Research Opportunities

Agriculture

Dr. Jon Schoonmaker, Associate Professor of Animal Sciences

My research focuses on beef cattle nutrition and management. Studies involve feeding various feedstuffs and analyzing growth and metabolism of cows, calves, and growing animals. Work would entail handling beef cattle collecting samples and then performing laboratory analyses on collected samples.

Email: jschoonm@purdue.edu


Dr. Theresa Casey, Research Assistant Professor of Animal Sciences

Students would assist in all on-going studies in the lab. Duties of students will be commensurate with experience and training, although no training is necessary for this position and we will train students in all aspects of the position. Duties will include everyday lab tasks washing dishes, autoclaving trash, and labeling. As student develops skills they will prepare solutions and cell culture media. Students will also have opportunities to conduct cell culture and molecular biology experiments. There may also be opportunities to assist with studies being conducted with swine and cattle aimed at understanding lactation physiology.

Email: theresa-casey@purdue.edu


Dr. Brad Kim, Assistant Professor of Animal Sciences

Providing consistently high quality and wholesome meat products to consumers is crucial to the continued success of the US meat industry. The purpose of this research is to determine the role of small heat shock protein (HSP) in postmortem protein degradation of muscles. Anti-apoptotic functions of HSP have been well identified, but its potential impact on endogenous proteolytic enzyme activity is largely unknown. This study will determine the involvement of HSP in postmortem protein degradation of beef muscles. Student will have hands-on experience by performing assays to observe and quantifying the presence of small heat shock proteins present in samples, and interpreting results. Student will assist graduate students in any way needed, especially as is relevant to studies in small heat shock proteins.

Email: bradkim@purdue.edu


Dr. Chunhua Zhang, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

We use chemical genetic and cell biology approaches to understand the mechanism of membrane trafficking in plants.

Email: zhang150@purdue.edu


Dr. Bhagyashree Katare, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics

The project involves collecting food consumption data from participants in an experiment in a dining hall/cafeteria setting. Students will help in conducting the experiment, data collection, data extraction, data cleaning and data analysis. Tasks will involve participant recruitment, communicating with the participants about the tasks involved in the experiment, weighing of the food, taking photographs, extracting data from the photographs and data analysis.

Email: bkatare@purdue.edu


Dr. Elizabeth Flaherty, Assistant Professor of Forestry and Natural Resources

Using photographs to identify individual animals is becoming more common in wildlife biology especially when studying rare species. Photogrammetry, the science of obtaining measurements from photos, has the potential for non-invasively monitoring a wide variety of sensitive populations of free-ranging animals but thus far has only been applied to a few species. As part of the summer stay internship, the student(s) would work closely with 2 graduate students in the Flaherty lab in Forestry and Natural Resources to develop and refine methods to identify individuals in two endangered species populations, green sea turtles and American burying beetles. The student(s) will collect data for body morphology from photographs and use computer software to quantitatively analyze these measurements. The student(s) will work to develop a measurement identification for unique individuals that could be used to identify individual animals in the field. All of the work will be lab-based, involve a computer, and occur on the West Lafayette main campus. Work hours are flexible.

Email: eflaher@purdue.edu


Amanda Barabas, Graduate Research Assistant Animal Sciences

Our lab focuses on evaluating animal welfare using natural behavior and physical health as assessment tools. We need a qualified, detail oriented undergraduate student to assist graduate researchers with video and textual data analysis. The student may have one of several responsibilities depending on project progression. The student may be responsible for observing and recording behavioral data for a project(s) that may involve mouse, rat, and/or pig subjects. The student may be responsible for coding open-ended text responses from laboratory personnel about laboratory animal enrichment. This is an excellent opportunity for a student interested in animal behavior/welfare as they will learn an overview of the research process, be well trained in identifying behaviors based on specific ethograms or coding text based on thematic analysis, and may have the opportunity to learn additional lab methodology depending on the progression of various projects. This student will likely be involved in a study looking at chemical signaling profiles and evaluating their influence on social behavior.

