Got Nature? Blog

In this edition of Wildlife Habitat Hint, Purdue wildlife extension specialist Jarred Brooke shares methods to control the invasive sericea lespedeza. This plant species, though was once used for erosion control and mineland reclamation, is too invasive and of little wildlife value.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
Sericea Lespedeza: Plague on the Prairie, Purdue Extension
Wildlife Habitat Hint, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resouces
Invasive Species, Playlist
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Habitat Help LIVE Q&A – Native Grasses and Forbs for Wildlife, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel
Renovating Native Warm-Season Grass Stands for Wildlife: A Land Manager’s Guide, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Posted on August 19th, 2020 in Forestry, How To, Invasive Plant Species, Plants, Webinar | No Comments »

In this webinar, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee talks about methods of controlling invasive plant species, which include: preventing invasions, early detection and rapid response, control techniques, accessing resources and assistance.

Don’t forget to fill out the Invasive Plants Threaten our Woodlands Part 2, Identification survey after watching the video to share your suggestions or other forest topics you would like to see and to help us learn more about you.

Check out Invasive Plants Threaten our Woodlands: Part 1, Identification (video). This video is also available on Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube channel.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


treePurdue Landscape Report: The Purdue Landscape Report Team will begin a new, free online series that will start every two weeks on Wednesdays at noon Eastern time zone. The topics and speakers will vary each session, so check out the newsletter every two weeks to find out what follows the next day. You’ll have three ways to attend each session, which you can find below.  During each session you’ll be able to ask questions to the speakers on Zoom and Facebook Live. Hope you will join us!

To join the chat on Zoom:
https://purdueextension.zoom.us/j/98937266342

To join the chat via telephone:
US: +1 312 626 6799

To join the chat on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/PurdueLandscapeReport

Resources
Purdue Landscape Report
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Ask The Expert, Playlist
Surface Root Syndrome, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Tree Pruning Essentials, The Education Store

Kyle M Daniel, Nursery & Landscape Outreach Specialist
Purdue Horticulture and Landscape Architecture


Posted on July 9th, 2020 in How To, Invasive Plant Species, Plants, Webinar | No Comments »

If you missed the LIVE Q&A about invasive plant species from June 4, 2020, no worries. Now you can view the archived video on our Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Channel with Lenny Farlee, sustaining hardwood extension specialist, and Liz Jackson, extension specialist with Walnut Council and Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners’ Association (IFWOA), discussing invasive plant species, how to identify them, reporting and controlling techniques.

Here are the resources that were talked about in the video as it will help guide you as you identify invasives.

Resources
Help Stop Invasive Species with PlayCleanGo
Best management practices – Top 10 list (pdf)
Great Lakes Early Detection Network – Download the app at Apple App Store
Eddmaps website – A
 good place to see mapping and keep track of your reports and overall reports by species or location.
Call DEPP 1-866-NOEXOTIC or email depp@dnr.in.gov
Indiana Native Plant Society – Natives to replace invasives
Alternative Option for Invasive Landscape Plants (pdf)
A Guide to the Regulated Terrestrial Plant Species” (pdf)
Calendar of control- seasonality to treatment (pdf)
Now is the time to control Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
County CISMA groups, SICiM website
Work assistance- Contractor list, SICiM website
2020 CISMA Virtual Conference in August – Learn about the impact of invasives, importance of native species, a bit about how to control, SICiM website
Midwest Invasive Plant Network Control Database provides an outline and efficacy rating for control techniques for many common invasive plant species.
Grow Indiana Natives Certification Program – Learn about substitutes for invasive species, Indiana Native Plants Society
Report Invasive
Indiana Invasive Species Council is an excellent doorway site to invasive species information for the state
Contact your local NRCS office for EQIP Brush Control practice, tree planting and habitat development practices, Natural Resources Conservation Service Indiana
Woodland Management Moment – Garlic Mustard, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Woodland Management Moment: Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Video, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Facebook Page

Elizabeth Jackson, with Manager Walnut Council/IN Forestry Woodland Owners’ Association (IFWOA) & Engagement Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Purdue sustaining hardwood extension specialist Lenny Farlee talks about identifying invasive plant species in the webinar below.

