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Marion Underwood

Marion K. Underwood

Email: underwm@purdue.edu
Download Marion Underwood’s Curriculum Vitae

As of August 1, 2018, Marion Underwood is now at Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Indiana, where she serves as the Dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences.

Underwood’s research focuses on how children develop peer relationships. Her work investigates the developmental origins of socially aggressive behavior and the associated outcomes for victims as well as aggressors. Her longitudinal study of children’s relationships and social development follows the same group of students from third grade through high school. As the students in her study grew up, it became clear that electronic communication had become an enormous part of their social lives. Underwood adapted her study to capture this important aspect of the students’ social development. In the eighth grade, these students were given BlackBerry phones, enabling the research team to analyze electronic communication and learn more about evolving relationships among young people.

The overall aim of this research program is to clarify developmental precursors of adolescent psychopathology for both girls and boys, with the long-term goal of developing prevention efforts not only for social and physical aggression, but also for internalizing problems, personality disorders and eating disorders. In 2001, Underwood was awarded the Chancellor’s Council Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award. She has authored many journal articles and two books: Social Aggression Among Girls and Social Development: Relationships in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence (with Lisa Rosen).

Underwood was awarded fellow status by the Association for Psychological Science, an honor given to prominent psychologists who have made sustained, outstanding contributions to the science of psychology in such areas as research, teaching, service and application. She received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Wellesley College. She earned master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from Duke University. Underwood joined Reed College in 1991 and transitioned to UT Dallas in 1998.


Current Research Team


Doctoral Students

Allycen Kurup

Allycen Kurup

Allycen is a clinical psychology doctoral student at Purdue University. She joined the lab at UT Dallas during the Summer 2017 semester, and made the move with Dr. Underwood to Purdue in Summer 2018. She received her BS in psychology from the University of Washington, in Seattle, Washington. During her undergraduate career, she studied children's implicit and explicit attitudes of race and gender, and spent some time in her post-baccalaureate years working in a community-based study of early detection and intervention for autism. Allycen's current research interests focus on the ways in which adolescents and emerging adults explore their gender and sexuality via digital communication, and how these behaviors relate to social and mental health. In the future, she hopes to work with LGBTQ+ youth to promote healthy identity development and support online and offline.


Undergraduate and Post-Bac RA's

Sarah Bostic

Sarah Bostic

Sarah Bostic is a senior majoring in psychology and minoring in public health at the University of Texas at Dallas. She joined the Blackberry project in Spring 2018. After her graduation from UT Dallas, she plans on continuing her education by pursuing a PhD program in clinical psychology. She is interested in psychological disorders and counseling for young adults, as well as social motivation, self-compassion, and mindfulness.

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Stephanie Cao

Stephanie Cao is a senior neuroscience major with a minor in criminology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She joined the Blackberry Project team as a research assistant in Spring 2018 and has been coding since. After graduation, Stephanie plans on continuing her education in graduate school to further her interest in forensic pathology. She is especially interested in behavioral neurological disorders and their role in the development of antisocial behaviors in adolescence.

Emily Davis

Emily Davis

Emily Davis is a senior majoring in Health Sciences Pre-Professional with minors in Biology and Psychology at Purdue University. She joined the BlackBerry Project in January 2019. Emily hopes to attend medical school after graduation, with aspirations of becoming a surgeon. Her research interests include how neurological disorders and diseases manifest in the brain, and ways to innovate treatment and prevention.

Sydney Runner

Sydney Runner

Sydney Runner is a senior majoring in psychology with a double minor in forensics and law and society at Purdue University. She joined the project in May 2020. Sydney plans on becoming a criminal profiler for the FBI as her career. Her research interests mostly include mental illness, specifically schizophrenia, and its possible treatments.

Hailey Szadowski

Hailey Szadowski

Hailey Szadowski is a junior majoring in Biological Engineering and minoring in Biotechnology at Purdue Univesrity. She joined the Blackberry Project team in Summer 2020. After graduating from Purdue, Hailey plans to attend graduate school to continue her studies within biology. She is interested in pursuing a future career in biology research.

Mairead Willis

Mairéad Willis

Mairéad Willis holds a BA in Neuroscience and Behavior from the University of Notre Dame and an MA in Creative Writing from the National University of Ireland, Cork. While at Notre Dame, she spent two years assisting with research on the effects of induced stress on cognitive performance. Her interest in best practices in psychological research led her to pursue the position she currently holds as a research coordinator for an NIH grant in quantitative psychology. Mairéad joined the Blackberry Project Lab in January 2020. Her research interests include the prevention of mood disorders in adolescent populations, development of novel treatments for mood disorders, and best practices for experimental design and data analysis.

