Got Nature? Blog

Posted on March 25th, 2024 in Alert, Forestry, Plants, Safety, Wildlife | No Comments »

Cicada sitting on a blade of grassWRTV, Indianapolis News and Headlines: WEST LAFAYETTE — Elizabeth Long loves bugs.

And she wants you to know that this summer is going to be huge for bug lovers, thanks to the emergence of two special broods of cicadas, which hasn’t happened in more than two centuries.

“That’s really, really exciting for these periodical cicadas, these two broods that are going to be emerging this year,” said Long, a Purdue University assistant professor of entomology.

“The big deal is the fact that they will be emerging in synchrony for the first time (since 1803). It’s a really long time.”

Long has a doctorate from the University of Missouri in plant, insect and microbial sciences and specializes in managing pests and beneficial bugs on farms and orchards.

And just how much does Long love bugs?

Well, she described the big green-and-black cicadas we see every summer in Central Indiana as “cute.”

“They’re green, they have a white belly,” she said. “I think they’re very cute. They’re very clumsy, you know.”

Long said these two broods of cicadas will be emerging in southern and northern parts of Indiana for about a month starting in May, then they’re gone.

WRTV asked Long about this summer’s ridiculously rare emergence of the 17-year Brood XIII (or Brood 13) and the 13-year Brood XIX (Brood 19) cicadas.

Question: What’s so special about the cicadas we are going to see this summer?
Long: We don’t have many insects that stay underground as immatures for this long, you know. It’s I think pretty amazing. So that’s really, really exciting for these periodical cicadas, these two broods that are going to be emerging this year. The big deal is the fact that they will be emerging in synchrony for the first time (since 1803). It’s a really long time.

The main difference between the two broods is the time that they spend (before) they emerge. So one is a 13-year brood and, it’s a little confusing because… the two broods that are going to emerge are Brood 19 (Brood XIX) and Brood 13 (Brood XIII).

Brood 19, which is just the number assigned to this group that emerges, those are 13 year cicadas… Then Brood 13, which is a little bit confusing… they emerge every 17 years.

So you can see that 13-17 overlap. That’s how we’re in that coincidence with the synchrony based on the math of them emerging both at the same time this year.

It so weird that 19 is 13 (years) and 13 is (17 years). I had to read up on it to get it straight.

WRTV: No wonder you guys have to get advanced degrees to understand bugs.
Long: Everyone thinks they’re simple… I’m like, these insects, they keep it challenging.

To see the full article, please visit WRTV Indianapolis News and Headlines.

Resources:
Periodical Cicadas, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Entomology
Billions of Cicadas Are Coming This Spring; What Does That Mean for Wildlife?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR)
17 Ways to Make the Most of the 17-year Cicada Emergence, Purdue College of Agriculture
Ask an Expert: Cicada Emergence Video, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension-FNR
Periodical Cicada in Indiana, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Cicada Killers, The Education Store
Purdue Cicada Tracker, Purdue Extension-Master Gardener Program
Cicada, Youth and Entomology, Purdue Extension
Indiana Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology

Vic Ryckaert, Digital Reporter
WRTV Indianapolis

Elizabeth Y. Long, Assistant Professor
Purdue University Department of Entomology


Invasive species are any plant, animal, insect or plant disease not native to a specific location that can cause harm to the environment, impact the diversity of native species, reduce wildlife habitat or disrupt important ecosystem functions.

Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel, Invasive Species Playlist.Why should you care about invasive species? Invasive species limit land use, degrade natural resources and inhibit recreational pursuits such as hunting, fishing, bird watching, and foraging. They also negatively impact fisheries, agricultural and forestry industries, destabilize soil and alter water resources. Invasive species also out compete natives and are costly to control with estimates showing that the U.S. spends $137 billion/year to control/manage invasive species.

As spring approaches, many invasive plants will begin to leaf out in woodland areas. Spring is a good time to stop them in their tracks so they don’t overtake native plants, affect water availability or damage the quality of soil among other potential impacts.

Here are some resources to help you identify various invasive plants in woodland areas near you, to know when to report them and also what you can do help control their spread.