Email: abarabas@purdue.edu


Dr. Gordon McNickle, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

I am a plant ecologist. In my lab, we ask questions about species diversity, and plant community structure. For example, imagine an Indiana forest with 20 species of trees. We want to know: why 20 species instead of, say, 100 or 3? Why those particular 20 species instead of some different assemblage of 20 species? To answer these questions we often measure how trees grow depending on the environment, and the species that surround them. This internship would allow students to contribute to these efforts by learning about dendrochronology: the science of tree rings. Dendrochronology lets us measure tree growth backwards in time! The internship would be a mixture of collecting data/samples outside in the forest, and then processing samples back in the lab on campus. More details about our lab can be found here: http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~gmcnickl/index.html

Email: gmcnickl@purdue.edu


Dr. Xing Liu, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

Ubiquitination plays an important role in eukaryotic cells, and is achieved by three sequentially-operating enzymes, of which the last enzyme in the cascade, ubiquitin ligase (E3), confers substrate recognition and ubiquitination. My lab aims to dissect the function and regulation of the ubiquitination pathways in cells and organisms, using multiple approaches including biochemistry, biophysics, proteomics, mathematics and chemical genetics. Student will have opportunities to conduct molecular biology and biochemistry experiments, assisting in the on-going studies in the lab. An additional stipend of $800 will be provided to the student and the student is expected to work additional hours beyond the 140-hour requirement, and is encouraged to stay in the lab as much as possible to gain hands-on experience in a real research setting.

Email: xingliu@purdue.edu


Dr. Yaohua Feng, Assistant Professor of Food Science

Evaluate a curriculum to teach food safety based upon the recently completed positive deviance interactive group approach. The curriculum built around the Fight BAC messages of Clean, Cook, Chill, and Separate plus Choose Food for Safety, includes practical safe handling information. The curriculum targets socially and financially disadvantaged families with young children. The intern will work with Dr. Feng to evaluate the curriculum among the target audiences, by using both self-reported survey data and observational coded data. Skills to learn: Reviewing relevant literature for use in interpreting findings and making recommendations. Designing survey instruments and developing protocol. Analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. Interpreting results. Writing scientific reports, and other communications for all key stakeholders.

Email: yhfeng@purdue.edu


Dr. Theresa Casey, Research Assistant Professor of Animal Sciences

Student will assist in all aspects of research in mammary gland biology and lactation from the mundane dish washing, to cell culture to working with large production animals at the farm (dairy cos and potentially pigs). These experiences will open up opportunities for further research, job opportunities, and post-graduate education (graduate school, vet school, dental school, etc).

Email: Theresa-casey@purdue.edu


Dr. Kevin Solomon, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering

Students from all disciplines are sought to develop mobile games, websites, devices that interact with living biological systems, genetically engineer microbes and/or create educational STEM activities for K-12 students. Students would join Purdue’s iGEM team, which annually competes against more than 300 teams in the premier synthetic biology competition. Students are challenged to solve a grand engineering challenge with biology while considering the societal implications of this design, and developing skills in leadership, communication among others.

Email: kvs@purdue.edu


Dr. Clint Chapple, Director of the Center for Plant Biology and Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry

Our lab does research on plant biochemical genetics using the model plant Arabidopsis. We are interested in how the phenylpropanoid pathway, a biochemical pathway that is important for plant survival and for humans' use of biomass, is organized and regulated. The student working on this project will learn about plant growth, genetics, and biochemical analysis.

Email: chapple@purdue.edu

Computer and Information Technology

Dr. Kathryn Siegfried-Spellar, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Technology

The research interns will work alongside law enforcement in the Tippecanoe High Tech Crime Unit (HTCU), which is a law enforcement digital forensics lab located in Mann Hall (Discovery Park). The HTCU is partners with the Cyber-forensics program in the Department of Computer & Information Technology. This internship provides students with hands-on experience as a digital forensic examiner; students will work with all forms of digital evidence, including mobile devices, hard drives, network traffic, social media artifacts, and audio/video media. As part of this internship, students are required to complete a research project on a digital forensics-related topic. Students will collaborate with their faculty mentor, Dr. Seigfried-Spellar, and the law enforcement officers of the HTCU to ensure the quality of their research project. At minimum, qualified students must pass a background check and have completed the CNIT 420/556 course (basic digital forensics).