Faiza Zaman

Faiza Zaman

Faiza Zaman is a senior majoring in psychology. She joined the BlackBerry Project in Spring 2018. She has a variety of interests regarding the field of psychology and has plans to open her own psychology business in the future. Once she graduates, she plans to go to either medical school or graduate school. She particularly enjoys working with children and desires to learn and understand how psychological disorders affect people as a whole.


Past Research Team


Co-Investigators

Robert Ackerman

Robert A. Ackerman

Email: raa110030@utdallas.edu
Dr. Ackerman’s profile on the BBS site
Download Robert Ackerman’s Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Ackerman is an Associate Professor of Psychology in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at The University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Ackerman’s research program investigates how the quality of interpersonal relationships (e.g., roommate relationships, romantic relationships) is impacted by the characteristics of the individuals that comprise them. He received his PhD in social and personality psychology from Michigan State University in 2011, and he began his appointment as an assistant professor at The University of Texas at Dallas in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences in August of 2011. Because Dr. Ackerman’s substantive interests involve processes that occur within relationships and therefore often involve non-independent data, he is particularly interested in analytic models for both cross-sectional (e.g., Ackerman, Kashy, & Corretti, 2015) and longitudinal dyadic data (e.g., Ackerman, Donnellan, Kashy, & Conger, 2012).

Kurt Beron

Kurt Beron

Email: kberon@utdallas.edu
Visit Dr. Beron's website
Download Dr. Beron's Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Beron is a professor in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (previously, Social Sciences) and teaches in Economics and in Public Policy at The University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Beron’s research is in cross-disciplinary applications of quantitative methodology. He has worked on projects spanning economics, education, sociology, and, most recently, psychology, and his research has often focused on public policy issues. Dr. Beron’s current research agenda focuses on the human capital development of children and young adults and their effects on later outcomes, but emphasizes the traditionally non-economic factors that affect this development. His empirical work seeks the understanding of situations that involve unobservable and latent variables using econometric and statistical techniques such as qualitative and limited dependent variable models, structural equation modeling and multilevel modeling.


Past Post-Doctoral Research Fellows

Madeleine George

Madeleine George

Madeleine George is a former post-doctoral fellow whose research focused on how adolescents’ and young adults’ usage of digital technologies was related to their wellbeing. She currently works with RTI International in their Center for Advanced Methods Development. Email: mgeorge@rti.org or madeleine.j.george@gmail.com.

Justin Vollet

Justin Vollet

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
University of Texas of the Permian Basin

Samuel Ehrenreich

Samuel E. Ehrenreich

Assistant Professor
Human Development and Family Studies
University of Nevada, Reno
https://www.unr.edu/education/faculty-and-staff/human-development-and-family-studies/sam-ehrenreich

Diana Meter

Diana J. Meter

Assistant Professor
Human Development and Family Studies
Utah State University
http://hdfs.usu.edu/people/faculty/meter-diana


Past Doctoral Students

Kaitlyn Burnell

Kaitlyn Burnell

Kaitlyn Burnell is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She received her PhD from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2020, her MS from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2019, and her BA at Western Connecticut State University in 2015. Kaitlyn’s work examines how classic developmental and social psychological theories apply to young people’s digital technology use. Specifically, she is interested in young people’s social comparison and self-presentation tendencies on social networking sites, and how these tendencies relate to their psychosocial adjustment. She is also interested in examining how individual differences may moderate the effects of social networking site use. Kaitlyn primarily uses observational methods in her research, such as by coding text messages and social networking site information for content. Email: Kaitlyn.burnell@duke.edu


Past Undergraduate and Master's RAs

Iman Abdelgawad

Iman Abdelgawad

Daniel Canales

Daniel Canales

Kayla Caouette

Kayla Caouette

Christy Chang

Christy Chang

Alex Carillo

Alejandro (Alex) Carillo

Natashaa Dalal

Natashaa Dalal

Sesha Dasari

Sesha Dasari

Madeline Do

Madeline Do

Cassandra Fritsche

Cassandra Fritsche

Chelsea Gross

Chelsea Gross

Nisha Gupta

Nisha Gupta

Areefa Hingora

Areefa Hingora

Rehan Khan

Rehan Khan

Sahana Kodali

Sahana Kodali

Elle Lee

Elle Lee

Audra Miller

Audra Miller

Josephine Nguyen

Josephine Nguyen

Roseline Ong

Jing Tong (Roseline) Ong

Aashka Patel

Aashka Patel

Miriam Percival

Miriam Percival

Merin Prince

Merin Prince

Taylor Sites

Taylor Sites

Mathi Siva

Mathi Siva

Maria Sosa

Maria Sosa

Jennifer Torres

Jennifer Torres

Rashmi Venkatesh

Rashmi Venkatesh

Era Fabiha Yousuf

Era Fabiha Yousuf