Research Opportunities

Agriculture  

Yaohua Feng, Assistant Professor of Food Science   

Certain poor food safety handling practices are notoriously difficult to change. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s food safety survey report showed that thermometer-use among consumers has not increased significantly over the past decade. There are many barriers to thermometer-use in both cooking and food storage applications. This project will develop and evaluate risk communication tools and education materials to improve compliance with thermometer use among consumers and food workers. The intern will work on the following items: Observation data coding and analyzing; Field work and observation data collection; Coordinating experiments and scheduling sessions with participants; Content analysis of provided literature or other archive references.

Emailyfengchi@purdue.edu


Gordon McNickle, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

I am a plant ecologist. In my lab, we ask questions about species diversity, and plant community structure. For example, imagine an Indiana forest with 20 species of trees. We want to know: why 20 species instead of, say, 100 or 3? Why those particular 20 species instead of some different assemblage of 20 species? To answer these questions we often measure how trees and other plants grow depending on the environment, and the species that surround them. This internship would allow students to contribute to these efforts by learning about experimental plant ecology, forestry or ecophysiology. We are a diverse lab, and strive to create a welcoming environment for undergraduates from all backgrounds. More details about our lab can be found here: http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~gmcnickl/index.html

Emailgmcnickle@purdue.edu


Darcy Telenko, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

I am a field crop pathologist. In my lab, we research the biology and management of soil borne and foliar pathogens of agronomic crops (corn, soybean, and wheat). This research encompasses four major themes that include the exploration of new bio-pesticide options to improve disease management, evaluation of host resistance, integration of new chemistries or tools into cropping systems, and the detection and monitoring of pathogen populations to minimize and/or detect the development of fungicide resistance or impact of new diseases in field crops. This opportunity would allow students to contribute to these efforts by giving a hands-on research experience in applied plant pathology. The opportunity would include a mixture of collecting data and samples outside in the field, and then isolating pathogens and processing samples back in the lab on campus. In addition, the student will have opportunities to visit farms across the state and learn about the impact of plant diseases on crop production.

Email: dtelenko@purdue.edu


Gyeong Mee Yoon, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

A student will have an experience in my lab doing a research related to the understanding of how plant controls the production of ethylene, a plant hormone that is known to control fruit ripening

Emailyoong@purdue.edu 


Yun Zhou, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

Dr. Zhou's research focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the plant stem function and regulation. The summer stay student will get opportunities to use molecular genetics approaches to characterize the function of several candidate genes in control of plant stem cells.


Email: zhouyun@purdue.edu


Leonor Boavida, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology

The Boavida lab aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the function of plant gametes and processes of cell-cell recognition in plant fertilization. The ultimate goal is to elucidate basic principles underlying a fundamental biological process that sustains life and plant diversity and be able to translate these discoveries into novel and more efficient breeding strategies aimed to increase and stabilize crop productivity. This internship will allow students to participate in on-going studies or work in small research projects with assistance from graduate students. Students will learn about plant growth and reproduction using genetics, cell and molecular biology tools.


Emaillboavida@purdue.edu 


Brad Kim

Unlocking the role of heat shock proteins in postmortem protein degradation of beef muscles

Providing consistently high quality and wholesome meat products to consumers is crucial to the continued success of the meat industry. The purpose of this research is to determine the role of small heat shock protein (HSP) in postmortem protein degradation of muscles. Anti-apoptotic functions of HSP have been well identified, but its potential impact on endogenous proteolytic enzyme activity is largely unknown. This study will determine the involvement of HSP in postmortem protein degradation of beef muscles. Student will have hands-on experience by performing assays to observe and quantifying the presence of small heat shock proteins present in samples, and interpreting results. Student will assist graduate students in any way needed, especially as is relevant to studies in small heat shock proteins.

Previous lab working experience will be desirable.

Animal Sciences/Food Science/ABE/Biochemistry or closely related


Emailbradkim@purdue.edu&#


Ann Kirchmaier

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Epigenetics.