Email: kspellar@purdue.edu


Education

Dr. Mandy Rispoli, Associate Professor of Educational Studies

My research lab develops and evaluates behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder. This internship would involve assisting in developing intervention materials, assisting in developing teacher training manuals and instructional guides, data collection during research sessions of children with autism, and entering and graphing data into our data system. Though not required, we are interested in someone who speaks Spanish to joining our lab and help us create bilingual materials for research participants.

Email: mrispoli@purdue.edu


Dr. Rose Mason, Assistant Professor of Special Education

This opportunity will provide an avenue for Summer Scholars to participate in an ongoing research project aimed at evaluating the impact of a social skills intervention aimed at improving social skills and social relationships for adolescents and young adults (college age) with autism. The intervention utilizes web-conferencing and tele-coaching (coaching from a distance utilizing bug-in-the-ear techniques) to help the participant with autism engage in social conversations and activities with their peers. The Summer Scholar would assist with carrying out the study, collecting data and managing the data base. The summer scholar would learn valuable skills for conducting applied research and broaden their knowledge of autism. Opportunities for authorship on peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations will also be available. There is a possibility that there will be an additional stipend/hourly pay however, this will not be clear until closer to the end of the spring semester.

Email: rmason3@purdue.edu


Engineering

Dr. Bill Hutzel, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology

As an engineering technology and STEM education researcher, I have a number of projects that require basic review, and comparisons using a spreadsheet or similar method. The work is basic, but provides us with a better understanding of the differences between STEM students in various fields and in some work comparisons to their colleagues in engineering. The data is already gathered, but help is needed to graph, and review averages, etc. The results of this research will appear in a variety of journal papers, based upon the participation of the undergraduate student they will be given credit for their work in these documents.

Email: aluciett@purdue.edu


Dr. Anne Lucietto, Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology

This research team is building a software platform for retrieving, analyzing, and managing vast amounts of visual data from the Internet. Some of the data is real-time from network cameras. Some other data is acquired from archives. The project has many different parts, including machine learning for analyzing images, web user interface, cloud resource management, and applications in emergency response. In summer 2018, the main focus is to analyze the data from the network cameras using computer vision technologies. The project's web site. NSF REU or research fund (restrictions may apply)."

Email: aluciett@purdue.edu


Dr. Yung-Hsiang Lu, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

The research is focused on the design and behavior of reinforced concrete structures. The research consists of conducting load tests on large reinforced concrete specimens at Bowen Laboratory. The opportunity will provide a student with exposure to hands-on research within a large structural testing lab. The student should be willing to help fabricate large reinforced concrete specimens and assist with the experimental tests. The need may also arise for reviewing data and preparing graphics for reporting purposes.

Email: yunglu@purdue.edu


Dr. Chris Williams, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

The research is focused on the design and behavior of reinforced concrete structures. The research consists of conducting load tests on large reinforced concrete specimens at Bowen Laboratory. The opportunity will provide a student with exposure to hands-on research within a large structural testing lab. The student should be willing to help fabricate large reinforced concrete specimens and assist with the experimental tests. The need may also arise for reviewing data and preparing graphics for reporting purposes.

Email: csw@purdue.edu


Dr. Vaneet Aggarwal, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering

In this project, we wish to implement cooperative video streaming, where multiple users would pool their resources together to watch the video at a screen ahead. Prototype implementation at multiple levels will be required. Students with EE/CS background are preferable.

Email: vaneet@purdue.edu


Dr. Daniel Ferguson, Research Associate Professor

We have multiple research streams that we will be investigating including NSF grant projects related to our research hypothesis on teamwork learning. Our research streams include 1. using and improving analytical models that test the quality of peer evaluations, 2. evaluating training interventions that potentially improve teamwork learning, working in conjunction with other collaborator schools like Arizona State and Ohio State. and 3 working with K12 schools experimenting with and assessing teamwork learning."

Email: dfergus@purdue.edu


Dr. Craig Goergen, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Small animal models serve as a useful tool to systematically explore mechanisms behind various cardiac diseases. In this scope, in vivo imaging has played a crucial role in monitoring cardiac function changes throughout disease progression. While high frequency four-dimensional ultrasound (4DUS) has recently been introduced for advanced murine cardiac imaging, broadening the capabilities of small animal cardiac imaging, this technique still requires validation. Using cine MRI as a gold-standard method for assessing cardiac function, we aim to demonstrate the accuracy of 4DUS-based measurements. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the precision of MRI and 4DUS employing a mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy.

