We want to make sure you maintain your scholarship eligibility for the full four years, so we've compiled a list of actions that could impact your scholarship. Please refer to this list regularly and consult with your Purdue Promise coach if anything ever applies to you.

Download a summary of the issues addressed below here.

Academic Concerns

Dropping below 15 Credits

To track toward on-time graduation (4 years) all students should take at least 15 credits a semester. Additionally, 21st Century Scholars who began enrolling in college fall 2013 and after must meet the 30-60-90 credit completion requirement to maintain scholarship eligibility, which mandates 15 hours a semester. If we find that you are registered for less than 15 credits, we will contact you to find out why. If you need to drop below 15 credits during a semester, please visit your Purdue Promise Coach before doing so. You can schedule an appointment here.

Withdrawing from a Class, Classes, or the Entire Semester

Depending on the timing of withdrawing from a class or several classes, your financial aid could be in jeopardy. Before visiting your advisor, professors, department head, and/or the Student Assistance Center to drop classes or completely withdraw, contact your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss and review the following:

Retaking a Class

Federal regulations impact how financial aid can be used for classes taken more than once. Please visit the Division of Financial Aid’s repeat coursework policy before discussing retaking classes with your advisor. The Satisfactory Academic Progress policy should also be taken into consideration, particularly if you are on Warning for PACE.

Receiving an Grade of “F” or “Incomplete”

Failing grades and incompletes affect your ability to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. Incompletes also prevent you from moving forward in your plan of study. View the policy on completing Incompletes to avoid them turning into failing grades here.

Changing Your Major

The following should be taken into consideration before changing your major.

  • How will it affect your time to graduation?
  • What are the CODO requirements for the new major you are interested in?
  • If you have poor grades in classes from your previous major, will you retake them?
  • How many credits will you have by the time you graduate?

Studying Abroad

21st Century Scholars and/or Purdue Promise funding can only be used for certain types of Study Abroad programs. This handout explains how your scholarships can or cannot work with study abroad. However, once you and your advisor have decided when study abroad might fit into your plan of study, it may be best to schedule an appointment with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss this in more detail. Your coach can also review help you:

  • Review additional scholarship opportunities to fund your study abroad experience;
  • Create a list of questions to ask your study abroad advisor; and
  • workWwith financial aid to reduce impact on your scholarships and personal finances.

Once you meet with your Purdue Promise Coach you can then meet with a study abroad advisor to explore options, and the three of you can work together to choose the best plan for you.

Participating in a Co-op Program

Participating in a co-op program is an excellent opportunity to gain real-world experience toward a future career in your field. However, participating can have scholarship implications as it affects your ability to maintain continuous full-time enrollment, and may impact your ability to meet credit completion requirements. If you are interested in participating in the co-op program, meet with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss the following:

  • Deferring Purdue Promise aid to future semesters;
  • Filing a State appeal if you ever will not meet the 30-60-90 credit completion requirement;
  • Building a school / work rotation schedule that will maximize your aid eligibility; and
  • Exemptions or alternate plans for Purdue Promise support program requirements.

Interning Away from Campus for a Fall / Spring Semester

Completing a semester internships is an excellent opportunity to gain real-world experience toward a future career in your field. However, doing so can have scholarship implications as it affects your ability to maintain continuous full-time enrollment, and may impact your ability to meet credit completion requirements. If you are interested in interning during a regular fall or spring semester, meet with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss the following:

  • Deferring Purdue Promise aid to future semesters;
  • Filing a Merit Appeal for loss of Purdue Promise eligibility;
  • Filing a State appeal if you ever will not meet the 30-60-90 credit completion requirement; and
  • Exemptions or alternate plans for Purdue Promise support program requirements.

Taking Summer Classes

Taking summer classes can be a good way to catch up on credit completion requirements, retake classes, boost your GPA, or get ahead on your plan of study. As you begin talking with your advisor about registering for summer classes, be sure to also talk with your Purdue Promise Coach about summer funding. Here are some important things to know:

  • In most cases, 21st Century Scholars awards cannot be used in the summer.
  • Purdue Promise scholarships cannot be used in the summer.
  • There is a separate Summer Aid Application through Financial Aid that is available in late-March.
  • If you enroll at a Purdue regional campus, both your grades and credits transfer.
  • If you enroll at a non-Purdue campus, credits transfer but grades to not transfer.
  • At the Purdue West Lafayette campus, you must take at least 6 credit hours to receive aid.
  • At the Purdue West Lafayette campus it costs the same to take 6 hours or 9 hours.
  • There are on-campus housing options through University Residences for the summer.

For summer 2015, if you are a first-year or second-year 21st Century Scholar or Frank O’Bannon Higher Education Award recipient and you are expected to not meet your credit completion requirement (30-60-90 for 21st Century Scholars and 24-48-72 for Frank O’Bannon HEA recipients), you may be eligible for the Summer Scholarship Program to help you meet the requirement. The scholarship covers:

  • 6-9 credits in Summer I and Summer II modules
  • 8 weeks of on-campus housing (or prorated equivalent for off-campus housing)
  • 13 week on-campus meal plan (or prorated equivalent for off-campus housing)
  • Books

To qualify as a 21st Century Scholar, you must have a 1.8 cumulative GPA at the end of spring 2015 and have completed at least 21 credits if you are a first-year student or 51 credits if you are a second-year student.

To qualify as a Frank O’Bannon HEA recipient, you must have a 1.8 cumulative GPA at the end of spring 2015 and have completed at least 15 credits if you are a first-year student or 39 credits if you are a second-year student.