Videos on Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel, Invasive Species Playlist

burning bush

burning bush

Don’t miss this YouTube Shorts video, Lenny Farlee Talks About Invasive Plants Emerging in Early Spring

More Purdue Extension-FNR YouTube Video Series –
Woodland Management Moment:

multiflorRoseRob_Routledge_Sault_College_Bugwood.org

Multiflora Rose
Credit: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

Woodland Stewardship for Landowners:

ID That Tree:

FNR Extension Publications, The Education Store:

mileaminute

Mile-a-minute

Purdue Landscape Report:

FNR Extension Got Nature? Blog:

Purdue Report Invasive Species website.When and how do I report an invasive species?
The Purdue Invasive Species website will help you identify invasive species and explain how to send in your findings. If you notice something is killing an otherwise healthy stand of trees or shrubs, you will want to identify it and report it if it is on the invasive list. If you see a plant that is taking over an area where it doesn’t belong, you will want to identify it and report it if it is on the invasive list.

  • The GLEDN Phone App – Great Lakes Early Detection Network
  • EDDMaps – Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System
  • 1-866 No EXOTIC (1-866-663-9684)
  • depp@dnr.IN.gov – Email Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR)

More Resources
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
Emerald Ash Borer Information Network, Purdue University and Partners
What Nurseries Need to Know About the Invasive Species Regulation, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
Invasive plants: impact on environment and people, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center

Diana Evans, Extension and Web Communication Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to yet another native Indiana elm found in the far southwest corner of Indiana, and that is winged elm. It’s named for its prominent corky ridges that we see extending off the main stems and twigs. It has alternate leaf arrangement, simple leaves, and doubly serrated margins.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Winged Elm, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


Wild Bulletin, Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Fish and Wildlife: IN DNR providing public online forms to submit your comments regarding proposed changes on two regulations for the state.

Public Comment Period Open for Proposed Changes to Deer Hunting Rules:deer
Indiana’s Natural Resources Commission (NRC) has opened a public comment period for proposed changes to Indiana’s deer hunting rules before they vote on the proposed changes. Most proposed changes intend to simplify Indiana’s deer hunting rules so they are easier to understand.

Public comments can be submitted online. Locate the “Submit Comments Here” link in the Rules Docket for the Deer Hunting Rule Amendments Proposal. The deadline for public comments is March 20. The public hearing will be held on Wednesday, March 20, from 4–8 p.m. ET both online and in person at the Fort Harrison State Park Inn’s Roosevelt Ballroom. To attend the public hearing online, go to Microsoft Teams and enter Meeting ID: 296 491 887 327, Passcode: xTCuyW starting at 4 p.m. ET on March 20.

For more information on the proposed rule changes, visit the Indiana Department of Natural Resources’ rule and regulations changes web page. Questions about the proposed deer hunting rule changes should be directed to 812-334-3795 or indeerhotline@dnr.IN.gov.

Public Comment Period Open for Proposed Changes to River Otter Trapping Rules:River Otter sticking her tongue out.
The Natural Resources Commission (NRC) has opened a public comment period for proposed changes to Indiana’s river otter trapping rule before they vote on final adoption of the proposed changes.

Indiana DNR is proposing to open otter trapping statewide but keep all other otter regulations the same. The proposed changes will allow otters to be trapped statewide, allowing people to handle emerging wildlife conflicts in all counties and simplify the otter regulations. The DNR is confident the change will not negatively affect river otter populations, which staff will continue to monitor.

Public comments can be submitted online. Locate the “Comment on this rule” link in the Rule Docket for the River Otter Trapping Rule. The deadline for public comments is April 11.

Questions about the proposed otter trapping rule changes should be directed to Geriann Albers at 812-822-3304 or galbers@dnr.IN.gov. Visit the Indiana Department of Natural Resources website for more information on the proposed rule changes.

To learn more please visit Indiana Natural Resources Commission – Rulemaking Docket.

Subscribe to Wild Bulletin.

Resources:
Creating a Wildlife Habitat Management Plan for Landowners, The Education Store, Purdue Extension’s resource center
A Template for Your Wildlife Habitat Management Plan, The Education Store
Wildlife Habitat Hint: Trail Camera Tips and Tricks, Got Nature? Blog
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Designing Hardwood Tree Plantings for Wildlife – The Education Store
ID That Tree – YouTube Playlist
Hunting Guide for 2023-2024, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
How to Score Your White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
White-Tailed Deer Post Harvest Collection, video, The Education Store
Age Determination in White-tailed Deer, video, The Education Store
How to Build a Plastic Mesh Deer Exclusion Fence, The Education Store
Forest Management for Reptiles and Amphibians: A Technical Guide for the Midwest, The Education Store
Ask the Expert: Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Birds and Salamander Research, Purdue Extension – FNR
A Template for Your Wildlife Habitat Management Plan, The Education Store
Managing Your Woods for White-Tailed Deer, The Education Store