Email: cgoergen@purdue.edu


Professor You-Yeon Won, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

A student(s) will be involved in a research project(s) that will develop a new nanoparticle radiotherapy enhancer, which allows us to combine radiation therapy (RT) with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for more efficient treatment of cancers. Specifically, the student(s) will be involved, tentatively, in two main tasks. The first task was to participate in writing a review article on the topic of nanoparticle-based cancer radio sensitization in collaboration with other group members; for the eight week summer period, the student(s) will be reviewing, on average, two articles every week and presenting review summaries to other co-authors. The second task is to help a senior graduate student(s) synthesize nanoparticle samples for use in RT-PDT studies. Lastly, the student(s) will also be helping perform various in vitro/in vivo toxicity and efficacy measurements on these nanoparticles. This plan is subject to change, revision or cancellation.

Email: yywon@ecn.purdue.edu

Health and Human Sciences

Dr. Louis Tay, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology

The project will involve doing lexical analyses of Twitter data on what people typically talk about with regard to (a) their jobs (i.e., satisfaction, complaints); (b) their health (i.e., exercise, diet). The goal is to develop a scheme to analyze Twitter data to create assessments of communities and cities.

Email: stay@purdue.edu


Dr. Kipling Williams, Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences

Students will get the opportunity to work in my lab on research related to the psychological effects of ostracism--the effects of being ignored and excluded.

Email: kipw@purdue.edu


Dr. Bruno Tesini Roseguini, Assistant Professor of Exercise Physiology

Next summer we will be conducting one experiment to determine the impact of heat therapy on skeletal muscle structure and function in a mouse model of peripheral arterial disease. Heat therapy will be applied by placing the animal in a flat bottom restrainer and immersing the hindlimb in water at 39ºC. Muscle capillarization will be determined using immunohistochemistry and force development and fatigue resistance will be evaluated using an isolated muscle test system. Students will participate in all steps of the project, including data collection and analysis. Examples of activities that will be performed by students include: 1) prepare the water bath and help monitor the animals' health status during the heat treatment sessions, 2) help with animal sacrifices and tissue processing, 3) perform quantification of histological parameters in muscle samples. Hourly pay ($10/hr) might be available for a total of 30 hours.

Email: brosegui@purdue.edu


Dr. Yumary Ruiz, Assistant Professor of Health Promotion and Public Health

We are conducting a study to develop and evaluate the effects of a physical activity-based positive youth development program for youth from low-income families. The purpose of this project is to examine the effects of the intervention on social relationships with peers and staff, psychological assets and well-being, and health risk behaviors. This is a longitudinal project that tracks children age 8-14 who participate in a summer program that runs mid-June through mid-July, and afterschool programs throughout the school year. Students who work with us over the summer will assist with conducting program staff education sessions, surveying and interviewing youth participants, and assisting with data management and analysis. This study is a collaboration that will involve working with faculty in the department of Health and Kinesiology in the areas of public health, sport and exercise psychology, and pedagogy.

Email: ruiz46@purdue.edu


Dr. Susie Swithers, Professor of Psychological Sciences

My lab investigates the effects of consuming non-nutritive sweeteners on brain and behavior in a rodent model. Work would involve assisting with experiments looking at protein expression, pharmacology and behavioral effects in developing rats given various types of sweeteners.

