Frequently Asked Questions about Sports Wagering

These FAQs supplement the policy on Sports Wagering (III.A.5).

  1. Why is Purdue University banning sports wagering when it is otherwise legal in the state of Indiana?
  2. Are visiting scholars, adjunct faculty and emeritus faculty subject to this policy?
  3. Are clinical interns and clinical residents subject to this policy?
  4. Who is considered a student under this policy? Are students who take AP or dual-enrollment classes subject to this policy?
  5. Are prospective students subject to this policy?
  6. Are students who take only online classes subject to this policy?
  7. Are Purdue alumni subject to this policy?
  8. I periodically do freelance photography for Purdue for pay. Am I subject to this policy?
  9. Can I participate in a March Madness bracket pool?
  10. Can I participate in a college sports fantasy league?
  11. Can I wager on college e-sports?
  12. I have a running bet with my neighbor for the Oaken Bucket game, where the loser buys the other person dinner. Is that OK because there is no money at stake? 
  13. I graduated from a university other than Purdue, and I like to place bets on my alma mater. Can I still do that?

Q1. Why is Purdue University banning sports wagering when it is otherwise legal in the state of Indiana?

A1. Prohibition of wagers on Purdue sports by our faculty, staff, students and independent contractors is a statement about the culture and expectations we hold for ourselves. It creates a safe space for our student-athletes to be open with faculty, coaches, trainers, staff, and fellow students and promotes fair play and the integrity of competition.

Q2. Are visiting scholars, adjunct faculty and emeritus faculty subject to this policy?

A2. Yes. Visiting scholars, adjunct faculty and emeritus faculty who are engaged in scholarly or research activities on a Purdue University campus are subject to the prohibitions of the policy.

Q3. Are clinical interns and clinical residents subject to this policy?

A3. Yes. Clinical interns and clinical residents are considered staff under the policy.

 

Q4. Who is considered a student under this policy? Are students who take AP or dual-enrollment classes subject to this policy?

A4. A student is anyone who is presently enrolled and attending the University and for whom the University maintains records. A student is deemed to be enrolled and attending once fees have been paid for the session (semester) or as of the first day of the session (semester), whichever occurs first. Anyone who meets those criteria is subject to the policy.

Q5. Are prospective students subject to this policy?

A5. No. An individual is only considered a student when they meet the criteria noted above. Note: NCAA regulations have a broader definition for prospective student-athletes, which would subject those individuals to NCAA prohibitions.

Q6. Are students who take only online classes subject to this policy?

A6. Yes. Students who take online classes are still enrolled and attending the University, and are subject to the policy. The only exception is for students of Purdue University Global, which has its own code of conduct and policies.

Q7. Are Purdue alumni subject to this policy?

A7. No. Purdue alumni are not considered faculty, staff or students. If alumni are hired through independent contractor agreements, then they would be subject to the prohibitions of the policy in that capacity.

Q8. I periodically do freelance photography for Purdue for pay. Am I subject to this policy?

A8. Yes. As a freelance photographer working under an engagement with Purdue, you are an independent contractor subject to the policy. During the term of your agreement with Purdue, or from the date you are given the assignment through the date on which you complete the terms of your engagement, you are subject to the prohibitions of the policy.

Q9. Can I participate in a March Madness bracket pool?

A9. If you are not required to pay anything to participate in the bracket pool, you can participate and may accept any prize awarded to you for winning. However, if you pay something to participate, that is illegal in Indiana and is, therefore, prohibited.

Q10. Can I participate in a college sports fantasy league?

A10. Yes. Fantasy sports leagues are not prohibited under the policy. Note: NCAA regulations do prohibit student-athletes and select other individuals from playing in fantasy leagues with entry fees.

Q11. Can I wager on college e-sports?

A11. No. E-sports are subject to the same prohibitions as other sports under the policy.

Q12. I have a running bet with my neighbor for the Oaken Bucket game, where the loser buys the other person dinner. Is that OK because there is no money at stake? 

A12. No. This is a form of gambling that is still illegal in Indiana. The sports gaming activity legalized by the Indiana legislature in 2019 includes only sports wagering conducted by or through licensees, operators or permit holders (e.g., casinos) with a certificate of authority to do so from the Indiana Gaming Commission. Since even a friendly dinner wager between two people involves “risking money or other property for gain, contingent in whole or in part upon lot [or] chance,” it technically meets the definition of gambling in Indiana and is therefore not permitted by law.

Q13. I graduated from a university other than Purdue, and I like to place bets on my alma mater. Can I still do that?

A13. Yes, as long as your alma mater is not playing against Purdue. The policy only prohibits wagers that involve Purdue University teams, student-athletes, coaches, statistical occurrences, contests and events.

 

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