Recent News

Electronic merge: Expanded ion beams light new way for next-generation electronic devices, energy storage, smart homes

August 16, 2019

A new type of lens is lighting the way for expanded uses of large ions and building blocks for new materials. The lens may also address one of the fundamental bottlenecks for generating bright ion beams.

Electronic merge: Expanded ion beams light new way for next-generation electronic devices, energy storage, smart homes

Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles displaying Neisserial surface protein A confer protection against virulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in BALB/c mice

August 16, 2019

Purpose: The primary goal of the present study was to explore and evaluate the highly conserved Neisserial surface protein A (NspA) molecule, fused with truncated HBV virus-like particles (VLPs), as a candidate vaccine against the virulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NMB).

Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles displaying Neisserial surface protein A confer protection against virulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in BALB/c mice

Electronic merge: Expanded ion beams light new way for next-generation electronic devices, energy storage, smart homes

August 15, 2019

A new type of lens is lighting the way for expanded uses of large ions and building blocks for new materials. The lens may also address one of the fundamental bottlenecks for generating bright ion beams. A Purdue University analytical chemistry group has developed a new device to help generate intense beams of large ions, which can be used for the fabrication of energy storage devices, optical coatings, purification of proteins and metabolites from complex biological samples, and nanoclusters from reaction mixtures.

Electronic merge: Expanded ion beams light new way for next-generation electronic devices, energy storage, smart homes

Discovery provides path to pathogen-targeted antibiotics

August 15, 2019

"Take with food" is a common warning for people using antibiotics, but a discovery announced this week in the scientific journal Nature may create a path to more targeted drugs. This advice for taking antibiotics is needed because current drugs kill any type of bacteria, including the helpful bacteria in our intestines that help us digest our food. When we take current antibiotics, it can cause digestive distress, and even worse outcomes.

Discovery provides path to pathogen-targeted antibiotics

A HEALTHIER GRANOLA BAR FOR KIDS' LUNCHBOXES

August 15, 2019

Looking for a healthy treat to pack in your kid's lunch? The homemade berry nuts granola bar can be sweet and nutritious at the same time. The main ingredient is oats - a whole grain - meaning it contains the plant's bran, germ and entire grain. "Oats have heart-healthy effects, including its soluble fiber effect on lowering LDL cholesterol and blood glucose," said Connie Weaver, a distinguished professor in the Department of Nutrition Science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. She said oats also contain avenanthramides, a micronutrient with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may protect against aging-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease.

A HEALTHIER GRANOLA BAR FOR KIDS' LUNCHBOXES

Cornell partners with Purdue on global food safety

August 15, 2019

Foodborne illnesses affect 600 million people around the world each year, causing 420,000 deaths. According to the World Health Organization, more than a quarter of these deaths are children younger than 5. Cornell is teaming with Purdue University – a partnership of land-grant universities from New York and Indiana – to establish the first Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety, which aims to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges in agriculture and food insecurity.

Cornell partners with Purdue on global food safety

Purdue leading $10 million effort to address global food safety

August 14, 2019

Purdue University is now home to a lab aimed at increasing awareness and developing environments for food safety around the world. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) awarded nearly $10 million to Purdue to establish the first-ever Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety (FSIL), with the opportunity for up to $20 million in additional funding from USAID for research tailored to specific countries’ needs. Haley Oliver, an associate professor of food science, will direct the lab in collaboration with Cornell University. Scientists will develop programs to improve food safety in Bangladesh, Kenya, Ethiopia, Senegal and Cambodia.

Purdue leading $10 million effort to address global food safety

The power of 4D technology advances care for heart patients

August 14, 2019

A tool that has been around for decades shows new promise in helping people with heart disease. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that adding ultrasound imaging during the doctor’s assessment of cardiac function could help improve diagnoses and treatments. These findings come while Purdue University heart imaging researchers are also developing novel strategies to study cardiovascular disease with 4D ultrasound – using 3D space and time. While recent advancements have made 4D ultrasound available to the clinic, the information extracted for patient care remains similar to that provided by its conventional usage as a 2D imaging technique.

The power of 4D technology advances care for heart patients

Plant cell packs: a scalable platform for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering

August 7, 2019

Industrial plant biotechnology applications include the production of sustainable fuels, complex metabolites and recombinant proteins, but process development can be impaired by a lack of reliable and scalable screening methods. Here, we describe a rapid and versatile expression system which involves the infusion of Agrobacterium tumefaciens into three?dimensional, porous plant cell aggregates deprived of cultivation medium, which we have termed plant cell packs (PCPs). This approach is compatible with different plant species such as Nicotiana tabacum BY2, Nicotiana benthamiana or Daucus carota and 10?times more effective than transient expression in liquid plant cell culture. We found that the expression of several proteins was similar in PCPs and intact plants, for example, 47 and 55 mg/kg for antibody 2G12 expressed in BY2 PCPs and N. tabacum plants respectively.

Plant cell packs: a scalable platform for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering

GRABIT Challenge Award Recipients Announced

August 7, 2019

Center for Produce Safety (CPS) has awarded three groundbreaking solutions-directed concepts to develop tools that can help growers identify and evaluate food safety risks posed by proximity to domesticated animal agriculture in the real world, in real time. CPS awarded a total of $135,000 in innovation challenge awards to three teams of scientists. The center’s inaugural challenge called for “Growers’ Risk Assessment Biomarker Investigative Tools” (GRABIT) to help growers identify and evaluate pre-harvest risks posed by potential transfer of contamination biomarkers, focused primarily on airborne transport, from animal feeding operations. Receiving their GRABIT grant awards at CPS’s 2019 Research Symposium in Austin, Texas from board chair Dave Corsi and technical committee chair Drew McDonald were (pictured left to right): Dr. Mohit Verma, Purdue University – $30,000 award; Jim Byron, Nano Reagents, LLC – $75,000 award, and Luxin Wang, University of California, Davis – $30,000 award.

GRABIT Challenge Award Recipients Announced