Email: swithers@purdue.edu


Dr. Nana Gletsu-Miller, Associate Professor of Nutrition Science

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a new epidemic disease in adolescents which occurs in 12.5 youths per 100,000 in the United States, and its incidence is rising. When it occurs in youth, T2D is challenging to treat and thus glycemic control is poor, often resulting in early development of disease complications. Prediabetes is an early stage of elevated blood glucose that does not reach the threshold for diagnosis of T2D, and at this stage, diabetes can be prevented through modification of diet and exercise to induce weight loss. Yet, for the estimated 13.3 million adolescents with prediabetes only two diabetes prevention programs have been successful and these are limited to academic settings. This is because weight reduction is difficult to achieve and sustain in youth. Adolescents are particularly associated with poor diet behaviors, such as excessive consumption of foods that are high in solid fat and added sugars and under-consumption of fiber containing foods. Moreover, many adolescents do not meet the recommendations for physical activity and are very sedentary. In addition, families often lack time and transportation resources to attend programs that are held in the academic and clinical settings and practitioners often lack resources. These issues have been identified as barriers that impede the success of behavior modification in adolescents. Personalized counseling that is delivered remotely, using mobile phones, by trained professionals, and incorporates self-monitoring of diet and activity behaviors, is an emerging approach that has been used to assist individuals to modify lifestyle behavior. Digital mobile health (m-Health) technologies provide a delivery modality that is individualized and convenient for families, and because it is less labor intensive, it can be provided on a large scale. Although m-Health is promising (17), an m-Health based diabetes prevention program intervention for adolescents has not been yet been evaluated. Research that leads to a better way to prevent T2D in adolescents is an urgent pursuit. In this proposal we will assess the effectiveness of an m-Health based intervention for reversing youth-onset T2D. Students will be involved in recruitment of participants and conducting dietary and clinical assessment as part of the protocol.

Email: ngletsum@purdue.edu


Dr. Jean Beaman, Assistant Professor of Sociology

This project builds off of my existing research on race and immigration in France to explore the history of state-sponsored violence against racial and ethnic minorities in France as well as the resonance of BlackLivesMatter as a social movement in France. What are the reverberations of state-sponsored violence against blacks beyond the United States? How is BLM a global movement and not just an American one? I would need a student to help with online research related to this topic.

Email: beamanj@purdue.edu


Dr. Jorge Banda, Assistant Professor of Health and Kinesiology

Dr. Banda’s research lab applies approaches from social psychology theory to build intrinsic motivation for physical activity and sports participation and alter children’s mindsets about their abilities (i.e., promoting a growth mindset). Students will assist with research projects taking place in youth team sports programs. Students will 1) help evaluate a measurement tool to improve the effectiveness of youth team sports coaching, 2) assist with data collection, and 3) assist with the design, implementation, and testing of a coach training intervention.

Email: bandaj@purdue.edu


Dr. Sugato Chakravarty, Professor of Consumer Science and Retailing

Typically the selected students work on an empirical project with a large data set on an actual finance research problem along with my PhD students. They are expected to write a report at the end of the summer with some preliminary results.

Email: sugato@purdue.edu


Dr. Stephen Lindemann, Assistant Professor of Food and Nutrition Science

Research in the Lindemann Lab focuses on understanding dietary controls on the gut microbiome. The majority of the current research in the lab seeks to understand how differences in the physical context and chemical structure of dietary fiber carbohydrates influences the composition of the gut microbiome, in turn, the host's metabolism or immune state. A Summer Stay intern could be involved in one of three projects, depending upon the availability of funds: 1) understanding the influence of bran particle size on gut microbial fermentation, 2) identifying the role of soluble fiber chemical structure on fermentation by the gut microbiota, and 3) development of a cost-effective microbiome assay to assess the safety of private wells. Depending upon the outcome of pending grant proposals, the lab may be able to offer $10/hr. for time worked in excess of the 140-hour requirement.

Email: lindemann@purdue.edu

Krannert School of Management

Dr. Richard Makadok, Professor of Management, Brock Family Chair in Strategic Management

Students will learn skills in using the world's leading mathematical modeling software, Wolfram Mathematica. See http://www.demonstrations.wolfram.com/ for great examples of the amazing capabilities of this extraordinary software. Once trained in the software, students will then assist in building mathematical models related to my research projects. For examples of my research, go to http://www.makadok.com and click on the gray "Publications" box in the middle of the page. Preference will be given to students who can continue working on these projects after the summer, as a paid research assistant job during the following academic year. In addition to the standard Summer Stay Scholars scholarship, I will pay a $12 per hour wage for the 140 hours of summer work, as well as for any ongoing research assistant work during the following academic year.