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to yet another southern Indiana oak species. This one is a member of the broad white oak group and it’s called post oak. It’s called that because it’s a very rot resistant and hard wood that used to be used for fence posts. It has rounded lobes, no bristle tips, and typified by a cruciform shape of leaf.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Post Oak, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


In this edition of ID That Tree, we’re going to introduce you to a southern oak found in Indiana, cherrybark oak. This species can typically be found in bottomland areas in extreme southern Indiana. It’s a member of the broad red oak group. It has hairlike bristle tips, relatively large leaves, a waxy coating on the top, and lobes that have one or tow hair-like spines on the end.

If you have any questions regarding wildlife, trees, forest management, wood products, natural resource planning or other natural resource topics, feel free to contact us by using our Ask an Expert web page.

Resources:
Cherrybark Oak, Native Trees of Indiana River Walk, Purdue Fort Wayne
ID That Tree, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel (Invasive White Mulberry, Siberian Elm, Tree of Heaven)
Invasive Species Playlist, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Asian Bush Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Callery Pear, Multiflora rose)
A Woodland Management Moment, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Against Invasives, Garlic Mustard, Autumn Olive)
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel (Common Buckthorn, Japanese Barberry)
How long do seeds of the invasive tree, Ailanthus altissima remain viable? (Invasive Tree of Heaven), USDA Forest Service
Indiana Department of Natural Resources: Invasive Species
Indiana Invasive Species Council
Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA)
Report Invasive, Purdue Extension
Aquatic Invasive Species, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG)
Episode 11 – Exploring the challenges of Invasive Species, Habitat University-Natural Resource University
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – FNR
Shrubs and Woody Vines of Indiana and the Midwest, The Education Store, Purdue Extension Resource Center
Native Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
Investing in Indiana Woodlands, The Education Store
Professional Forester, Indiana Forestry Woodland Owners Association
District Forester 10+acres of woodlands, Indiana Department of Natural Resources
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center
Purdue Department of Forestry & Natural Resources


Posted on February 19th, 2024 in Forestry, Plants, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

IN DNR-Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology Report: Jarred Spokowsky, Nursery Inspector & Compliance Officer, encourages professionals and enthusiast beekeepers to check out the new Honey Bee Nutrition-A Review and Guide to Supplemental Feeding which he shared in theHoney Bee Nutrition Guide Cover February 2024 Report. The guide lists useful information and an interesting summary of research as it relates to current supplements. “You will also find real-world feedback from multiple migratory operations from around the country and what their nutritional supplement routines are,” states Jarred Spokowsky.

This guide is presented by the Honey Bee Health Coalition which brings together beekeepers, growers, researchers, government agencies, agribusinesses, conservation groups, manufacturers, and consumer brands to improve the health of honey bees.

Jarred also shared the upcoming seminar that many will want to attend March 6, 2024, presented by the Project Apis m. The seminar title is From Forage to Feeding, Honey Bee Health Seminar.

You will be able to listen to the following professionals:

  • Dr. Priyadarshini Chakrabarti Basu
    Mississippi State University
  • Dr. Diana Cox-Foster
    USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit, Logan Utah
  • Dr. Vanessa Corby-Harris
    USDA-ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson. AZ

If you would like to subscribe to the informal report by the Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology view the Entomology Weekly Review web page.

Resources:
Social Bees and Wasps, The Education Store
Indiana Beekeepers Swarm List, Indiana DNR
New Invasive Predator of Honeybees, Purdue Landscape Report
Protecting Pollinators: Why Should We Care About Pollinators?, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Ask The Expert: What’s Buzzing or Not Buzzing About Pollinators , Purdue Extension – Forestry & Natural Resources (FNR) YouTube Channel
Purdue Pollinator Protection publication series, Purdue Extension Entomology
Invasive Species, Playlist, Purdue Extension – FNR YouTube Channel
Report Invasive Species, Purdue Invasive Species
What are invasive species and why should I care?, Got Nature? Blog, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources
Pest Management, The Education Store
Subscribe Purdue Extension-Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel

Jarred Spokowsky, Nursery Inspector & Compliance Officer
Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology

Diana Evans, Extension and Web Communications Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Indiana Department of Natural Resources


Are you an Indiana teacher who is looking to incorporate natural resources, forest ecology and forest management into your curriculum?