Don’t forget to fill out the Invasive Plants Threaten our Woodlands Part 1, Identification survey after watching video to share your suggestions, other forest topics you would like to see and to help us learn more about you.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog
Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


As you decide best management practices for your woodlands, this short video shares how native grape vine can be a positive addition or a detriment depending on your goals. Lenny Farlee, Purdue Extension forester, shows you what it looks like and how it grows even to the tops of the trees.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


Garlic mustard is an invasive herbaceous plant that is shade tolerant and can invade our forest understories. In its second growing season it produces a flower which releases many seeds. In the video below, Purdue Extension forester Lenny Farlee will share what options we have to help control it.

If you have any questions regarding trees, forests, wildlife, wood products or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources Youtube Channel
Invasive Species, Playlist
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store
Woodland Invaders, Got Nature? Blog

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


The Indiana Woodland Steward Homepage has just been updated with a new newsletter and is available to view on the website. Woodland Steward Publication

Highlights from the April Newsletter include:

  • Into the Woods
  • 2019 Indiana Forest Products Price Report and Trend Analysis
  • 2019 Indiana Tree Farmer of the Year

The Indiana Woodland Steward Newsletter is a resource that’s full of a variety of valuable information to foresters, woodland owners, timber marketing specialists and any woodland enthusiasts. The Indiana Woodland Steward Institute is an entity made from 11 organizations within the state including Purdue UniversityIndiana DNR, and Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association that works to promote best usage practices of Indiana’s woodland resources through their Woodland Steward publication.

Check out the IWS website to stay current in the world of forestry and receive their free e-newsletter by subscribing at IWS Subscribe. Feel free to browse archived articles dating back to 1992 for more information.

Resources
Indiana Woodland Steward, IWS Newsletter Homepage
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store

Brian MacGowan, Extension Wildlife Specialist
Department of Forestry & Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on April 15th, 2020 in Invasive Plant Species, Plants | No Comments »

Many of our favorite plants have multiple personalities. There is a good side and a bad side, shown especially when they escape the landscape and spread to our native areas, becoming invasive. When it comes to invasive plants in landscapes, there is good news and bad news. The bad news is that invasive plants are planted intentionally as ornamentals, and several species known to be invasive are readily available for sale from nurseries and garden centers. The good news is that there are many beautiful plants to choose from that are not invasive. Indeed, while many of the most picturesque garden plants are not native to the Midwest, the majority are not invasive. For example, hosta, smoke tree, boxwoods, Japanese tree lilacs, dwarf shrub junipers, and serviceberry are all non-native to the region but are not known to be invasive. However, brad ford pear, red barberry, burning bush and other “go-to” landscape plants are damaging our natural ecosystem by establishing themselves where they really aren’t welcome. These plants should be avoided and even considered for removal and replacement.

Several professional landscape and nursery organizations have taken the charge in eliminating these harmful plants. They believe invasive species adversely affect the integrity of ecosystems and cause both environmental degradation and economic harm. Invasive species – whether they are plants, animals, fungi, or insects – may cause deterioration of native habitats and plant communities as well as damage to designed and managed ecosystems. Because invasives reduce biodiversity and disrupt the healthy structure and function of both native and human ecosystems, planners, contractors, arborists, landscape architects and other green industry professionals should not introduce or support the use of known invasive species. And, where they are already existing, steps should be taken to eradicate them.

Read the publication Commercial Greenhouse and Nursery Production: Alternative Options for Invasive Landscape Plants for more information. Also, here are several online resources for details on invasive pests:
Midwest Invasive Plant Network
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Invasive.org
Indiana Wildlife Federation

To view more Got Nature? posts on Invasive Species:
Woodland Invaders
What are invasive species and why should I care?

