Welcome to the Division of Financial Aid

We're here to help students and families find ways to eliminate financial barriers to a Purdue education. To do this, we've cut the jargon — no more lawyer-speak. (Well, as little as possible. If you don't understand something, just ask.) Here we'll walk you through learning about types of financial aid available, how to apply for aid,how to keep your aid and — through our myMoney blog — ways to manage your finances throughout the college experience.

We are now offering virtual counseling!

We are excited to announce new virtual counseling opportunities through Zoom. Counselors will be available on the dates and times listed below, and will happily “visit” with you. Just click the link during the appointment time, and pop into our virtual lobby.  The host will move you into a virtual counseling room where you can speak privately with a financial aid counselor.  No appointments are necessary – just stop in when it’s convenient for you.  We look forward to serving you in this new environment.

Monday-Friday from 11 am to 3 pm

Note: All times listed are Eastern DST. 

Division of Financial Aid Office Hours

Our office (Schleman Hall, Room 305) is now open to walk-in visitors Monday-Friday from 10 am to 2 pm. No appointments are necessary.

You may also still contact us via email at facontact@purdue.edu, or call us at 765-494-5050, Monday-Friday from 8 am to 5 pm.

CARES Act

You may have read that the U.S. Congress, in its coronavirus relief legislation, provided funds to help students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Purdue recognizes, as Congress did, that you may have incurred unexpected expenses as a result of COVID-19’s disruption of our campus operations in Spring 2020 (new Fall 2020 beginners and those who were not enrolled in the spring semester are not eligible). The application provides an opportunity for you to recover related expenses for such items as food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care. Please see the application for additional details. We will make every effort to assist you in getting reimbursed for those expenses if they are allowable under guidance from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid and if sufficient funds are available. 

To make this “CARES Act” funding available to Purdue students, we have established a CARES Act Emergency Funding application, which can be accessed at purdue.scholarshipuniverse.com. Once you log in to ScholarshipUniverse with your Purdue Career Account credentials, you can search for the CARES Act Emergency Funding application in the search bar at the top of the site.

To be eligible, you must have a FAFSA on file with the Division of Financial Aid or be eligible to file a FAFSA. Only students who are or could be eligible to participate in the federal student aid programs may receive emergency financial aid grants. If you have not filed a FAFSA, more detailed eligibility information is outlined at the beginning of the application.

Please note: The CARES Act Emergency Funding application is open for expenses incurred between May 2020 and August 2020 due to COVID-19.

CARES Act Reporting

The following information is provided to comply with the Department of Education's CARES Act reporting requirements.

Report date: July 17, 2020

1. An acknowledgement that the institution signed and returned to the Department the Certification and Agreement and the assurance that the institution has used, or intends to use, no less than 50 percent of the funds received under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act to provide Emergency Financial Aid Grants to students. Purdue University signed and returned the Certification and Agreement to the Department of Education on April 20, 2020.

2. The total amount of funds that the institution will receive or has received from the Department pursuant to the institution’s Certification and Agreement [for] Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students. $11,294,398.00

3. The total amount of Emergency Financial Aid Grants distributed to students under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act as of the date of submission (i.e., as of the 30-day Report and every 45 days thereafter). $1,152,947 (we are currently reveiwing emergency grant applications for summer 2020)

4. The estimated total number of students at the institution eligible to participate in programs under Section 484 in Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and thus eligible to receive Emergency Financial Aid Grants to students under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act. 31,683

5. The total number of students who have received an Emergency Financial Aid Grant to students under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act. 1,477

6. The method(s) used by the institution to determine which students receive Emergency Financial Aid Grants and how much they would receive under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act. Students are submitting applications requesting funding for housing, food, course materials, technology costs, health care, child care, and other expenses. Students are asked to provide an explanation for the requested funding, which is used to determine eligibility.

