Team

David Lee Haskins

David Lee Haskins

Post-doctoral scholar

David Lee received his B.S. at Maryville College and earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Georgia. His research experience varies, with his most recent work focused on the accumulation and physiological effects of contaminants (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides) in herpetofauna. David Lee is particularly interested in how anthropogenic contaminants may negatively impact the health (e.g., the immune response) of amphibian and reptiles. He has used a variety of experimental techniques to examine the effects of contaminants in wildlife, including field and lab-based approaches, in vivo and in vitro techniques, and genomic sequence data manipulation and analysis. His current research evaluates both acute and chronic toxic effects of per-/polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) and PFAS-free aquatic film forming foams on a variety of freshwater organisms. Website: https://sites.google.com/view/davidhaskins/home

Andrew Hopkins

Andrew Hopkins

PhD student

Andrew received his bachelor’s from Eckerd College in Florida and Master’s from Western Michigan University. He is interested in studying the impacts of fungicides and other pesticides in long-term, low-dose studies and seeing how they impact growth, development and stress. He is also interested in looking at the interplay between disease and contaminants with a possible focus on Bd.

Melissa Lech

Melissa Lech

Research Technician

Melissa earned her B.S. in Biology from the University of South Carolina Upstate and her M.S. at Purdue University. She is broadly interested in the effects of anthropogenic activities on organisms, especially reptiles and amphibians. Her research focuses on how sublethal exposures to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) affect disease risk.

Matt Hamilton

Matt Hamilton

Laboratory Manager

Matt earned his bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Science from Purdue University in 2012 and his M.S. degree in Wildlife and Forest Resources from the University of Georgia. Matt’s thesis research focused on the effects of long-term stressors, such as contaminants, on the stress response, immune function, and population status of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

Devin Jones

Devin Jones

Post-doctoral scholar

Devin received his B.S. at the University of Pittsburgh and his Ph.D. at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research examined the effects of anthropogenic contaminants (road salts, pesticides, nutrients) on freshwater organisms, populations, and communities using laboratory toxicity tests and outdoor mesocosm experiments. This work also incorporated tools from ecotoxicology with evolutionary theory to investigate how evolved responses to synthetic chemicals arose within amphibians and provides a pathway for inducible chemical tolerance. His current research examines the acute and lasting toxic effects of per-/polyfluorinated alkyl substances on freshwater organisms to identify safer alternatives to aquatic film forming foams. Website (http://devinkjones.wix.com/dkjones)

Maggie Wigren

Maggie Wigren

Research technician

Maggie earned both her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Purdue University in 2016 and 2020, respectively. Her research during her undergrad focused on how competition between a native and invasive Daphnia mediated the effects of a fungal disease, while her graduate research focused on the effects of weathered oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill on the gut microbiome and foraging behavior of the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus). She is interested in continuing to be involved in projects related to aquatic ecotoxicology and disease ecology and is planning to pursue a career in fisheries, environmental consulting, or public outreach