Email: rmakadok@purdue.edu

Pharmacy

Dr. Vincent Davisson, Professor of Medicinal and Molecular Pharmacy

The student projects involve contributions to small team projects focused on early-stage drug discovery for oncology and antiviral agents. The opportunities involve synthetic medicinal chemistry, protein biochemistry, chemical probe screening and testing, and drug evaluation in cellular pharmacology assays. A summer student will be able to develop skills in one of these basic techniques and engage in the overall process of hits to lead candidate identification.

Email: davisson@purdue.edu

Science

Dr. Andrew Hirsch, Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Physics I am using a new online homework system for PHYS 172 (Expert TA). This summer, I want to develop some new problems, some of which will make use of unique features offered in Expert TA such as the ability to have students construct free-body diagrams. In addition, I want to develop problems that address areas where students experience conceptual difficulties (such as interpreting graphical information pertaining to potential, kinetic, and total energy of a system). I have many more areas targeted for problem development. I am able to contribute an additional $1000.

Email: hirsch@purdue.edu


Dr. Corey Thompson, Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry

Magnetic materials are used in many applications such as credit cards, hard drives, magnetic refrigeration, electric motors, etc. Although a vast range of magnetic solids is available for these purposes, our ability to improve their efficiency and discover new materials remains paramount to the technological progress and economic profitability in the areas above. Together with a graduate student mentor, the summer student will design experiments to synthesize new multifunctional magnetic oxides. The student will use a variety of characterization techniques (e.g. X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric measurements, magnetization) and examine how chemical modifications affect the structural and physical properties of these materials.

Email: thomp493@purdue.edu


Dr. Ann Kirchmaier, Associate Professor of Biochemistry

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Epigenetics. Student will conduct primary hypothesis-based research, learn to design experiments and interpret results. Student will utilize genetic, biochemical, or nutritional strategies to assess functions of evolutionarily conserved proteins involved in regulating gene expression or DNA repair using the budding yeast model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Email: alkirchmaier@gmail.com


Dr. Catherine Searle, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

The Searle lab primarily studies the ecology of infectious disease in freshwater systems. During the summer, we will be performing multiple studies including 1. experiments to understand the effects of eutrophication on the susceptibility of zooplankton to disease, 2. surveys and experiments to quantify the effects of invasive zooplankton on epidemics in native species, and 3. field surveys of amphibian disease. Students will work closely with the Searle lab’s technician and/or graduate students to help with these ongoing projects and potentially complete their own, independent project. Exact projects will be determined based on the interests of the student and timing of the student’s classes.

Email: searlec@purdue.edu


Dr. David Thompson, Professor of Chemistry

One student would be involved in preparing materials for testing in cell culture and animal models for their efficacy in delivering small molecule therapeutics as anti-cancer agents. The other student would be involved in developing flow chemistry methodology for the synthesis of biologically active compounds.

Email: davethom@purdue.edu


Dr. Mark Christie, Assistant Professor of Biological Science and Forestry

We are looking for an undergraduate to genotype salmon from Lake Michigan at sex-specific markers. The goal of this project is to determine whether life history variation in the Great Lakes (where the species are introduced) is similar to their native range. More details about our lab can be found here: https://www.bio.purdue.edu/lab/christie/

Email:
christ99@purdue.edu


Professor Douglas Comer, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science

The Internet of Things (IoT) includes autonomous devices (sensors and actuators) controllable from a smart phone. Our project is investigating network protocols for wireless IoT devices. We have created a testbed that allows protocols to be tested, and are looking for students to work with our team of grad and undergrad students. Specifically, we are looking for students who wil write and run scripts that test protocols under a variety of conditions. Students who join the project for the summer do not need to be familiar with computer networks or IoT, but must be interested in learning about them. Programming experience is also required.

Email: comer@cs.purdue.edu


Dr. Greg Michalski, Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry

Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are a major concern because they can impair drinking water supplies and impact human health. We are researching how nutrient uptake by algae and cyanobacteria is altered by temperature during HAB events and how this changes the isotopic composition of the nutrient. The student researcher would help conduct incubation experiments and sample water from within the Wabash watershed. $500 supplement with fellowship.