Apply now for the Indiana Natural Resources Teacher Institute, an immersive multi-day professional development workshop that will bring 18 teachers from across the state to Morgan-Monroe State Forest to see firsthand how forestry works in Indiana.  Sessions from June 24 to 28 will include tours of public and private forest lands, forest industry facilities, and information about forestry research in Indiana.Photo from HEENewsletter

The goal of the institute, which is co-hosted by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Extension, is to provide Indiana teachers with knowledge, skills and tools to effectively teach their students about forest ecology and forest management practices.  The forest environment becomes the basis for integrating the learning of many subject areas, including environmental science, biology, natural resources, and social science.  The NRTI incorporates STEM concepts and principles throughout the sessions and empowers educators to foster conceptual learning, critical thinking and decision-making skills in their classrooms.

The Natural Resources Teacher Institute emphasizes the importance of conservation of natural resources with special attention given to Indiana’s forests and forest products.  The project-based approach integrates hands-on study of the natural and cultural resources of the local community, addresses concepts in ecology, sense of place, civics, economics and forest land management and stewardship.

Participants will develop a curriculum project about forests or forestry for their classrooms.  Participants will earn 30+ Professional Growth Points and receive a stipend upon documentation of implementing curriculum project. Concepts are linked to the Indiana Learning Standards and participants are provided resources and training from Project Learning Tree as well as forestry equipment kits.

The 2024 edition of the NRTI will begin on Monday, June 24 at 1:00 pm and conclude on Friday, June 28 at noon. The base of operations will be the Forestry Training Center at Morgan-Monroe State Forest near Martinsville. Teachers will stay in the Training Center, sharing one of the 10 sleeping rooms.  Meals will be provided.

Interested educators must complete an application and submit it by the deadline of March 22, 2024.  Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, 2022. The institute is limited to 18 participants per session. There is no cost for participants. Those accepted will be required to pay a $50 deposit, which will be refunded at the end of the program. Participants will receive a stipend when documentation is provided that they have implemented their curriculum project with their students.

  • Attendees must be available to participate in all days of the institute. (Individual participation only – spouses and/or children, etc., are not permitted.)
  • Participants must be able to actively participate in all activities, which will include walking, hiking, summer temperatures, insects, etc. Reasonable accommodations will be made for individuals with disabilities who may need assistance.
  • Participants must have the ability to implement a curriculum project in their educational setting.

For more information and to request an application for the NRTI, contact Project Learning Tree Coordinator Lexi Eiler via email at leiler@dnr.in.gov or via phone at 463-253-8835.

To get a glimpse at the curriculum and also feedback from past participants, read NRTI Takes Forestry to the Classroom.

To register, please fill out the NRTI Application.

Resources:
Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources Facebook Page
Project Learning Tree
Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry
The Nature of Teaching, Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, The Education Store
Trees of the Midwest Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel

Indiana Forestry Educational Foundation, Indiana Forestry & Woodland Owners Association
Forest/Timber, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube Channel
Natural Resources Teacher Institute Takes Forestry to the Classroom, Purdue FNR News
Purdue Extension

Lexi Eiler, Coordinator
Indiana Project Learning Tree

Lenny Farlee, Sustaining Hardwood Extension Specialist
Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources


scent station photo

During K-12 Educator workshops, participants learn how to implement TNT curriculum such as building scent stations (pictured above). Photo by Jarred Brooke.

Agricultural & Natural Resources: Richard Louv’s words, “Time in nature is not leisure time, it’s an essential investment in our children’s health (and also, by the way, in our own),” underscores the critical role of nature in children’s well-being. Inspired by Louv’s concept of “nature deficit disorder,” The Nature of Teaching (TNT) was established in 2009 to connect youth to nature. The Nature of Teaching became an ANR signature program in 2019.

The primary focus of TNT is to engage K-12 youth with nature to foster environmental awareness and reap the positive health benefits of outdoor experiences. The program achieves this by integrating nature-based education into the school environment through standards-based curriculum. Through this, TNT not only connects students with nature but also provides lessons that align with Common Core and Next Generation Science standards.

