Recent News

How to coronavirus-proof your home

April 1, 2020

Life under coronavirus means staying at home as much as possible — but you’ll likely need to make a trip to the grocery store or pharmacy at some point. Download or print this tip sheet to make sure you don’t bring the virus back home with you.

How to coronavirus-proof your home

Purdue innovators moving to fast-track COVID-19 diagnostic, therapeutic solutions

April 1, 2020

As the coronavirus pandemic spreads across the U.S. and the world, Purdue University scientists are working to move solutions to diagnose and treat the virus to the marketplace as soon as possible.

Purdue innovators moving to fast-track COVID-19 diagnostic, therapeutic solutions

Purdue Prepares for Safer Post-Pandemic Campus

April 1, 2020

What will post-pandemic life look like next fall when students return to campus? Purdue University President Mitch Daniels says “radical changes” or special preparations may be needed for both medical protection and psychological comfort for the campus community.

Purdue Prepares for Safer Post-Pandemic Campus

Purdue Researchers Focused on Coronavirus

April 1, 2020

Amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, Purdue University says it has launched more than 30 research projects and has applied for funding for nearly 20 more.

Purdue Researchers Focused on Coronavirus

With Snakes? From bats to reptiles to humans? Oh my.

April 1, 2020

Much is still unknown about the novel coronavirus, as you know—but experts are gathering more and more interesting info every day about the virus, how it behaves, and where it came from. One surprising tp of investigation? The new coronavirus and snakes.

With Snakes? From bats to reptiles to humans? Oh my.

President Daniels announces launch of Safe Campus Task Force

March 31, 2020

With the viral epidemic still at an early stage in the U.S., uncertainty confronts us on almost every question. But one thing we can say with confidence: next fall’s college environment and experience will be unlike any we have witnessed.

President Daniels announces launch of Safe Campus Task Force

An Astronaut Trainer’s Advice on How to Cope With Isolation

March 31, 2020

If you’re going a little stir crazy after self-isolating during the coronavirus crisis, you’re not alone. Lifehacker looked to an expert in isolation, former NASA consultant D. Marshall Porterfield, who served five years working with astrounauts who had to live in cramped quarters for up to six months at a time. Here are some of Porterfield’s recommendations for coping with isolation:

An Astronaut Trainer’s Advice on How to Cope With Isolation

Creating COVID-19 tests is complicated science, and business

March 30, 2020

The United States faces an ongoing shortage of tests for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Testing availability varies widely by state. And in New York City, the hardest-hit area of the U.S. so far, doctors are only offering tests to people with severe symptoms. The initial test used in the U.S. was created by the federal Centers for Disease Control, and it wasn’t always accurate. It was also only allowed to be used by state-run health departments.

Creating COVID-19 tests is complicated science, and business

Coronavirus: As stay-at-home orders linger, NASA trainer at Purdue tells how astronauts cope: 'Focus on the mission'

March 30, 2020

It was Day 6 Monday of Hoosiers hunkering down to the confined to spaces of their homes, which is not unlike what Purdue professor Marshall Porterfield prepared astronauts for while he worked at NASA.

Coronavirus: As stay-at-home orders linger, NASA trainer at Purdue tells how astronauts cope: 'Focus on the mission'

Creating COVID-19 tests is complicated science, and business

March 30, 2020

The United States faces an ongoing shortage of tests for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Testing availability varies widely by state. And in New York City, the hardest-hit area of the U.S. so far, doctors are only offering tests to people with severe symptoms. The initial test used in the U.S. was created by the federal Centers for Disease Control, and it wasn’t always accurate. It was also only allowed to be used by state-run health departments.

Creating COVID-19 tests is complicated science, and business