Expected Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the core curriculum are divided into two categories: foundational and embedded. All undergraduate students must meet the foundational learning outcomes, which are the same for all students, regardless of discipline or major. Embedded learning outcomes are included in the core requirements of particular degrees or plans of study and are addressed within courses or activities identified within a specific discipline.

  • Requirement: One Course -- clear expression of ideas in writing; includes grammar, organization, and structure. Varying levels and types of writing skills are required for different jobs. The ability to convey ideas concisely and coherently is important.
  • Key Skills:
    • Demonstrates understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned task(s) and focuses on all elements of the work.
    • Uses appropriate and relevant content to explore ideas and/or demonstrate mastery of the subject, conveying the writer’s understanding, and shaping the work.
    • Demonstrates attention to and successful execution of organization, content, presentation, format and stylistic choices in writing.
    • Demonstrates use of credible, relevant resources to support ideas that are situated within the discipline and genre of writing.
    • Uses language that effectively communicates meaning to readers with clarity and fluency.
  • Requirement: One course -- information literacy is the ability to recognize the extent and nature of information need, then to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the needed information. It involves designing, evaluating and implementing a strategy to answer questions or achieve a desired goal.
  • Key Skills:
    • Determine the extent of information needed (define the research question, determine key concepts and types of information needed)
    • Access information using effective, well-designed search strategies and relevant information sources.
    • Evaluate information and its sources critically (analyzes assumptions and evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position)
    • Communicate, organize and synthesize information from several sources.
    • Access and use information ethically and legally (citations and references; paraphrasing, summary, or quoting; distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution)
    • Propose a solution/hypothesis that indicates comprehension of the problem and is sensitive to contextual factors as well as the ethical, logical, or cultural dimensions of the problem.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published, confidential, and/or proprietary information.
  • Requirement: One course -- activity of conveying meaningful information verbally; communication by word of mouth typically relies on words, visual aids and non-verbal elements to support the conveyance of the meaning. Oral communication is designed to increase knowledge, foster understanding, or to promote change in the listener’s attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.
  • Key Skills:
    • Uses appropriate organizational patterns (introduction, conclusion, sequenced material, transitions) that is clearly and consistently observable when making presentations
    • Uses language that is thoughtful and generally supports the effectiveness of the presentation (and is appropriate to the audience).
    • Uses appropriate delivery techniques when making a presentation (posture, gesture, eye contact, vocal expression)
    • Effectively uses supporting materials in presentations (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations)
    • Clearly communicates a central message with the supporting materials
  • Requirement: Two courses -- the ability to understand and apply basic scientific, quantitative, and technological content knowledge.
  • Key Skills:
    • Science: think and function as a scientist by using critical thinking and analytical inquiry; apply basic scientific, quantitative, and technological methods and knowledge of nature to the solution of scientific problems; use the scientific method and theories to analyze questions in the physical and natural world; provide scientific explanations of the nature of the universe, the earth, and/or life forms and be able to distinguish these explanations from non-scientific explanations
  • Requirement: One course -- the ability to understand and apply basic scientific, quantitative, and technological content knowledge.
  • Key Skills:
    • Science, Technology and Society: Understand and reflect upon the complex issues raised by technological and scientific changes and its effects on society and the global world by making sense of, evaluating, and responding to present and future changes that shape individuals’ work, public, and personal lives. Courses meeting this content area may focus on issues such as global warming; biotechnology; GMO foods; and computing and information science as it relates to security, privacy, and the proliferation of global information. Consideration should be given to scientific and technological changes from fields such as agriculture, computer science, engineering, education, health sciences, etc.
  • Requirement: One course -- the ability to understand and apply basic scientific, quantitative, and technological content knowledge.
  • Key Skills:
    • College Algebra: Students must pass this content area or earn a score of 75 or higher on a proctored ALEKS exam..
  • Requirement: One course -- The ability to recognize one’s own cultural traditions and to understand and appreciate other cultural traditions and languages.
  • Key Skills:
    • Discuss history and the basic principles and operation of government with a view to being a responsible citizen; discuss economic, social, and cultural diversity within a global context; describe the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence individuals and groups; explain the perspective of the culture of another country through the study of world languages, arts, spiritual traditions, mythology/literature, and/or through study abroad.
    • Humanities: Includes content in classics, history, languages, the law, literature, the performing arts, philosophy (including ethics), religion, and visual arts.
  • Requirement: One course -- The ability to recognize one’s own cultural traditions and to understand and appreciate other cultural traditions and languages.
  • Key Skills:
    • Discuss history and the basic principles and operation of government with a view to being a responsible citizen; discuss economic, social, and cultural diversity within a global context; describe the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence individuals and groups; explain the perspective of the culture of another country through the study of world languages, arts, spiritual traditions, mythology/literature, and/or through study abroad.
    • Behavioral/Social Sciences: Includes content in anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, organization theory, sociology, economics, history, counseling, political science.