The curriculum of The Nature of Teaching is divided into three key areas: Wildlife, Health and Wellness, and Food Waste. The Wildlife curriculum enhances students’ understanding of the natural world, while the Health and Wellness curriculum emphasizes the health benefits of connecting with nature. The Food Waste curriculum explores the environmental impact of food waste. Educators have access to more than 60 free standards-based lesson plans suitable for K-12 classrooms. In addition, TNT includes five informal curriculum units that are not standards-based and are more activity-focused. These informal lessons are great for field days and after-school type programs.

tnt union county hellbender adaptations

Veronica Bullock teaching a TNT lesson, Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, in a Union County classroom. Photo by Jennifer Logue.

Extension educators around the state have delivered TNT lessons to K-12 students since TNT became a signature program in 2019. In 2022 alone, 2,424 K-12 students benefited from TNT instruction, highlighting an impressive average knowledge increase of 16-31% in natural resources topics. The Nature of Teaching further supports K-12 educators through teacher workshops, with 17 teachers attending a workshop at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge in 2022. Attendees reported a significant boost in knowledge and confidence in connecting youth with nature.

As part of the signature program, Extension educators deliver three educational sessions using TNT formal curriculum to at least 15 students. Educators are also asked to provide students with pre- and post-tests to better understand student learning outcomes. Most educators deliver TNT in their local school system over several weeks. However, others deliver TNT through school clubs, after-school programs, or other avenues. The signature program requirements for Nature of Teaching are on the ANR Intranet. Educators are encouraged to work across program areas to deliver TNT.

Starting this year, The Nature of Teaching will be co-led by Jarred Brooke, Extension wildlife specialist, and Veronica Bullock, ANR educator, Franklin County. Jarred and Veronica have a long history with the TNT program and are excited to lead TNT into the future.

For educators who are interested in TNT, we will host a webinar on April 2 at 10 a.m. EDT to discuss future changes to the Nature of Teaching Signature program. You can register for the webinar here.

To see this article and others, please visit ANR Newsletter-February 2024.

Visit Nature of Teaching to learn more and explore the different lessons.

Resources:
Virtual Workshops, Nature of Teaching
Nature of Teaching, Website, Purdue College of Agriculture
The Nature of Teaching, YouTube channel
Transporting Food Waste, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Benefits of Connecting with Nature, The Education Store
Nature of Teaching: Common Mammals of Indiana, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste Solutions, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Food Waste and the Environment, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Trees of the Midwest, The Education Store
The Nature of Teaching: Adaptations for Aquatic Amphibians, The Education Store
Trees of the Midwest Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel
Adaptations For Aquatic Amphibians Webinar, Nature of Teaching YouTube channel

Agriculture & Natural Resources (ANR)

Jarred Brooke, Wildlife Extension Specialist
Purdue Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Veronica Bullock, ANR Extension Educator
Purdue Extension Franklin County


Posted on February 6th, 2024 in Forestry, Land Use, Plants, Publication, Wildlife, Woodlands | No Comments »

Purdue Extension: This Purdue Extension 2023 Impact Report features stories that highlight partnerships that have served our state’s producers, supported residents in becoming healthier, built more resilient communities and prepared Indiana’s youth to take that first step to their giant leap. We will continue to bring the science, technology and resources to all 92 counties as Indiana’s educational partner for life and as an extension of the world class institution we represent: Purdue University.2023 Impact Report Cover

Check out the Purdue Extension-Forestry & Natural Resource highlights on the following programs:

  • Todays Teens Lead the Way in Sharing Love of STEM
  • Guiding Farm Families Down the Road of Succession Planning
  • Providing Support for Families Through Seasons of Change
  • Addressing Substance Use Recovery Together
  • Workforce Development Efforts Target a Broad Range of Users
  • Training International Farmers in Food Preservation and Processing
  • Farmer-Driven Research Creates Solutions

Resources:
Nature of Teaching, Purdue College of Agriculture
Community Development, Purdue Extension
Purdue Extension
Family Programs, Purdue Extension – Health and Human Sciences
Taking Action to Address Substance Use in Communities (TASC), Purdue Extension
Diversified Farming and Food Systems, Purdue Extension
Woodland Stewardship for Landowners, Playlist, Purdue Extension – Forestry and Natural Resources YouTube channel
A Woodland Management Moment, FNR – Ext Playlist
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment – Wildlife Responses to Timber Harvesting, The Education Store, Purdue Extension resource center
Forest Improvement Handbook, The Education Store
Community Planning, FNR -Ext Playlist

Purdue Extension


Got Nature?

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