Student will conduct primary hypothesis-based research, learn to design experiments and interpret results. Student will utilize genetic, biochemical, or nutritional strategies to assess functions of evolutionarily conserved metabolic enzymes and how their metabolic intermediates influence gene expression using the budding yeast model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.


Emailkirchmaier@purdue.edu

Engineering

Daniel Ferguson, Managing Director CATME, Engineering Education

CATME provides team formation, peer evaluation and teamwork training tools to over 7,000 instructors and 200,000 students per month. The CATME business operates and supports these faculty and students use of the CATME system; designs, develops and improves the system’s functionality; designs, develops and improves the training and support tools used by students and instructors using the CATME system; and does both funded theoretical research [NSF grants] and practical research on teamwork learning. CATME is a non-profit recharge center business housed in the College of Engineering. All UG CATME student employees are part of an INSPIRE Professional Development Cohort.  Develop research designs, collect and analyze data, develop/acquire and implement new/existing analytic models, do literature searches and write and present research papers at regional and national professional conferences.  Test the effectiveness of new features in the CATME system at improving the quality of peer feedback.  Engineering, Math, or Statistics Majors or equivalent. Must be interested in doing and publishing research. Sophmore or Junior status required.  This will be the third summer we have supported summer scholars and all of our scholars have successfully produced research papers. CATME pays UG wages for the summer scholar required 140 research work hours.

Email:  dfergus@purdue.edu   


Craig Goergen, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Novel 4-dimensional ultrasound (4DUS) can be used to evaluate murine cardiac function. Although conventional short-axis motion-mode (SAX MM) ultrasound and cine MRI are two of the most prevalent strategies used for quantifying cardiac function, standard ultrasound is limited by substantial geometric assumptions and MRI requires large and costly systems with substantial infrastructure requirements. This project will be to help develop a novel automated 4DUS technique that provides comparable information to cine MRI through spatiotemporally synced imaging of cardiac motion.

Email: cgoergen@purdue.edu


Allison Godwin, Assistant Professor of Engineering Education

Roughly half of the students entering engineering programs across the country do not believe in human-caused climate change. Without this belief, action to address the issue is less likely to occur. The formation of engineers during the undergraduate degree is an opportunity to correct this misconception and help students develop skills to better meet societal needs more sustainably. This project identifies factors in engineering student experiences during undergraduate programs that predict their beliefs about climate change. A survey of 2,095 undergraduates was distributed at 48 U.S. institutions during Fall 2017. A second survey of approximately the name number has been distributed in Fall 2018. We are in the process of building quantitative models (hierarchical regression and time-series regression) to understand what experience may affect climate change beliefs and action. Students interested in this project will learn basics of large scale social science survey research. Students will gain an understanding of the ethics of human subjects research, survey data collection, data cleaning, and data analysis. All statistical analyses will be conducted using the statistical software, R. No prior statistics coursework or software familiarity is required.

Email: godwina@purdue.edu


Hua Cai, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Environmental Ecology Engineering

Understanding the use of new mobility systems. This research aims to survey students in different campus to understand how they are using the available new mobility options (e.g., shared bikes, car sharing, shared e-scooters, shared e-bikes) to fulfill their daily travel demands (for example, whether the shared e-scooter trips are displacing car trips or walking trips, or are actually new trips induced by the new option). The students will be responsible for: 1) design the survey for data collection, 2) distribute the online survey for data collection, 3) analyze the data using R or Python, 4) visualize the results using different data visualization tools, and 5) summarize the research findings in a report.

Email: huacai@purdue.edu


Hua Cai, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Environmental Ecology Engineering

The sustainability of autonomous vehicles. This project aims to model the use of autonomous vehicles under different scenarios and evaluate its environmental sustainability impacts. The student is expected to 1) conduct a literature review to identify proper scenario inputs, 2) run agent-based models (developed by a PhD student) using the identified inputs, 3) analyze model outputs in R, and 4) summarize the research findings in a report.

Email: huacai@purdue.edu


Kevin Solomon, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering

Students from all disciplines are sought to develop mobile games, websites, devices that interact with living biological systems, genetically engineer microbes and/or create educational STEM activities for K-12 students. Students would join Purdue’s iGEM team, which annually competes against more than 300 teams in the premier synthetic biology competition. Students are challenged to solve a grand engineering challenge with biology while considering the societal implications of this design, and developing skills in leadership, communication among others.

