Store
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Project Overview & Drone Setup, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Seed Mixing, Loading the Hopper, Programming the Route, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Drone Seeding Native Grasses and Forbs: Recapping the Project, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Renovating Native Warm-season Grass Stands for Wildlife, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Ordering Seedlings from the State Forest Nursery System, Got Nature? – Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR)
Designing Hardwood Tree Plantings for Wildlife – The Education Store
ID That Tree – YouTube Playlist
Forest Management for Reptiles and Amphibians: A Technical Guide for the Midwest, The Education Store
Ask the Expert: Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Birds and Salamander Research, Purdue Extension – FNR
A Template for Your Wildlife Habitat Management Plan, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube channel
Winter Weather Tree Tips, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


In 2023, our FNR Extension website featured stories on topics ranging from wildlife identification, concerns in forestry, urban forestry issues and aquaculture how-to guides. Here are the top stories our FNR Extension readers were interested in last year from archival favorites to new publications on our Got Nature! blog.

FROM THE ARCHIVES – ARTICLES ORIGINALLY POSTED PRIOR TO 2023tree trunk damage wounds and healing

1 – Tree Wounds and Healing — Trees are incredible survivors in spite of the challenges from pests of all kinds, including us! They are vulnerable to injuries such as mechanical wounds from lawn equipment, vehicles and ice. Pruning results in an intentional wound which is of importance to consider. Tree owners and managers need to prune trees to maintain aesthetic characteristics, remove infected limbs, reduce risk, or improve structural stability. Proper pruning practice and understanding tree wounds can minimize the impact of creating wounds on trees.

2 – Question: Can Tree Roots Cause Damage to a Home’s Foundation? — A reader asked this question regarding a pin oak tree that is within 10 feet of their house after receiving  A certified arborist took a look at it and said that he would like to use an Air Knife to expose the roots near the foundation (a walkout basement) to determine if the roots are causing damage and/or need to be pruned, or whether the tree needs to be removed since it is situated too close to the house.squirrel

3 – Question: I Saw A Squirrel with No Fur on Its Neck, Both Backside and Underneath. What Is This? — People can be taken aback by the sight of squirrels missing hair. Sightings of partially furred squirrels is not unusual with warmer temperatures experienced through the winter. Like many wildlife issues, the cause of hair loss in squirrels is not easy to answer and often results in more questions than answers. In most situations, hair loss does not impact populations of squirrels.

4 – Be on the Watch for EHD in Deer — In August 2019, residents were warned to be on the watch for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Diseases (EHD) in deer after a white-tailed deer in Clarke County, Indiana tested positive for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD), and potential EHD cases had been reported in 26 other Indiana counties. Here are a few things you should know about how EHD, how to spot it, and how to report it.tiger salamander

5 – Question: Are Carpenter Ants Harmful to My Tree? — Carpenter ants are very common inside trees, especially on larger, mature trees that are hollow with cavities. They nest in rotted, decayed wood, although some nests may extend into sound heartwood in the center of the tree. Carpenter ant presence is an indication of rotting wood, and infested trees should be checked to determine whether the rot has weakened the tree enough that it has become a risk of failure.

6 – Question: Why Are There So Many Acorns This Year? — If you have ever noticed acorns so numerous that you could not take a step without crushing several, you may be asking the question, “why are there so many acorns?” Some answers to this question can be found in the physiology and ecology of trees and their relationship to wildlife.

7 – It Is A Salamander. No, It Is a Lizard. Are They Different? — Salamanders are often mistaken for lizards, but the two groups are very different. Learn the differences between lizards and salamanders, how to identify each and more.slime flux silver maple

8 – Question: Blue Spruce is Dying, What Can I Do? — A reader sent in a question asking about a 40-year old spruce which is dying in the middle. There was a concern about Rhizosphaera needle cast as well as questions about fungus control sprays or alternative fungicide treatments.

9 – Slime Flux of Trees — Slime flux (also known as wet wood) is a dark, foul-smelling and unsightly seepage of sap from tree trunks. The disease is not usually a serious problem but the appearance can be alarming. Learn about the symptoms of slime flux, diagnosis and prevention measure.

10 – What Do Trees Do In the Winter? — Do they freeze up like unprotected water pipes? Or burst when it gets below freezing? Yes, the below-ground parts of a tree are kept insulated by mulch, soil and a layer of snow, and that is important to survival, but the exposed parts of a tree are not protected.

To see the full article, please visit FNR News & Stories.

Resources
Tree Pruning: What Do Trees Think?, The Education Store
Mechanical Damage to Trees: Mowing and Maintenance Equipment, The Education Store
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Diseases in Hardwood Tree Plantings , The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Iron Chlorosis of Trees and Shrubs, The Education Store
Purdue Landscape Report, Website
Winterize Your Trees, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Defect Identification, The Education Store
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
Urban Forestry, Purdue Extension – FNR playlist

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Videos on the Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Extension YouTube channel received more than 213,000 views in 2023. The Top 50 videos included 47 editions of ID That Tree, an informational series by Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee, as well as a webinar by Farlee on How to Identify Trees in Indiana. The remaining two videos in the Top 50 were an instructional video about a common urban tree planting problem by former Purdue Extension urban forester Lindsey Purcell, and a video about the use of prescribed fire on the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment.

