Native American Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month is a national month-long celebration created to recognize, honor and celebrate Indigenous Peoples. The NAECC serves as the focal point for campus and community events and sponsors an array of cultural presentations featuring traditional and contemporary Native American scholars, art demonstrations, educational tours, workshops and documentaries.

In 1990 President George H. W. Bush was the first U.S. president to recognize Native American Heritage Month in November and, to this day, U.S. presidents continue with this tradition. President Barak Obama released his Presidential Proclamation in October 2010 stating in part:

For millennia before Europeans settled in North America, the indigenous peoples of this continent flourished with vibrant cultures and were the original stewards of the land. From generation to generation, they handed down invaluable cultural knowledge and rich traditions, which continue to thrive in Native American communities across our country today. During Native American Heritage Month, we honor and celebrate their importance to our great Nation and our world.

President Barak Obama's Proclamation - National Native American Heritage Month 2010


Native American Heritage Month - November 2018

 

NAECC Film Screening, "NATIVE AMERICA"
Tuesday, October 23, 6:00 - 7:30 pm, NAECC - Episode 1 "From Caves to Cosmos"
Tuesday, October 30, 6:00 - 7:30 pm, PFEN 241 - Episode 2 "Nature to Nations"

A new four-part series from Providence Pictures premieres on PBS. Weaving history and science with living Indigenous traditions, the series brings to life a land of massive cities connected by social networks spanning two continents, with unique and sophisticated systems of science, art, and writing. Made with the active participation of Native American communities and filmed in some of the most spectacular locations in the hemisphere, NATIVE AMERICA illuminates the splendor of a past whose story has for too long remained untold.

Episode 1 “From Caves to Cosmos”: Combine ancient wisdom and modern science to answer a 15,000-year-old question: who were America’s First People? The answer hides in Amazonian cave paintings, Mexican burial chambers, New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon and waves off California’s coast. Co-sponsored with CILMAR.
Episode 2 “Nature to Nations”: Explore the rise of great American nations, from monarchies to democracies. Investigate lost cities in Mexico, a temple in Peru, a potlatch ceremony in the Pacific Northwest and a tapestry of shell beads in upstate New York whose story inspired our own democracy. Co-sponsored with Office of Multicultural Program, College of Ag and Diversity Action Committee in Agriculture (DATA).


Native American Heritage Month Opening Celebration

Thursday, November 1, 4:00 - 5:30 pm, STEW 278
Join us as we launch Native American Heritage Month events with the dance performance by Dana Warrington. An award-winning artist and champion traditional dancer, he will share stories and history from both his Menominee Tribe in Wisconsin and Prairie Band of Potawatomi of Kansas. Warrington is the featured artist for the fall 2018 Eiteljorg Museum’s Artist-in-Residence program. Sponsored by NAECC in collaboration with the Eiteljorg Museum.


Native American Indian Days at the State Capito
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Friday, November 2, 9:30 am - 2:00 pm, Indiana State Capitol, Indianapolis


NAECC Film Screening, "NATIVE AMERICA"
Tuesday, November 6, 6:00 - 7:30 pm, PRCE 277 - Episode 3 “Cities of the Sky” 
Tuesday, November 13, 6:00 - 7:30 pm, Third Street Suites Conference Room - Episode 4 “New World Rising”

A new four-part series from Providence Pictures premieres on PBS. Weaving history and science with living Indigenous traditions, the series brings to life a land of massive cities connected by social networks spanning two continents, with unique and sophisticated systems of science, art, and writing. Made with the active participation of Native American communities and filmed in some of the most spectacular locations in the hemisphere, NATIVE AMERICA illuminates the splendor of a past whose story has for too long remained untold. 

Episode 3 “Cities of the Sky”: Discover the cosmological secrets behind America’s ancient cities. Scientists explore some of the world’s largest pyramids and 3D-scan a lost city of monumental mounds on the Mississippi River, native elders reveal ancient powers of the sky. Co-sponsored with Polytechnic Institute Office of Recruitment, Retention, and Diversity and Science Diversity Office.
Episode 4 “New World Rising”: Discover how resistance, survival and revival are revealed through an empire of horse-mounted Comanche warriors, secret messages encoded in an Aztec manuscript and a grass bridge in the Andes that span mountains and centuries. 


Lunch and Learn:  Tol Foster 
(Mvskoke Creek)
Thursday, November 8, Noon - 1:00 pm, NAECC
“Tribal Futures - Nightmare or Rebirth?: The Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Imagines 2028” 
Sponsored by NAECC and Civic Engagement and Leadership Development

NAECC Craft Circle with Linda Andrews (Miami/Cherokee decent)
Thursday, November 15, 3:00 - 5:00 pm
Take part in this interactive arts and craft session. Learn about gourds and how they are used in everyday life and in art with local Native artist Linda Andrews. Bring your creative energy for this stress reduction event and create two projects. Reservations required at Eventbrite.


NAECC Indigenous Alumni Speakers Series presents RaeLynn Butler
Thursday, November 27, 3:00 - 4:30 pm, NAECC
This speaker series features distinguished Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Purdue alumni who are making outstanding contributions in Native American communities and accomplishments in their profession. RaeLynn Butler is from the Muscogee Creek Nation in Tulsa, Oklahoma, she received her bachelor’s degree from Haskell Indian Nations University and her master’s degree in Botany from the Botany and Plant Pathology Department, College of Agriculture. She currently serves as the Manager of the Historic and Cultural Preservation Department with the Muscogee Creek Nation. Sponsored by NAECC, in collaboration with SIGP Program.


MESA 15th Annual Multicultural Gathering, “Mother Earth & Father Sky: Environmental Justice, Food Security and Sexual Violence Prevention”

Wednesday, November 28, Hendricks County Fairgrounds, Danville, IN
One-day training focused on developing strategies for sexual violence prevention in underserved and underrepresented communities.  Sponsored in collaboration with MESA

Purdue University’s Visiting Writers Reading Series presents Natalie Diaz (Mojave/Gila River)
Thursday, November 29,  7:30 pm,  Krannert Auditorium
Natalie Diaz was born and raised in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Her first poetry collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press. She is a MacArthur Fellow, a Lannan Literary Fellow, and a Native Arts Council Foundation Artist Fellow. She was awarded a Bread Loaf Fellowship, the Holmes National Poetry Prize, a Hodder Fellowship, a PEN/Civitella Ranieri Foundation Residency, as well as being awarded a US Artists Ford Fellowship. She teaches at the Arizona State University Creative Writing MFA program. Co-sponsor with Creative Writing Department, College of Liberal Arts


3rd Annual Native American Winter Art Market

Saturday, December 1,  Noon - 4:00 pm, NAECC
Join us for an afternoon with Native American students and local artists who will showcase their jewelry and artwork.  


2018 NAHM Event Flyer

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