Email: kvs@purdue.edu


Vaneet Aggarwal, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering

Reinforcement learning (RL) is an area of machine learning concerned with how software agents ought to take actions in an environment so as to maximize some notion of cumulative reward. We will consider applications of reinforcement learning to transportation, including ride sharing for the next generation autonomous fleets.

Students in CS/ECE/Stats/Math are encouraged to apply.

Email: vaneet@purdue.edu

Vaneet Aggarwal, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering

Deep learning has many applications, however suffer from high number of parameters which overfit when there is not enough data or large computation. In this project, we will explore efficient feature extraction and evaluation of classification algorithms for biomedical applications.

Email: vaneet@purdue.edu


Chris Williams, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

The research is focused on the design and behavior of reinforced concrete structures. Depending on the exact research needs at the time of the summer program, the work may consist of conducting load tests on reinforced concrete specimens at Bowen Laboratory and/or assistance with reviewing data and preparing graphics for reporting purposes. The opportunity will provide a student with exposure to research within a large structural testing lab. The student should be willing to help fabricate and test reinforced concrete specimens.

Email: csw@purdue.edu

Health and Human Sciences

Alvin Kao, Assistant Professor of Health and Kinesiology

We are conducting research to determine the acute effects of traditional aerobic exercise and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) exercise on cognitive function and neuro-electric brain activities in children and young adults. The goal of this study is to develop exercise interventions that can maximize exercise-induced benefits on cognition and brain function. Research activities that will be performed by students include: 1) conducting metabolic exercise stress testing to evaluate cardiovascular fitness (i.e., VO2max), 2) delivering exercise interventions through high-speed treadmill and body-weight exercise, 3) administering computerized and paper-and-pencil cognitive tasks, and 4) recording and analyzing electroencephalogram (EEG) data.

Email: kao28@purdue.edu 


Louis Tay, Associate Professor of Psychological Sciences

We are conducting research to investigate the potential effectiveness and fairness of video interviews assessed by artificial intelligence. The project aims to develop an initial system for automatically assessing job applicants from video interviews and to develop frameworks for ensuring artificial intelligence systems are bias free to ensure equal employment opportunities for people of all backgrounds. Research activities performed by students will include running research participants, helping to clean and code data, and assessing applicants in mock job interviews.

Email: stay@purdue.edu


Bridgette Tonnsen, Assistant Professor of Psychology

My research investigates early development of children at elevated risk for autism and other forms of pediatric psychopathology. Summer undergraduate researchers are involved in a variety of projects, including a laboratory-based study of toddlers and a telehealth-based study of children with rare neuro-genetic syndromes. Across studies, our research group employs a wide variety of clinical, behavioral, and psychophysiological methods.

Email: btonnsen@purdue.edu


Jorge Banda, Assistant Professor of Health and Kinesiology

College of Health and Human Sciences Dr. Banda’s research focuses on developing and evaluating community-based interventions to decrease sedentary behavior, increase physical activity, and prevent and treat obesity in children. His current research takes place in after-school team sports programs. Students will assist with the implementation and evaluation of a coach-training intervention on child physical activity and health. This includes assisting with intervention delivery and data collection.

Email: bandaj@purdue.edu

Monica Kasting, Assistant Professor of Health and Kinesiology

Dr. Kasting's research uses social epidemiology, behavioral oncology, and mixed methods to examine cancer prevention. She works mainly with physicians identifying multilevel barriers to various cancer prevention behaviors including uptake of human papillomavirus vaccination and increasing hepatitis C virus screening. Students will assist in various aspects of her research projects including: 1) helping to collect and analyze survey data, 2) assisting with qualitative interviews as well as qualitative data analysis, and 3) assist with developing and refining a new questionnaire identifying possible areas for a future intervention in primary care clinics.

