Recent News

High-temperature electronics? That’s hot

December 7, 2018

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — From iPhones on Earth to rovers on Mars, most electronics only function within a certain temperature range. By blending two organic materials together, researchers at Purdue University could create electronics that withstand extreme heat. This new plastic material could reliably conduct electricity in up to 220 degrees Celsius (428 F), according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Science. “Commercial electronics operate between minus 40 and 85 degrees Celsius. Beyond this range, they’re going to malfunction,” said Jianguo Mei, an assistant professor of organic chemistry at Purdue University. “We created a material that can operate at high temperatures by blending two polymers together.”

High-temperature electronics? That’s hot

Purdue trustees approve posthumous degrees and academic name changes, ratify distinguished faculty

December 7, 2018

Congratulations Dr. Ben-Amotz. The Purdue University Board of Trustees on Friday (Dec. 7) awarded two posthumous degrees and ratified two distinguished faculty positions, in addition to approving the renaming of an academic unit on the West Lafayette campus and an undergraduate program on the Fort Wayne campus. Trustees also issued resolutions of appreciation for a key leader of the creation of Purdue Global and friends of the university, including two whose names will be added to campus facilities.

Purdue trustees approve posthumous degrees and academic name changes, ratify distinguished faculty

Insider attacks: Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases

December 7, 2018

Living with an autoimmune disease can feel like an insider is attacking your body. An estimated 24 million people in the United States are affected by autoimmune diseases, a group of diseases in which the person’s immune system attacks part of the person’s own body.

Insider attacks: Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases

Search Launched for Discovery Park Fellow

December 6, 2018

Discovery Park has launched a search for a Discovery Park Fellow. The fellow will work closely with Purdue's vice president for Discovery Park and Discovery Park center directors and administration team on the area's priorities and ongoing academic and research activities.

Search Launched for Discovery Park Fellow

High-temperature electronics? That’s hot

December 6, 2018

A new organic plastic allows electronics to function in extreme temperatures without sacrificing performance.

High-temperature electronics? That’s hot

Yin and yang: Opposites in nature, fluoride and lithium, compete for higher-energy batteries

December 6, 2018

The chemical element that makes up most of today's batteries, lithium, may soon be challenged by its polar opposite on the periodic table: fluoride. Yes, the same stuff in toothpaste. The two elements would be in competition for helping electronics last longer on a charge, such as electric cars that need to travel more miles than is possible with lithium-ion batteries on the market. Researchers are one step closer to equipping fluoride-based batteries for battle with improvements that allow the technology to operate at room temperature. Up until this point, fluoride had been limited to building high-temperature batteries that are impractical for our electronic devices.

Yin and yang: Opposites in nature, fluoride and lithium, compete for higher-energy batteries

Insider attacks: Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases

December 6, 2018

Living with an autoimmune disease can feel like an insider is attacking your body. An estimated 24 million people in the United States are affected by autoimmune diseases, a group of diseases in which the person’s immune system attacks part of the person’s own body.

Insider attacks: Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases

World War II weapon used in new battle: Combating Parkinson's disease

December 6, 2018

A World War II chemical weapon antidote is shown to be effective combating a new enemy: Parkinson’s disease.

World War II weapon used in new battle: Combating Parkinson's disease

World War II weapon used in new battle: combatting Parkinson's disease

December 5, 2018

Purdue University’s Riyi Shi, a Purdue professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering, shows the A World War II chemical weapon antidote can effectively remove acrolein, a neurotoxin produced in the body that is directly correlated with Parkinson’s disease.

World War II weapon used in new battle: combatting Parkinson's disease

Beautiful bodies: Purdue research aims to solve a sticky situation for beauty products, salons

December 5, 2018

A Purdue University professor’s underwater explorations are leading to discoveries that may soon make popular holiday beauty gifts much safer. Jonathan Wilker’s team has developed a unique, toxin-free adhesive system that could be used on bones, teeth, artificial fingernails and eyelash extensions.

Beautiful bodies: Purdue research aims to solve a sticky situation for beauty products, salons

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