Recent News

A technology devised to help reduce injection pain, swelling from some best-selling drugs

January 15, 2020

Eight of the top 10 selling drugs in the United States are biologics, which are produced from living organisms or certain components of living organisms. Subcutaneous injection – where the drug is injected into the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle – is emerging as an effective delivery route alternative to intravenous infusion and allows a user to take the drug at home. The practice has not been broadly adopted, in part due to pain and discomfort that occurs during an injection. Now, Purdue University researchers have developed technology to help drug manufacturers create new formulations and injection devices of medications to reduce the pain and discomfort.

A technology devised to help reduce injection pain, swelling from some best-selling drugs

Synthetic neurons project offers platform for disease treatment, further brain research

January 10, 2020

The body can recover from many things, but the damage caused by Parkinson’s disease isn’t one of them. No cure exists for Parkinson’s, which 1 million people in the U.S. are expected to be living with by 2020. But an outright cure isn’t the primary objective of research by Chongli Yuan, a Purdue University chemical engineering professor and leader of Purdue’s section of a multidisciplinary team studying the possibility of building synthetic neuron cells

Synthetic neurons project offers platform for disease treatment, further brain research

Millions with Swallowing Problems Could Be Helped Through New Wearable Device

December 17, 2019

Georgia A. Malandraki, an associate professor of speech, language, and hearing sciences in Purdue University’s College of Health and Human Sciences, and Chi Hwan Lee, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering in Purdue’s College of Engineering, founded Curasis LLC and serve as an acting chief executive officer and chief technology officer, respectively. They started the company to commercialize their wearable technology and move it as quickly as possible to clinics and people with swallowing difficulties.

Millions with Swallowing Problems Could Be Helped Through New Wearable Device

BME's Kinzer-Ursem, Linnes named Rising Star professors

November 15, 2019

Tamara Kinzer-Ursem and Jacqueline Linnes were named Marta E. Gross Assistant Professors of Biomedical Engineering through the Purdue College of Engineering's Rising Star program. The Rising Star Program recognizes assistant and associate professors for their exceptional accomplishments and leadership in research, teaching, and engagement.

BME's Kinzer-Ursem, Linnes named Rising Star professors

Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use- Dr. Richard van Rijn

November 13, 2019

A Purdue University team published a paper in the Nov. 8 edition of the British Journal of Pharmacology examining the effects of kratom and the potential impacts on people with alcohol use disorder. The cost to individuals and society from alcohol use is estimated at more than $250 billion each year. The Purdue scientists, in collaboration with researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering and Washington University, studied the potential effects of kratom and its components on the body and in the ability to reduce alcohol consumption. The Purdue team previously focused on a G protein-coupled receptor called the delta-opioid receptor, which is a novel drug target that is different from the receptor in the body that binds prescription opioids. They developed drugs that bind to this new target and selectively activate a particular protein signaling cascade of this receptor.

Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use- Dr. Richard van Rijn

PIIN Events at the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting

November 11, 2019

The Society for Neuroscience held its annual meeting in Chicago in mid-October with an attendance of over 30,000. PIIN hosted a social event to promote Purdue, a student recruitment booth that attracted over 50 visits, and “A Night at the Museum” at the Chicago Field Museum adjacent to the conference venue.

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Summary- PIIN Life Sciences-Engineering Workshops Series I

November 11, 2019

On November 4th, the Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience (PIIN) kicked off its Life Sciences-Engineering Trainee Workshop Series. The two-part program aims to bring together interdisciplinary research teams of graduate students and postdocs focused on tackling significant problems in neuroscience. Selected teams will receive funding from PIIN to conduct their proposed research as part of the institute’s key initiatives. The first event drew more than 20 graduate students and postdocs. The program began with introductory remarks by Dr.Chris Rochet, the John and Donna Krenicki Director of the Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience. The program was followed by presentations from Justin Patel, who presented a collaboration project between Drs. Rochet, Kinzer-Ursem, and Webb Labs entitled "Fluorescence lifetime microscopy for the imaging of alpha-Synuclein aggregation in the brain". Min Ku Kim also presented a collaboration project between Drs. Malandraki and Lee’s Lab entitled “Sticker like sensor patch for remote management of oropharyngeal swallowing disorders”.

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Distinguished and Named Professorship Ceremony honors faculty, administrators

November 4, 2019

A reception and ceremony held Friday (Nov. 1) celebrated midcareer, distinguished and named professors and administrators at Purdue for their many accomplishments and successes. The event took place in Stewart Center’s Fowler Hall.

Distinguished and Named Professorship Ceremony honors faculty, administrators

National Institute on Aging awards $225,000 for work to improve Alzheimer’s diagnoses

October 24, 2019

The promise of earlier detection of diseases such as Alzheimer’s is welcome news to the millions of families in the United States already affected by the various types of dementia. Emerging techniques such as spinal taps have shown success, but they are not effective for everyone. Now, Tymora Analytical Operations, a Purdue University-affiliated company, has received a $225,000 SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health for its approach to using blood and plasma for earlier detection of Alzheimer’s disease.

National Institute on Aging awards $225,000 for work to improve Alzheimer’s diagnoses

Institute hosts Night at the Museum in Chicago

October 21, 2019

On Oct. 20, the Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience hosted a Night at the Museum reception at the Field Museum in Chicago. The event, which coincided with the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, highlighted the ingenuity and passion of leading neuroscience researchers at Purdue. One of the main goals in hosting this event was to expand the institute's network of supporters and partners. With rising numbers of people being diagnosed with neurological disorders such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease and suffering from traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, there is great urgency for new and better treatments. 

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