Email: mlkastin@purdue.edu


Jessica Lougheed, Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

This opportunity is to work on a project examining how emotions in the context of parent-adolescent relationships are related to internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression and anxiety). Students will be involved in such tasks as reviewing the scientific literature, participant recruitment, and data management.

Email: jlougheed@purdue.edu


Alexander Francis, Associate Professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

Students in my lab help with conducting and analyzing the results of experiments investigating the effects of noise exposure on behavioral and physiological measures related to attention, mental effort, stress, and annoyance. Our lab is small, so students will work directly with the faculty investigator alongside other undergraduate and graduate students. Duties will depend in part on students' interests and capabilities. We particularly welcome students who are interested both in working directly with human subjects and in applying signal processing methods to better characterize and understand physiological measurements including ECG and EEG.

Email: francisa@purdue.edu


Marxa Figueiredo, Associate Professor of Basic Medical Sciences

We have one or two positions for undergrads to perform molecular biology experiments relating to musculoskeletal health (arthritis, bone biology).

Email: mlfiguei@purdue.edu


AJ Schwichtenberg, Assistant Professor of Human Devleopment and Family Studies

Through the Sleep and Developmental Studies Laboratory at Purdue University students will become an integral component of studies on sleep, autism, and/or early childhood development. Independent research projects are encouraged. With several active studies, we are happy to customize your experience to fit your interests and needs. Here are a few example projects: Sleep and Health in the Home - The Shh Study Veteran Sleep and PTSD Study (a randomized control trial) Infant Behavioral Sleep Intervention Study (a randomized control trial) Family Routines Intervention Study (an intervention designed to improve social communication scaffolding for infants developing at risk for ASD) Developmental Risk and Sleep Study (a longitudinal study that followed infants from 6 to 36 months of age to assess the roles of sleep in at risk ASD development) Sleep with Me Study (a randomized control trial of an adult sleep onset intervention)

Email: ajschwichtenberg@purdue.edu


Libby Richards, Assistant Professor of Nursing

You will be part of an interdisciplinary team of nursing, human development & family studies, and health & kinesiology. We are conducting a novel pilot study using innovative technology to identify how paired walking among young to midlife spouse’s impacts balance and gait parameters. Undergraduate students will work with faculty and graduate students during data collection. Tasks include setting up data collection site, interacting with participants, and assisting with data management.

Email: erichards@purdue.edu


Arielle Borovsky, Assistant Professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

We invite students to join the Purdue Language, Learning and Meaning Acquisition Laboratory (LLAMA lab). Our group has several ongoing projects that explore how children learn words and understand speech and we use a variety of computational and experimental methods to explore these questions. Depending on your skills and interests, specific tasks may include: (1) Developing experimental tasks, (2) Testing and Recruitment, (3) Data analysis and coding. This opportunity would be a good match for students who have an interest in cognitive and linguistic development. Students should also have an interest in developing technical proficiency (prior experience with Python,R, Matlab, graph-network analysis or video/graphic editing would be a bonus). Students should also be comfortable interacting with children and families.

Email: aborovsky@purdue.edu


Kaitlyn Gilland, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Psychological Sciences

Research in the Fox Lab focuses on brain-gut interactions mediated by the vagus nerve that regulate eating and body weight. Students would be expected to carry out basic lab duties such as solution making, preparing materials for experiments and basic animal handling. Students would also be involved in the genotyping of transgenic mice. This would include DNA extraction, polymerase chain reactions and gel electrophoresis. All necessary training will be provided, however coming in with a basic knowledge of how to use general lab equipment (pipeteman, scales, graduated cylinders etc.) is required. Prior work with animals is not required. More advanced applicants could be able to do more advanced work. This opportunity could also lead to a research spot for Fall of 2019.

