Recent News

'A real advance in the care of strokes...' Purdue professor develops promising treatment

June 24, 2022

A Purdue University associate professor has created a new treatment for strokes that has proven to be 86% effective in animal models. This treatment utilizes a magnetically controlled "microrobot-enabled self-clearing catheter" that removes blood accumulating in the brain during a stroke, according to a release from Purdue. Hyowon "Hugh" Lee is an associate professor from the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering. His innovation was tested on "porcine models of hemorrhage" in collaboration with neurosurgeons Timothy Bentley from Purdue's College of Veterinary Medicine and Albert Lee from Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine in Carmel.

'A real advance in the care of strokes...' Purdue professor develops promising treatment

Climate change is increasing risk for heartworm, researchers say. How to protect your pet

June 21, 2022

Climate change could be contributing to the spread of heartworm in the U.S., creating conditions ripe for the transmitters of the parasite, mosquitoes, to breed. A 2019 USA TODAY article cited data showing that heartworm infections in the number of dogs per veterinary clinic testing positive rose by 21.7% from 2013 to 2016. In addition, a study in Hungary published in 2020 found both an expanded geographical area and increased incidence of heartworm infection since 2012, which researchers concluded was due to climate change and ecological changes. While the study was based in Europe, researchers believe the same heartworm emergence and spread could also be observed in North America. Scrub Hub: Is there a good turf grass replacement that’s dog-friendly and low- or no-mow? Moreover, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration is predicting increased odds of above-normal temperatures for most of the U.S. for June, July and August of 2022. Luckily, preventive treatments are almost 100% effective at preventing heartworm, according to the American Heartworm Society. Here's what pet owners should know heading into summer. What is heartworm, and what causes it? Heartworm is a parasite that causes a pulmonary disease in pets like dogs, cats and ferrets. It's also present in other wildlife, like wolves, coyotes, and sea lions, Dr. Sriveny Dangoudoubiyam, an assistant professor of parasitology at Purdue's College of Veterinary Medicine, said.

Climate change is increasing risk for heartworm, researchers say. How to protect your pet

Purdue Expert Says ‘Smart’ Roads Can Help Motorists and the Environment

June 18, 2022

Luna Lu at the Lyles School of Civil Engineering and director of the Center for Intelligent Infrastructure at Purdue is an expert in innovating concrete to improve roads. She says fewer repairs would mean fewer construction delays, also noting that ‘smarter’ roads could be better for the environment.

Purdue Expert Says ‘Smart’ Roads Can Help Motorists and the Environment

PVM involved in Research on Microrobot Device that Removes Brain Hemorrhages Due to Strokes or Aneurysms

June 17, 2022

A new treatment for strokes caused by bleeding in the brain that uses a magnetically controlled microrobot-enabled self-clearing catheter has been shown to be 86% effective in animal models, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. The research led by Dr. Hyowon “Hugh” Lee, associate professor of biomedical engineering in Purdue’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, involves collaboration with neurosurgeons in veterinary and human medicine.

PVM involved in Research on Microrobot Device that Removes Brain Hemorrhages Due to Strokes or Aneurysms

Picnic Brings Together Summer Research Scholars and Mentors to Kick-off Summer Program

June 17, 2022

The start of summer means the opportunity for undergraduate and veterinary students to gain first-hand experience working in research laboratories courtesy of the College of Veterinary Medicine’s annual Veterinary Research Scholars Summer Program. This year’s program kicked-off the evening of June 2 with a traditional Indiana picnic, hosted by the college’s Office of Research, at Happy Hollow Park in West Lafayette. A key element of the program is pairing the participants with faculty mentors. Working with their mentor, each participant designs and conducts a summer research project. Additionally, there are opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities, as well as a research poster session where the students are able to share their summer research project with the college’s faculty and staff. Dr. Harm Hogenesch, Purdue Veterinary Medicine associate dean for research and professor of immunopathology, and Dr. Eli Asem, professor of physiology in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, organize the program by matching students and faculty.

Picnic Brings Together Summer Research Scholars and Mentors to Kick-off Summer Program

Microrobot Device Removes Brain Hemorrhages Due to Strokes, Aneurysms

June 17, 2022

A new treatment for strokes caused by bleeding in the brain that uses a magnetically controlled microrobot-enabled self-clearing catheter has been shown to be 86% effective in animal models, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. Hyowon "Hugh" Lee, a Purdue University associate professor, created the magnetically controlled microdevice that removes blood accumulating in the brain during a stroke. The innovation was tested on porcine models of hemorrhage in collaboration with neurosurgeons Timothy Bentley and Albert Lee from Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine in Carmel, Indiana.

Microrobot Device Removes Brain Hemorrhages Due to Strokes, Aneurysms

Scientists create microrobot that can clear blood clots in the brain

June 16, 2022

Scientists at Purdue University have created a device that cleans the blood that accumulates in the brain during a stroke. With 86% efficiency in animal models, the new technology is composed of a self-cleaning catheter that works through a magnetically controlled microrobot. The tests were carried out on a swine guinea pig, in collaboration with neurosurgeons from universities and neurology institutes in the United States. A study reporting the achievements was published in January of this year in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

Scientists create microrobot that can clear blood clots in the brain

THE LATEST IN HEALTHCARE INNOVATION? TINY ROBOTS

June 16, 2022

Researchers at both Stanford University and Purdue University have recently published studies on the use of miniaturized robots inserted into the body to treat certain health concerns. The robots could be used to delivered timed doses of medicine, chart the course of a tumor or disease, or even remove obstructions such as blood clots. At Purdue, "microbots" developed by Hyowon "Hugh" Lee, an associate professor from the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, have been used to remove blood accumulating around the brain after a stroke. Working with neurosurgeons Timothy Bentley, MD, of Purdue's College of Veterinary Medicine, and Albert Lee, MD, from Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine in Carmel, Indiana, he successfully removed pooled blood in six of seven animals.

THE LATEST IN HEALTHCARE INNOVATION? TINY ROBOTS

Microrobot device removes brain hemorrhages due to strokes or aneurysms

June 15, 2022

A new treatment for strokes caused by bleeding in the brain that uses a magnetically controlled microrobot-enabled self-clearing catheter has been shown to be 86% effective in animal models, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. Hyowon "Hugh" Lee, a Purdue University associate professor from the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, created the magnetically controlled microdevice that removes blood accumulating in the brain during a stroke

Microrobot device removes brain hemorrhages due to strokes or aneurysms

Microrobot device removes brain hemorrhages due to strokes or aneurysms

June 15, 2022

A new treatment for strokes caused by bleeding in the brain that uses a magnetically controlled microrobot-enabled self-clearing catheter has been shown to be 86% effective in animal models, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. Hyowon "Hugh" Lee, a Purdue University associate professor from the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, created the magnetically controlled microdevice that removes blood accumulating in the brain during a stroke.

Microrobot device removes brain hemorrhages due to strokes or aneurysms