*All students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours within the foundational core to meet Indiana's Statewide Transfer General Education Core Curriculum. If a student satisfies all five required foundational areas and has earned fewer than 30 credits, he or she must complete an additional course(s) from any foundational area in order to meet the minimum state requirement of 30 credit hours. However, if a student satisfies all five required foundational areas in fewer than 30 credit hours and remains at the Purdue-West Lafayette campus through graduation, he or she will be considered as having completed the core curriculum. The requirement for 30 credit hours applies only when the student may transfer to another Indiana institution and wants his/her core curriculum to count.

Alignment of Indiana's Statewide Transfer General Education Core and Purdue's Core Curriculum

Statewide Transfer General Education Core FAQs

  • Students graduating from Purdue should be able to communicate, orally and in writing, in ways appropriate to their fields of study and future careers. Effective communication is founded on information literacy, which involves the ability to use appropriate information to learn and explore ideas, demonstrate understanding of a subject, and convey one’s conclusions. At the embedded outcome level, effective communication assumes basic fluency with such things as grammar, organization and structure. It also focuses on being able to convey ideas concisely in ways appropriate for the context, audience and purpose. At this level, students should recognize that communication occurs within and across communities, such as academic, public or professional, where ideas are formulated, debated, and weighed against one another.
  • Key outcomes may include:
    • Demonstrates successful execution of organization, content, presentation, format and stylistic choices through appropriate genres of written or oral communication.
    • Demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate, select, analyze and synthesize relevant information sources for communicative purposes.
    • Demonstrates the ability to select and successfully convey ideas through modes of communication appropriate for specific purposes and audiences, which may include an essay, report, scientific poster, video, social media, etc.
    • Engages with and uses information sources to communicate that are in accord with ethical standards and legal requirements, such as giving credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation.
  • Success in life requires the ability to think critically, practically, and creatively within an ethical framework. Critical thinking is the process of gathering information, analyzing it in various ways including quantitative and qualitative methods, and evaluating it for the purpose of solving a problem or making a decision. Practical thinking is the ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions and to shape the environment so as to produce the desired results. Creative thinking is the ability to generate novel ideas that can lead to change. It is essential that the ethical implications of actions that result from these thought processes are carefully considered.
  • Key outcomes may include:
    • Demonstrates the ability to gather, analyze and evaluate information.
    • Connects disparate pieces of information to infer relationships.
    • Demonstrates open-mindedness and flexibility in expression, decision making, and problem solving.
    • Applies knowledge and skills previously learned to new circumstances.
    • Considers multiple possible explanation or solutions rather than one.
    • Accepts mistakes and learns from them.
    • Acts in a fair and thoughtful manner.
  • Students graduating from Purdue University should be able to work effectively with others in various ways including in cross-cultural situations and in a global civil society. Interpersonal skills include the ability to work effectively with others both in professional practice and in relating to those outside of the discipline, in leadership roles, and as members of a team. Intercultural knowledge is founded on the ability to appreciate and critique multiple perspectives including one’s own and to engage in civil discourse on complex global issues. It requires respect for and responsiveness to the beliefs and practices and cultural and linguistic needs of diverse populations. Students can acquire and practice these skills in ways appropriate to their fields of study and future
  • Key outcomes may include:
    • Demonstrates the ability to work with others in leadership and/or team roles in professional practice and in relating to the public.
    • Demonstrates understanding of diverse populations in relation to history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices.
    • Demonstrates understanding of the rights and obligations that students have as citizens in communities, nations and the world.
    • Demonstrates interpersonal skills and intercultural knowledge in discipline-specific ways, which may include but are not limited to courses, study abroad, internships, community service, fieldwork, undergraduate research, capstone projects, student teaching, performances and exhibitions, and honors theses.

 

For University Senate document 11-7 (original 2012) establishing the Purdue University outcomes-based undergraduate core curriculum, please click here.

For University Senate document 11-7 (revised 2015) establishing the Purdue University outcomes-based undergraduate core curriculum, please click here.

For a complete description of all foundational and embedded learning outcomes (revised 2015), please click here.

Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-4600

© 2016-2017 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Office of the Provost

Trouble with this page? Disability-related accessibility issue? Please contact Office of The Provost at purdueprovost@purdue.edu.