Email: kgilland@purdue.edu


Chelsea (Qianqi) Song, Assistant Professor of Psychological Sciences

Our lab conducts research aim to answer questions evolving around personnel selection (e.g., hiring, promotion) such as what predicts workplace outcome (e.g., personality, vocational interests), how to measure them, and how to make decisions. Over the summer, students will have the opportunity to participate in one of the two projects: a) investigation of the impact of selection and recruitment practices on employee's workplace experience (e.g., satisfaction, turnover) using a number of large-scale real-world datasets; b) development and evaluation of selection decision models to enhance diversity in hiring (reduce adverse impact) through computer simulations. Students in my lab will have the opportunity to learn R and RStudio (programming language/statistical software) to conduct data analysis with real-world workplace data. Skill in R (and RStudio) is seen as prominent in graduate school application and by I-O psychology positions in data-driven companies. The lab would offer possible research opportunities during the following academic year.

Email: qcsong@purdue.edu


Yumary Ruiz, Assistant Professor in Public Health and Physical Activity

We are conducting a study to develop and evaluate the effects of a physical activity-based positive youth development program for youth from low-income families. The purpose of this project is to examine the effects of the intervention on social relationships with peers and staff, psychological assets and well-being, and health risk behaviors. This is a longitudinal project that tracks children age 8-14 who participate in a summer program that runs mid-June through mid-July, and afterschool programs throughout the school year. Students who work with us over the summer will assist with conducting program staff education sessions, surveying and interviewing youth participants, and assisting with data management and analysis. This study is a collaboration that will involve working with faculty in the department of Health and Kinesiology in the areas of public health, sport and exercise psychology, and pedagogy.

Email: ruiz46@purdue.edu


Susie Swithers, Professor of Psychological Sciences

Students will assist with studies that examine the effects of sweeteners on a variety of behavioral and metabolic outcomes in rodents. The work involves behavioral studies along with physiological measurements including evaluating protein expression in the brain and other tissues.

Email: swithers@purdue.edu/a>


Kristine Marceau, Assistant Professor of Human Devleopment and Family Studies

The Biobehavioral Development Lab is a research laboratory in the Human Development and Family Studies department at Purdue University dedicated to understanding the normal variations in how children develop in order to gain insight for predicting and preventing adolescent substance use and related behavior and relationship problems. Students will become an integral component of a research lab dedicated to understanding how genetic influences, prenatal environments, hormones, and family environments together shape children’ and adolescents’ behavior. There are opportunities for student-led research within the scope of the lab aims, interaction with participants, and/or wet lab experience preparing biological samples for epigenetic characterization and hormone assay. Research tasks my include: reading research articles and writing summaries of findings, researching the functions of specific genes, basic statistical description of data and data management, data collection in home visits or the wet lab.

Email: kristinemarceau@purdue.edu


Tom Redick, Associate Professor of Psychological Sciences

Our Applied Cognition Lab investigates memory, attention, and related abilities such as reading comprehension, problem solving, and multitasking. Research assistants are involved in all aspects of research in the lab. This includes task piloting, participant recruitment, data collection, data back-up and organization, and statistical analyses. The student will receive direct mentoring and advising on research design, statistical analyses, study-related programming, and guidance on developing the appropriate experience and knowledge to further career options upon graduating from Purdue.

Email: tredick@purdue.edu

Honors College

Jason Ware, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

City planners have used community indicators for more than 100 years to measure the interdependence of social, environmental, and economic inputs that influence a community's well-being. The information that community indicators provide illustrates community values, and tells the story of where communities have been, where they are now, and where they are going socially, environmentally, and economically. Community indicators research is often structured within one of four frames: 1) quality of life, 2) sustainability, 3) community performance, and 4) healthy communities. The resultant indices are often used to determine and rank a city's livability. Our goal is to investigate and co-create indicators of community well-being related to quality of life within an urban poor community in Lafayette Indiana. The underlying premise is that urban poor communities across the globe have negligible influence in determining the criteria for measuring a city's livability. We imagine that material realities of poverty manifest in issues of failing infrastructure and poor living conditions that compromise healthy living, and that social realities manifest in decreased educational outcomes. All of which suggests that urban poor communities may produce collectively a set of indicators that create a different picture of a city's livability. We will work with select urban poor communities to create and capture these indicators, the result of which will be a set of inclusive indicators for influencing local policy that can in turn impact social, environmental, and economic outcomes and community well-being.

