Kathryn Jacobson

Kathryn Jacobson Profile Picture
IGP:
Life Sciences

Mentor / Lab:
Dr. Sarah Calve

Specific Research Area / Project:
Proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix dynamics during mouse forelimb development

Undergraduate Institution:
College of Saint Benedict, Minnesota


Research Profile:

Tissue engineers aim to restore damaged tissues by creating scaffolds that promote cellular adhesion, proliferation and eventual differentiation into functional tissue. It is known that the chemical and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulate cellular behavior; however, current scaffolds often mimic the ECM of adult, homeostatic tissue and frequently lead to poor tissue restoration. What is rarely taken into consideration is that the ECM undergoes extensive remodeling during development to facilitate growth. The regulatory roles of these changes on cellular behavior are largely unknown due to the lack of knowledge regarding ECM composition. The objective of my project is to determine the protein abundance, maturation, and dynamics of ECM proteins as a function of development in the mouse musculoskeletal system. Overall, my findings indicate that the matrisome dynamically changes during tissue development. Future studies will focus on quantifying matrisome turnover in vivo to resolve individual protein function during the development of muscle, tendon, and bone. Ultimately, these studies will reveal important changes in the matrisome during development and provide tissue engineers with directed criteria to design scaffolds that fully restore damaged tissues.


About Me:

Kathryn Jacobson About Me Picture

During my undergraduate career, I was trained as a physicist and mathematician; I loved the attention to detail and critical thinking skills that I learned through the classes and research. I always knew I wanted to do graduate level research, but high energy particle physics or theoretical mathematics did not appeal to me as much as biology or chemistry research. Being in a life sciences interdisciplinary graduate program has given me the chance to be a biochemist and a developmental biologist, while keeping my roots through engineering and biotechnology. I have always believed that health-driven research can only go so far in a single discipline, and learning to work across multiple disciplines is what drives cutting-edge research to push boundaries and make strides. Purdue's PULSe program has given me the opportunity to have the best of all worlds, which is more than I could ever ask for - Go Boilers!

Presentations:

  • Jacobson, KJ; Ocken, AR; Miller, AF; Kinzer-Ursem, TL; Calve, S; Proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix dynamics during mouse forelimb development. Presented as an oral at the American Society of Matrix Biology; Las Vegas, Nevada (October 2018).
  • Jacobson, KJ; Ocken, AR; Miller, AF; Kinzer-Ursem, TL; Calve, S; Proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix dynamics during mouse forelimb development. Presented as a poster at the American Society of Matrix Biology; Las Vegas, Nevada (October 2018).
  • Jacobson, KJ; Ocken, AR; Calve, S; Dynamic proteomic analysis of the developing extracellular matrix. Presented as a poster at the BME-PI4D-IBSc Research Symposium; Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (April, 2018).
  • Jacobson, KJ; Calve, S; Dynamic proteomic analysis of the developing extracellular matrix. Presented as an oral during the PULSe 5 Minute Thesis Competition; Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (January 2018).
  • Jacobson, KJ; Ocken, AR; Kinzer-Ursem, TL; Calve, S; Characterizing extracellular matrix proteome dynamics during murine fetal development. Presented as a poster at the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs Spring Reception; Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (May 2017).
  • Jacobson, KJ; Nolte, DD; Observing biodynamics using long-coherence optical back-scattering patterns. Presented as a poster at the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs Spring Reception; Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (May, 2016).
  • Jacobson,KJ; Nolte, DD; Observing biodynamics using long-coherence optical back-scattering patterns. Presented as a poster at the PULSe Spring Reception; Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (April, 2016)

Leadership:

  • PULSe Graduate Student Organization (GSO) President (AY 2018-19)
  • PULSe GSO First Year Mentoring Program Coordinator (AY 2018-19)
  • PULSe GSO Student Activities Coordinator (AYs 2016-17, 2017-18)
  • PULSe GSO Science in Schools (SiS) Spring Fest Co-chair (AYs 2016-17, 2017-18)
  • Volunteer for SiS Science Day/Night (2015-2019)
  • Participant in PULSe GSO First Year Mentoring Program (2016, 2018)
  • Participant in Women in Science events (2015-2018)

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