Past News

Manipulated Video & Audio Made using ‘Deepfakes’ Poses Threat to Elections

May 7, 2019

A video on social media shows a high-ranking U.S. legislator declaring his support for an overwhelming tax increase. You react accordingly because the video looks like him and sounds like him, so certainly it has be him. “It’s possible that people are going to use fake videos to make fake news and insert these into a political election,” said Delp, the Charles William Harrison Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “There’s been some evidence of that in other elections throughout the world already.

Manipulated Video & Audio Made using ‘Deepfakes’ Poses Threat to Elections

Bringing ‘space trash’ safely back to Earth

April 30, 2019

Orbital debris from spacecraft, the defunct satellites and fragments of spent rockets left suspended in Earth’s atmosphere, are slowly making their way back to Earth. Objects usually return after a few years, but debris trapped in higher orbits can remain for more than a century. Purdue University’s David Spencer, associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics, aims to develop a system that in the future would deorbit spacecraft launched by companies like SpaceX, OneWeb, and Boeing, as the spacecraft complete their missions. A space junk animation is available here.

Bringing ‘space trash’ safely back to Earth

Plaksha University: A new school of thought

April 29, 2019

Interestingly, when it comes to naming, many new institutes and universities are borrowing from the past. Nalanda was an ancient seat of learning, and is a modern university now. Takshashila and Ashoka, too, invoke a celebrated past. Now, Plaksha (Sanskrit for the ficus tree; many a gurukulas are imagined to have flourished under its shade) joins the league. While the campus will be ready only by 2021, Plaksha has announced its first course, the Technology Leaders Fellowship Program (TLFP), curated by Arvind Raman, senior associate dean of Faculty, Purdue University, and an academic advisor to Plaksha. A residential programme, TLFP will start in August 2019 at the upcoming Plaksha Innovation Center in Gurgaon.

Plaksha University: A new school of thought

Plaksha University: A new school of thought

April 29, 2019

...Plaksha, Raman adds, has three goals: “One is reimagining engineering education for the 21st century, and how to integrate social sciences with engineering. Two, how can engineering solve grand challenges India is facing—such as cleaning River Ganga or making agriculture sustainable in Punjab—and to solve these problems, we need interdisciplinary approaches. For example, we are talking about AI and ML, but we need to think how these new-age technologies will solve societal challenges. Three, making an impact beyond the walls of the university; innovation cannot be standalone.”

Plaksha University: A new school of thought

New hybrid energy method could fuel the future of rockets, spacecraft for exploration

April 10, 2019

A new propellant formulation method to use graphene foams – material used in electronics, optics and energy devices – to power spacecraft is being developed in Purdue University's Maurice J. Zucrow Laboratories, which is the largest academic propulsion lab in the world. The research is showing success at increasing burn rate of solid propellants that are used to fuel rockets and spacecraft.

New hybrid energy method could fuel the future of rockets, spacecraft for exploration

Design treatment of advanced metals producing better sculpting for defence, vehicles and health products

April 1, 2019

The conventional method of using advanced metals in manufacturing is costly, since they tend to be difficult to sculpture. A Purdue University team created a method for applying a designer surface-active agent to the surface of a metal to make it easier to cut and shape the material into parts and pieces. It’s a growing industry – the global metal fabrication market value is expected to reach $24 billion by 2024.

Design treatment of advanced metals producing better sculpting for defence, vehicles and health products

New method to purify water used in oil refinement

March 23, 2019

Scientists, including one of Indian origin, have developed a process to remove nearly all traces of oil in produced water — a byproduct from the oil refinery and extraction process. Researchers at the Purdue University in the US have developed a process to remove nearly all traces of oil in produced water. The process uses activated charcoal foam and subjects it to solar light to produce heat and purify the water. The foam absorbs the oil contaminants from the water. “This is a simple, clean and inexpensive treatment process,” said Ashreet Mishra, a graduate research assistant at the Purdue University.

New method to purify water used in oil refinement

Set goals at an early age

March 20, 2019

Jerry Ross, 71, was in Class 4 when he decided that he wanted to join his country’s space programme. Just nine years later, in 1980, he was selected as an astronaut. A retired US Air Force officer, Ross intensively worked in the area of space walks or EVAs (extra-vehicular activity), and as a result, the former NASA astronaut became the first person ever to fly seven times to space. During his career with NASA, he logged more than 1,393 hours in space. To document several such experiences for his granddaughters and to encourage the young to figure out what they would like to do in their life early on, he wrote his first book in 2013, Spacewalker: My Journey in Space and Faith as NASA's record-setting frequent flyer.

Set goals at an early age

Veteran US astronaut cautions against space travel, says it’s a risky proposition

March 13, 2019

Most people are fired up about space flights — going up and coming down — but there are some harsh ground realities, cautions veteran US astronaut Jerry Ross. For most corporate Earthlings, ‘hang in there’ could have a world of different meanings. For Jerry Ross, astronaut and a member of seven US space shuttle missions, it meant adjusting to the darkness of the universe while floating in space.

Veteran US astronaut cautions against space travel, says it’s a risky proposition

Your body is your internet -- and now it can't be hacked

March 12, 2019

Someone could hack into your pacemaker or insulin pump and potentially kill you, just by intercepting and analyzing wireless signals. This hasn't happened in real life yet, but researchers have been demonstrating for at least a decade that it's possible. Before the first crime happens, Purdue University engineers have tightened security on the "internet of body." Now, the network you didn't know you had is only accessible by you and your devices, thanks to technology that keeps communication signals within the body itself.

Your body is your internet -- and now it can't be hacked

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