Email: jaware@purdue.edu

College of Liberal Arts

Jean Beaman, Assistant Professor of Sociology

My research project focuses on the social movement Black Lives Matter in both the United States and France, and the broader issue of state-sponsored violence in both contexts. Research assistants are needed to code data, collect journal articles and literature, and do related tasks.

Email: beamanj@purdue.edu

Science

Greg Michalski, Associate Professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Science

Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are a major concern because they can impair drinking water supplies and impact human health. We are researching how nutrient uptake by algae and cyanobacteria is altered by temperature during HAB events and how this changes the isotopic composition of the nutrient. The student researcher would help conduct incubation experiments and sample water from within the Wabash watershed. $500 supplement with fellowship.

Email: gmichals@purdue.edu


Corey Thompson, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Magnetic materials are used in many applications such as credit cards, hard drives, magnetic refrigeration, electric motors, etc. Although a vast range of magnetic solids is available for these purposes, our ability to improve their efficiency and discover new materials remains paramount to the technological progress and economic profitability in the areas above. Together with a graduate student mentor, the summer student will design experiments to synthesize new multifunctional magnetic oxides. The student will use a variety of characterization techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric measurements, magnetization) and examine how chemical modifications affect the structural and physical properties of these materials.

Email: cmthompson@purdue.edu


Catherine Searle, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

The Searle lab studies the ecology of infectious disease in freshwater systems. During the summer, we will be performing multiple studies including 1. experiments to understand the effects of increased salinity (from road salt runoff) on amphibian diseases, 2. experiments investigating the role of community diversity in the establishment of invasive zooplankton, and 3. field surveys of amphibians and zooplankton (Daphnia). Students will work closely with the Searle labs technician and/or graduate students to help with these ongoing studies and potentially complete their own, independent project. Exact projects will be determined based on the interests of the student and timing of the student’s classes.

Email: searlec@purdue.edu


Douglas Comer, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science

A New Data Center Network Computing is moving to ""the cloud"". Originally, only Internet services, such as a company's web server, ran in a cloud data center. Now, cloud providers (including Amazon and Microsoft) offer cloud infrastructure that anyone can lease, and enterprises are moving all their applications to the cloud, including payroll, inventory, and sales. Cloud is especially important for data science applications (big data) and services associated with the Internet of Things. Our project is working on a new network architecture for cloud data centers. The new network uses an innovative interpretation of network addresses that makes it possible to forward packets at higher speeds. Interestingly, we can use the new interpretation with existing Ethernet switch hardware and retain backward compatibility with the Internet, which means that the new network can be used inside a data center without changing any of the applications outside of the data center. During the summer, we will be implementing and measuring the new network on a miniature data center (a small testbed of Ethernet switches and servers). The project is a chance for an undergrad to get their hands on actual networking equipment, learn how a data center works, and help write network control software.

Email: comer@cs.purdue.edu


Andrew Hirsch, Professor of Physics

hirsch@purdue.edu

We will study the correlation between student's performance in PHYS 172 with various quantities, such as performance on homework, recitation assignments, online quizzes, etc. We will examine these relationships for different student demographic groups, level of preparation, etc. This is part of a multi-year effort to understand why some students, who seem capable of passing, do not, and what I, as an instructor can do to improve learning outcomes.

Email: hirsch@purdue.edu


Guang Lin, Associate Professor of Math and Mechanical Engineering

Deep Machine Learning on Time Series Prediction: In the research fields of engineering, social sciences, and biology, the data analysis of time series play a crucial role. During the summer study, the students will investigate a number of deep machine learning algorithms to learn the effective regression models of time series. The goal is (1) quantifying the uncertainty and making good predictions; (2) preventing overfitting and being able to model various complex time series datasets.

Email: guanglin@purdue.edu


Daniel Chavas, Assistant Professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

Research opportunities in the Climate and Extreme Weather Laboratory will focus on analyzing data related to hurricanes, tornadoes, or other interesting extreme weather phenomena for the purpose of better understanding the basic physics of how these phenomena work in the context of a changing climate.