7. Any instructions, directions, or guidance provided by the institution to students concerning the Emergency Financial Aid Grants. An email was sent to eligible students on May 12, 2020 with instructions to apply:

"To be eligible, you must have a FAFSA on file with the Division of Financial Aid or be eligible to file a FAFSA. Only students who are or could be eligible to participate in the federal student aid programs may receive emergency financial aid grants. If you have not filed a FAFSA, more detailed eligibility information is outlined at the beginning of the application. To read more about eligibility and to complete the funding application, please visit purdue.scholarshipuniverse.com. Once you log in to ScholarshipUniverse with your Purdue Career Account credentials, you can search for the CARES Act Emergency Funding application in the search bar at the top of the site."

 

Financial Aid and COVID-19: FAQs

Fall 2020 Online Instruction Option

As you most likely have seen, Purdue University has created an online option for Fall 2020 amidst the coronavirus pandemic. If you are considering this option and also wondering how many credit hours you may want to take, reviewing the questions below can help you determine how your financial aid could be affected. Please do not hesitate to contact our office at 765-494-5050 or facontact@purdue.edu if you have questions about this option.

How will attending only online classes affect my cost of attendance? Your Cost of Attendance will be reduced by the same amount as the reduction made to your tuition.  Additionally, if you had indicated on your 2020-21 FAFSA that you would be living on campus, we will reduce your housing and food allowance. You will not be billed for housing and food. The amount is allotted to offset your out-of-pocket expenses.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for the Presidential, Trustee, or Emerging Leader Scholarship? As long as you are enrolled in at least 9 credit hours, you are able to receive your Purdue merit scholarship.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for the Pell Grant? Your Pell Grant must be pro-rated based on hours of attendance. You will receive roughly ¾ the amount of your original Pell Grant for attending 9-11 credit hours per term, ½ the amount for attending 6-8 credit hours per term, and ¼ the amount for attending between 1-5 credit hours per term.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for the Twenty-first Century Scholarship or the Frank O’Bannon Higher Education Grant? When using Indiana state aid, you must keep in mind the minimum enrollment hours and credit completion requirements for your particular program. More information can be found regarding credit completion at https://www.in.gov/che/4887.htm. More information regarding minimum credit hours of enrollment per term can be found at https://www.in.gov/che/4498.htm.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for my private scholarship? Every scholarship donor has different requirements, so it is best to reach out to your specific donor to learn more.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for Federal Loans? You are able to borrow if attending at least part-time (6 or more hours for undergrads and professional students, 4 or more hours per term for grads).  If your cost of attendance is reduced, your loan eligibility may also be reduced to stay within your Estimated Cost of Attendance.

How will attending less than 12 credit hours affect my eligibility for my private Loans? Most private lenders will allow you to borrow if attending at least part-time (6 or more hours for undergrads and professional students, 4 or more hours per term for grads).  If your cost of attendance is reduced, your loan eligibility may also be reduced to stay within the Estimated Cost of Attendance.

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Can I qualify for additional aid if I am experiencing income loss due to COVID-19? If you experience income loss such as a job change or job loss due to COVID-19, contact the Division of Financial Aid to see if a special circumstance appeal is a possibility. A financial aid counselor will use information and numbers you provide to see if processing an appeal may change the student’s aid. Please note that you must be out of work or experiencing the income loss for at least 8 weeks for us to be able to consider it a special circumstance.

Have deadlines changed for Indiana State Aid? The Indiana Commission for Higher Education (CHE) has announced that Hoosiers who missed the state filing deadline of April 15th may still file the FAFSA for consideration for state aid. CHE’s goal is to be accommodating in case anyone missed the original date due to circumstances regarding COVID-19, and aid will be available on a limited first-come first-serve basis. For more information, visit https://www.in.gov/che/.

Are there COVID-19 related benefits for federal student loan borrowers? Current borrowers or borrowers in repayment should refer to the Department of Education's COVID-19 FAQs and statement: https://studentaid.gov/announcements-events/coronavirus.