Resources
Indiana DNR Division of Forestry
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Commercial Greenhouse and Nursery Production: Alternative Options for Invasive Landscape Plants, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
What Nurseries Need to Know About the Invasive Species Regulation, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Lindsey Purcell, Urban Forestry Specialist
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

callery pears2

After their seeds are disseminated, callery pears can invade natural and disturbed areas.

callery pears1

Many callery pears can produce abundant fruit
that are widely distributed by birds

Invasive's leaves (figure 2)

Mile-a-minute vine grows more than 25 feet in height in one growing season while covering and smothering forest trees.

Invasive Plant 1

Garlic mustard produces chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Invasive species are any plant, animal, insect or plant disease not native to a specific location that can cause harm to the environment, impact the diversity of native species, reduce wildlife habitat or disrupt important ecosystem functions.

As spring approaches, many invasive plants are beginning to leaf out in local woodland areas. Now is the time to stop them in their tracks so they don’t overtake native plants, affect water availability or damage the quality of soil among other potential impacts.

Here are some resources to help you identify various invasive plants in woodland areas near you, to know when to report them and also what you can do help control their spread.

burning bush

burning bush

Asian Bush Honeysuckle
Watch this video to learn how to identify Asian Bush Honeysuckle .

Burning Bush
Learn about the Winged Burning Bush and what you can do to stop the spread of this species.
Learn more about the identification, distribution, impact, management and control of this deciduous shrub found in Indiana hardwood forests with this Purdue Extension publication, Invasive Plant Series: Winged Burning Bush.
Check out this article for alternatives plants listed in the Purdue University’s Landscape Report, Alternatives to Burning Bush for Fall Color.

Callery_pear_thicket

Callery Pear

Callery Pear
Watch this video to learn how to identify Invasive Plant Species: Callery Pear and discover some steps you can take to combat this invader.
To identify callery pear view this article in the Landscape Report titled Now is the Time to Identify Callery Pear.
Learn about what you can do if you have callery pear by viewing this article in Purdue Extension’s Indiana Yard and Garden, A “Perfect” Nightmare.

Japanese Chaff Flower
The chaff flower is typically found in flood plains, ditches, bottomland forests and on riverbanks, growing in rich, moist soil. It often shades out and displaces many native plant species. Learn more about the

mileaminute

Mile-a-minute

chaff flower and how to report it by viewing this Purdue Extension publication Japanese Chaff Flower.

Kudzu
Learn more about Kudzu in Indiana (pdf 248kb).

Mile-a-minute Vine
This plant forms very dense, tangled mats, growing over shrubs, small trees and up the sides of forest edges. Learn how to identify and control this fast-growing vine within the buckwheat family by viewing this Purdue Extension publication Mile-a-minute Vine.

multiflorRoseRob_Routledge_Sault_College_Bugwood.org

Multiflora Rose
Credit: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

Multiflora Rose
This plant bears white flowers in clusters, which turn into small red berries in the fall. Learn more about how to identify and control Multiflora Rose  (video).

Oriental Bittersweet
Familiarize yourself with Invasive Plant Species: Oriental Bittersweet, an exotic invasive vine that is moving from ornamental plantings to fields and woodlands.

Wintercreeper
This exotic invasive vine is moving from ornamental planting to fields and woodlands and features a white to pinkish-red fruit that is visible from September to November. Learn how to identify Invasive Plant Species: Wintercreeper, which is green all-year-round, and steps you can take to combat this invader.

To view more Got Nature? posts on Invasive Species:
Woodland Invaders
Invasive Species: the Good News and the Bad News

Winter Creeper

Winter Creeper
Credit: Chris Evans, NRES/University of Illinois

Resources
Indiana DNR Division of Forestry
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
What Nurseries Need to Know About the Invasive Species Regulation, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Elizabeth Jackson, Manager Walnut Cncl/IFWOA & Engage Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Wendy Mayer, FNR Communications Coordinator
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


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