Email: dchavas@purdue.edu


Margaret Gitau, Assoicate Professor of Agriculture and Biological Engineering

The hydrologic model DHM-WM was developed to provide spatial information on hydrologic components for determining critical source areas. The spatial details provided by the model will help in the development of precise and cost-effective watershed management solutions. A great advantage of DHM-WM is in its simplicity and the small number of parameters that require calibration. However, current configuration does not allow extensive use beyond the developers. The goal of this project is to enhance DHM-WM to enable its use by a broad range of users. Specifically, to: 1) improve DHM-WMs computational efficiency; and, 2) to provide an enhanced GUI to facilitate model use.

Email: mgitau@purdue.edu


Margaret Gitau, Assoicate Professor of Agriculture and Biological Engineering

Suitability of Simulated Climate Data for Use in Water Resources Modeling in East Africa Daily weather data are needed to run hydrologic, water quality, and crop-growth models. In many areas of East Africa, there is a general lack of measured weather data, making it difficult to use modeling approaches for water resources assessments and decision-making. Weather generators provide means by which daily weather data can be simulated. These generators need to be evaluated prior to being applied in new areas and/or those with climate characteristics distinct from those in which the generators were developed. In general, generated weather data should go beyond matching values with measured data to mirroring the statistical properties and essential characteristics of measured data. With climate change concerns and thus the use of generated data in future-cast studies, it is especially important that generated data capture anticipated variabilities in climate. This study is aimed at testing the suitability of data generated using the weather generator LARS-WG for use in East Africa. The student will be expected to simulate weather data using LARS-WG and compare outputs with observed data. Required experience: Water resources, hydrology, statistical analysis.

Email: mgitau@purdue.edu


Margaret Gitau, Assoicate Professor of Agriculture and Biological Engineering

Code Optimization and GUI Development for DHM-WM Hydrologic Model. The hydrologic model DHM-WM was developed to provide spatial information on hydrologic components for determining critical source areas. The spatial details provided by the model will help in the development of precise and cost-effective watershed management solutions. A great advantage of DHM-WM is in its simplicity and the small number of parameters that require calibration. However, current configuration does not allow extensive use beyond the developers. The goal of this project is to enhance DHM-WM to enable its use by a broad range of users. Specifically, to: 1) improve DHM-WMs computational efficiency; and, 2) to provide an enhanced GUI to facilitate model use. Required Experience: Python, GUI design, programming, and testing.

Email: mgitau@purdue.edu


Robin Tanamachi, Assistant Professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Science

Project title: Supervised identification of convective boundary layers in VORTEX-Southeast FMCW radar observations using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique. In cooperation with collaborators from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Spain (UPC), the student will identify convective boundary layer heights in 14 weeks worth of UMass FMCW vertically pointing radar observations collected during VORTEX-Southeast 2016/2017. Note that the code contributed by UPC collaborators is written in MATLAB, but scripted to run with only minimal input from operators. Therefore, MATLAB programming experience is desirable, but not required.

Email: rtanamachi@purdue.edu


Wen-wen Tung, Associate Professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Science

Learn by working with data science applications with geoscience data --- I am updating a hybrid (online and face-to-face) course on analyzing and computing with data in Earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences typically taught to undergraduate senior and beginning graduate students. The participating student will learn to and help create R Markdown documents of exercises with real data analysis, especially using nonparametric fitting and resampling techniques. The subject-matter problems, such as long-term climate trend and variability of global or regional temperature and rainfall, to be solved with the data analysis are the student's research topics.

Email: wwtung@purdue.edu


Dennis Minchella, Associate Dean and Professor of Bilogical Sciences

The Minchella lab explores host-parasite interactions from genes to the ecosystems using a variety of laboratory and field techniques. Summer Stay Scholars may be involved in various projects including the role of parasites in frog behavior to the role of parasites in whole ecosystems. Active projects aim to understand the impacts of wildlife parasites on animal behavior and physiology.