Email: gmichalski@purdue.ed


Dr. Daniel Suter, Professor of Biological Sciences

Our lab studies molecular and cellular mechanisms of axonal growth and guidance using in vitro and in vivo assays and advanced light microscopy. Our research aims at better understanding of nervous system development as well as the development of treatments for injuries and developmental and degenerative disorders of the nervous system. A major focus of our current work is the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal development. In this summer stay scholar project, the student will work with a graduate student and participate in the phenotypic characterization of new zebrafish lines that are deficient in a specific enzyme complex that produces ROS referred to as NADPH oxidase. The work will involve zebrafish husbandry, genotyping, and fluorescence microscopy analyzing the anatomy of the developing nervous system in zebrafish embryos. For more information: http://suterlab.bio.purdue.edu

Email: dsuter@purdue.edu


Dr. Dennis Minchella, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, College of Science

Our lab focuses on the population biology, evolution, and genetics of host-parasite interactions using both molecular biology and experimental field approaches. Summer projects may range from exploring the role of parasites in frog behavior to assessing the impact of parasites in the dynamics of ecosystem nutrient cycling.

Email: dennism@purdue.edu


Purdue Polytechnic Institute

Dr. Aniket Kate, Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum have emerged as a paradigm shift for the way payment systems work today. They rely on the blockchain, a technology that has been proven useful in a vast number of applications other than monetary transactions. Many companies today are tailoring the blockchain technology to their business logic and successfully developing applications for credit settlement networks, supply chain, IoT and beyond. However, these separate efforts are leading to incompatible individual systems. This contrasts with our highly interconnected world and it is inevitable to see that soon these blockchains will need to operate with each other, effectively forming a network of blockchains where transactions can flow through a sequence of blockchains, similar how the network of networks (i.e., the Internet) works today. Towards enabling the Internet of Value, in this project, we will design and evaluate the cryptographic and distributed systems tools required to move money the same way as the information/data moves today.

Project Webpage.
Email: aniket@purdue.edu


Dr. Tim McGraw, Assistant Professor of Computer Graphics Technology

Assist in developing the user interface and interaction techniques for a virtual reality visualization of neuroanatomy. The structure of the human brain is complex, but interactive VR offers students and researchers the ability to explore the shapes of regions and spatial relations between them. Previous experience programming in C/C++ is required. OpenGL or Unreal engine experience is a plus.

Email: tmcgraw@purdue.edu


Veterinary Medicine

Dr. GuangJun Zhang, John T. and Winifred M. Hayward Assistant Professor of Genetic Research

Our research is focusing on human cancer driver gene discovery using zebrafish cancer models. We use a variety of tools such as CRISPR and transposon-based transgenesis for our research. Students will not only gain some experiences with modern molecular and cellular biology, but also learn the zebrafish model for studying human diseases.

Email: gjzhang@purdue.edu


Megan LaFollette, Graduate Research Assistant, Comparative Pathobiology

Our lab focuses on evaluating animal welfare using natural behavior and physical health as assessment tools. We need a qualified, detail oriented undergraduate student to assist graduate researchers with video and textual data analysis. The student may have one of several responsibilities depending on project progression. The student may be responsible for observing and recording behavioral data for a project(s) that may involve mouse, rat, and/or pig subjects. The student may be responsible for coding open-ended text responses from laboratory personnel about laboratory animal enrichment. This is an excellent opportunity for a student interested in animal behavior/welfare as they will learn an overview of the research process, be well trained in identifying behaviors based on specific ethograms or coding text based on thematic analysis, and may have the opportunity to learn additional lab methodology depending on the progression of various projects. This student will likely be involved in a study looking at the current status of enrichment of laboratory animals, attitudes towards this enrichment and animals, and professional quality of laboratory personnel."

Email: lafollet@purdue.edu


Dr. Maggie O'Haire, Assistant Professor of Human-Animal Interaction

Students will work as Research Assistants on two studies involving human-animal interaction. The first study aims to evaluate the effects of service dogs on veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The second study aims to evaluate the impact that facility dogs (e.g., dogs trained to work in pediatric hospitals) have on their handlers. RA duties include: recruiting participants, preparing all study materials, tracking each participant's study progress using online data management tools (e.g., REDCap), entering data, and other lab tasks as needed. We are looking for organized, self-motivated, and dependable undergraduate students to work with our team.

Email: maggie.ohaire@gmail.com

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