Below we will count down the 10 most viewed Purdue FNR Extension videos of 2023 with a few bonus videos sure to shoot up the list in future years.

Our most viewed video in 2023 was ID That Tree: Black Walnut with a whopping 18,156 views. This video has been seen more than 28,000 times since its debut in September of 2020.

1 – ID That Tree: Black Walnut — Learn the identifying characteristics of the black walnut tree, also known as the American black walnut or eastern black walnut, including pairs of leaflets running down each stem, long running ridges on the bark, and round nuts that have a very strong exterior. This sun-loving tree also needs high quality soil.

Our second most viewed video is ID That Tree: American Elm. This video, which debuted in June 2020, was watched 16,779 times in 2023, and has been viewed 33,456 times overall.

2 – ID That Tree: American Elm — In this tree identification series you will see how American elm leaves have jagged edges with a large tooth and then smaller teeth like edges on top of it. Find out why these trees are not as easy to find as they used to be.

Number three on our most viewed list is ID That Tree: Black Oak. This video, which debuted in March 2021, was seen 5,773 times in 2023.

3 – ID That Tree: Black Oak — In this episode of ID That Tree, we continue to get to know the oak groups, this time focusing on the black oak species. Deep sinuses on the leaves and shinier coat, a dark blocky bark and acorns with loose shingle-like plates on the cap are some key identifiers to separate it from the red oak and others.

Number four on the most viewed videos list was ID That Tree: Invasive White Mulberry. This video, which debuted in September 2021, was seen 5,197 times in 2023.

4 – ID That Tree: Invasive White Mulberry — On this episode of ID That Tree, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to a non-native invasive tree that is widespread across the state, white mulberry. Key identifying characteristics to separate it from its native cousin red mulberry are shiny variable leaves and where the species grows, near fence rows, hedgerows and other waste areas. The red mulberry has larger leaves that are duller in color with a sandpapery texture, and the species is often found in the forest understory.

Fifth on our countdown of top videos of 2023 is ID That Tree: Pignut Hickory. This video, which debuted in March 2022, was seen 4,569 times in 2023.

5 – ID That Tree: Pignut Hickory — In this edition of ID That Tree, meet another member of the hickory family that can found in upland areas, the pignut hickory. This species is identifiable by its five-leaflet compound leaves, its smooth round nut and partially open husk.

Number six on our list of top videos for the year is ID That Tree: Northern Catalpa. This video, which debuted in August 2021, was watched 4,489 times in 2023.

6 – ID That Tree: Northern Catalpa – On this episode of ID That Tree, meet the Northern Catalpa, native to southern Indiana along the Ohio River bottoms. This species, which provides rot resistant wood great for outdoor usage, features beautiful flower clusters in early summer, huge heart shaped leaves in whirled formation, and long bean-like fruit pods.

Number seven on our Purdue FNR Extension most viewed list is ID That Tree: Sassafras. This video, which debuted in July 2020, was seen 4,481 times in 2023. Graduate student Olivia Bingham is researching sassafras wilt in Indiana and needs your help with possible sightings across the state.

7 – ID That Tree: Sassafras — Join Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee as he introduces you to the Sassafras in this edition of ID That Tree. The Sassafras is well known for the tea made from its bark and also for having a variety of shaped leaves from zero to three lobes.

Eighth on our 2023 most watched videos list is ID That Tree: Red Pine. This video, which debuted in February 2022, was seen 4,470 times in 2023.

8 – ID That Tree: Red Pine — This week on ID That Tree, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee introduces you to a non-native conifer that can be found throughout the state, the Red Pine. This species, which enjoys sandy soil, is identifiable by its small, egg-shaped cones, as well as tufts of needle pairs, which can be quite brittle, and orange/reddish bark.

Number nine on our most watched list is ID That Tree: Pin Oak. This video, which debuted in December 2021, was viewed 4,100 times in 2023.

9 – ID That Tree: Pin Oak — On this edition of ID That Tree, meet a species of native Indiana oak from the broad red/black oak family, which is found in bottomlands and areas with imperfectly drained soil, the Pin Oak. This species is recognizable by round acorns with flat scales, bristle-tipped leaves with deep 90-degree angled lobes, and lower branches that angle downward.

Number 10 on our most watched list is ID That Tree: Honey Locust. This video, which debuted in October 2021, was seen 3,510 times in 2023.

10 – ID That Tree: Honey Locust — This native tree comes with its own defense system in very large thorns on the stems and trunk. Meet the honey locust. Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee explains that large, long yellow seed pods that resemble bean pods, the option of single or doubly compound leaves on the same tree and smooth gray bark also help identify this species.

To see the full article, please visit FNR News & Stories.

Resources:
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Got Nature?

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