Email: dennism@purdue.edu


Isaac Harris, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

My research interests are in the applications and analysis of Differential Equations. In particular, the study Inverse Problems for Differential Equations which can be seen as determining unknown quantities from measurable data. Inverse Problems has applications in non-destructive testing such as medical imaging and shape reconstruction. The goal for the summer is for the students to learn how to write simple MATLAB code, solve differential/integral equations, connect techniques from Calculus and Scientific Computing to solve an inverse problem that arises in wave propagation. The projects that I have in mind are to look at the non-linear spring-mass system and numerically recover unknown objects from acoustic data.

Email: iharris1107@gmail.com


Purdue Polytechnic Institute

William Hutzel, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology

The Biowall is an innovative plant based filter that improves indoor air quality in energy efficient homes that are tightly sealed and do not allow sufficient outside air circulation. Research is being conducting in both a laboratory and a full scale home to refine and ultimately commercialize the biowall. The Applied Energy Laboratory is used to evaluate next generation biowall designs and control strategies for water, light, and air flow. A full scale biowall is also being evaluated in a home near the Purdue campus. Student researchers will have an opportunity to work in the laboratory and the research home during this project.

Email: hutzelw@purdue.edu


Anne Lucietto, Assistant Professor Mechanical Engineering Technology

As an engineering technology and STEM education researcher, I have a number of projects that require basic review, and comparisons using a spreadsheet or similar method. The work is basic, but provides us with a better understanding of the differences between STEM students in various fields and in some work comparisons to their colleagues in engineering. The data is already gathered, but help is needed to graph, and review averages, etc. The results of this research will appear in a variety of journal papers, based upon the participation of the undergraduate student they will be given credit for their work in these documents.

Email: aluciett@purdue.edu


Jim Tanoos, Associate Professor of Practice, Polytechnic Statewide

Using data from the PI’s four research studies presented at international conferences in the summer of 2018, undergraduate Purdue University students will provide audio narration to create four distinct Student Narrated Research Studies. The data used for the methodology and results section of these studies comes from annual cross-sectional studies in the US Federal Government Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory. These four Student Narrated Research Studies will be integrated into the PI's four established distance courses so undergraduate students across the state can benefit from learning about data curation and how to retrieve and interpret data to address perplexing current dilemmas. Students register for a 3-credit course during Summer Semester II and the Student Narrated Research Studies will be processed via Purdue’s Video Express technology center to create a comprehensive second-person audio visual learning experience.

Email: jtanoos@purdue.edu


Veterinary Medicine

Maggie O'Haire, Associate Professor of Human-Animal Interaction

Research Assistants will work on projects exploring the effects of service dogs and companion animals on human health outcomes (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder). RAs will work closely with the Project Coordinator, as well as graduate students and other undergraduates. RAs will be responsible for recruiting participants, preparing research materials, tracking participant progress using online data management tools (e.g., REDCap), entering data, and assisting with other tasks as needed. They will also participate in lab meetings and receive additional mentorship from graduate students. We are looking for organized, self-motivated, and dependable undergraduate students to work with our team.

Email: maggie.ohaire@gmail.com

Megan LaFollette, Graduate Research Assistant, Animal Sciences

Laboratory rats are key and common part of the scientific process to develop new medications, learn about behavioral principals, and more. Unfortunately, laboratory rats initially find interacting with humans stressful which can have negative effects on animal welfare, animal handling, and scientific data. The negative effects can be mitigated by a technique called hetero-specific rough-and-tumble play or rat tickling, which mimics natural rat rough-and-tumble play to improve human-animal interactions. My research focuses on identifying and addressing barriers to increased implementation of this technique in the laboratory. The summer project will have the opportunity to assist with this project which may include working with survey data, coding behavior/audio video, and generally assisting with research on laboratory animal welfare in any way needed.

Email: lafollet@purdue.edu

GuangJun Zhang, Hayward Associate Professor of Comparative Pathobiology

College of Veterinary Medicine Our research is focusing on human cancer driver gene discovery and vertebrate embryogenesis using zebrafish models. We use a variety of tools such as CRISPR and transposon-based trans-genesis for our research. Students will not only gain some experiences with modern molecular and cellular biology, but also learn the zebrafish model for studying human diseases.

Email: gjzhang@purdue.edu

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