Are there changes to withdraw/drop deadlines? Yes. Students now have until the end of the semester (May 1) to withdraw from (drop) a course with academic advisor approval.

Are there changes to the way courses are graded? Learning remotely with everything else going on may present its challenges. Students now have until the end of the semester (May 1) to switch any course from a letter grade to Pass/No Pass. In addition, no student will be dropped from the University or placed on academic probation as a result of their performance in Spring 2020.

How will my merit scholarship be affected if I choose the pass/no pass option for spring grading? If you choose the pass/no pass grading option for spring, your most recent cumulative GPA will be looked at when we renew merit scholarships. This could mean we will be looking at the cumulative GPA from the fall.

If my merit scholarship is not renewed, can I appeal that decision? Yes. For extenuating circumstances or circumstances due to COVID-19 events, students may submit a merit scholarship appeal for review.

Will I receive a refund if I decide to withdraw from classes after spring break? Although the deadline is extended, any drop/withdrawals made will not be eligible for tuition/financial aid refund.

Will I receive a refund if I move out of University Residences before the end of the semester? A credit of $750 will be provided to any students who check out by or are not remaining in University Residences after March 30. It will be applied to either the current balance or a balance for a future semester. All unused Dining Dollars will also be rolled over to the Fall. Graduating students have the option to request that the $750 and remaining Dining Dollars be refunded instead.

Will my financial aid change now that there is only online instruction? Your financial aid will not change due to the transition toward online instruction. As long as you remain enrolled and maintain your enrollment status, your aid will not be affected. For example, if you are a full-time student currently taking 15 credit hours, finishing those 15 credit hours via online instruction still means you are a full-time student and will not change financial aid.

What should I keep in mind if I am considering dropping a course or withdrawing after spring break? Aside from the refund policy mentioned above, dropping a course at this time in the semester or withdrawing altogether can impact your future financial aid eligibility. Altering your academic plan may cause you to exceed your maximum timeframe for financial aid or affect your credit completion pace, both components of the Division of Financial Aid’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy. In addition, if you have a scholarship or grant that requires continuous enrollment or specific enrollment criteria, you may be at risk of losing that aid when you withdraw. To read more about our financial aid policies (including SAP), visit https://www.purdue.edu/dfa/contact/policies-appeals.html. To read about scholarship and grant renewability criteria, visit https://www.purdue.edu/dfa/details.html.

Will my Pell Grant be affected? Federal funding such as Pell and SEOG will not be affected with the change in method of instruction.

Since summer study abroad is canceled, will I be reimbursed for my expenses? Students will be reimbursed by the university for any expenses that are not reimbursable from other sources.

Can I receive a refund for my study abroad plane ticket that I purchased out of pocket? Students who independently paid for an airline ticket out of pocket should seek a refund or credit with the airline. If a refund, credit, or transfer cannot be received, students should inform their study abroad leaders.

Can I still return to campus and work my Federal Work Study position? Campus is currently still open and while instruction will happen online, student employees may still work at their current jobs.

If I choose to not return and work my Work Study position, will my financial aid be affected? Other than no longer receiving a paycheck for your Work Study job, your aid will not be affected as long as you remain enrolled in classes. Deciding not to work will not impact what you have already earned for the year, and it is your choice whether you want to continue working. If your wish was to continue working, but you are unable to work your position, please contact the Division of Financial Aid via phone or email (765-494-5050, facontact@purdue.edu).

Resources for Veterans

Below are some links to information and services Purdue University provides for our Military Veteran students.

https://www.purdue.edu/veterans/admissions/financialAid.html

https://www.purdue.edu/veterans/admissions/benefits.html

Purdue University Division of Financial Aid, Schleman Hall, Room 305, 475 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2050, (765) 494-5050

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Trouble with this page? Disability-related accessibility issue? Please contact Division of Financial Aid at facontact@purdue.edu.

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