Enrolling in a 3+ Program

Purdue Promise funding is restricted to undergraduate study, which means once you enroll as a graduate student or professional student you will no longer be eligible for Purdue Promise funding.

21st Century Scholar funding is restricted to undergraduate study or professional study in a situation in which a first Bachelor’s degree has not already been earned (example: Pharmacy School). Graduate students are only eligible to use 21st Century Scholars funding for professional medicine programs.

Emerging Urban Leaders funding is restricted to undergraduate study or professional study in a situation in which a first Bachelor’s degree has not already been earned (example: Pharmacy School). Once you are considered graduate student status you are no longer eligible for your award.

Some Purdue programs offer 3+1 or 3+2 options, which allow students to pursue a plan of study that combines undergraduate and graduate/professional degrees in 4 or 5 years. Before applying for these programs, you should consider implications on your financial aid based on the aforementioned eligibility information pertaining to graduate school and professional school. It will be important to know when your status will switch from undergraduate to graduate/professional. You can also find information on financial aid for graduate students by clicking here.

Transferring

If you are considering transferring to another institution, you should know that doing so will make you ineligible for Purdue Promise, as the aware requires continuous, full-time enrollment on our campus. Please work with your Purdue Promise Coach and academic advisor to determine if transferring is in your best interest. If so, you will want to speak with your Purdue Promise Coach about the following:

  • Changing your school of choice in eStudent to transfer your 21st Century Scholars award
  • Ensuring that you continue to file your FAFSA on time, even if temporarily not enrolled
  • Working with the Financial Aid office at your new campus to determine additional aid eligibility
  • Ensuring that you can continue to meet 21st Century Scholar credit completion requirements
  • Updating your post-Purdue contact information in myPurdue and with Purdue Promise
  • Making sure there are no holds on your account so you can get copies of official transcripts

Non-Academic Concerns

Living Off Campus (including Greek and Cooperative housing)

Purdue Promise commits to covering your financial need, which is your cost of attendance minus your estimated family contribution (EFC), as determined by your FAFSA. You should know that Purdue now calculates the cost of attendance for off-campus students differently than the calculation for on-campus students, and off-campus students receive less funds for room/board (housing and food). You can view the difference in cost of attendance for on-campus vs. off-campus here. Below are some things you need to consider when living off campus. You should meet with your Purdue Promise Coach to review how your financial aid works with off-campus housing before signing a lease agreement.

  • Cost of attendance room/board calculations are for the academic year, but leases are usually for the calendar year (you will have to find a way to personally finance your lease in the summer)
  • On-campus housing costs include a meal plan, a furnished room, an utilities; these items are usually paid separately with off-campus housing
  • On-campus housing and meal plan charges are included on your bill and automatically paid with your financial aid before you receive a refund; off-campus leases usually begin around August 1 and you cannot get your refund to pay rent and expenses until at least 1 week before the start of classes (so you will have to front the cost of down payments, first month’s rent, and utilities)

Substantial Life Changes

Pregnancy

If you or your partner becomes pregnant, you should visit with your Purdue Promise Coach to be referred to resources that can assist with the increases costs of medical care and supporting a child. Your Purdue Promise Coach can also review with you whether you may qualify for independent status and/or a budget adjustment to increase financial aid to support the child. Your coach can also help you develop a plan to ensure your academic success while supporting your child.

Marriage

Getting married has implications for your dependency status, which affects financial aid. How your financial aid is affected is based on your FAFSA, and how you fill out your FAFSA is dependent on the timing of your marriage.

If on the day you fill out your FAFSA you are married, you will file your FAFSA as married and your FAFSA will be based on you and your spouse. If on the day you fill out the FAFSA you are not married, you will still file the FAFSA as dependent and include your parent(s) or legal guardian(s), even if you plan to get married that academic year. Marriage does not qualify as a reason to adjust financial aid packages mid-year.

Claiming Dependents

If you have custody of your own children or siblings, or if you provide 51% or more of the support for another child, you may be able to claim independent status for FAFSA and financial aid purposes. You should visit with your Purdue Promise Coach to be referred to resources that can assist with the increases costs of supporting a child, and whether you may qualify for a budget adjustment to increase financial aid to support the child. Your coach can also help you develop a plan to ensure your academic success while supporting your dependent(s).

Declaring Independent Status

For financial aid you are considered a dependent of your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) until age 24 regardless of their financial support for your college education. There are reasons why you may be considered independent, and your status may change during your time in college. Visit here to review why you may qualify for independent status. The site also explains what to do if your parents are reluctant to support you financially or provide FAFSA information, as well as what to do if you have had an irreconcilable break with your parents.

Loss of Parent(s) or Guardian(s)

If you experience the loss of a parent or guardian, please contact your Purdue Promise Coach for assistance with the following:

  • Filing for excused absence(s) under the Grief Absence Policy if you are away for a funeral
  • Change in dependency status for financial aid
  • Grief support through CAPS and/or the Student Assistance Center
  • Managing impact on academic success (and potential SAP appeal if there is a negative impact)
  • Merit Appeal process for loss of scholarship if temporary withdrawal is necessary
  • Financial aid implications if temporary withdrawal is necessary

Family Crisis

If you experience a family crisis, please contact your Purdue Promise Coach for assistance with the following:

Moving to Another State (applies to your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) too)

If you are a 21st Century Scholar, State law requires that you and the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) you list on the FAFSA remain Indiana residents during the entirety of your award eligibility. If you anticipate that your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) will move out of state, please schedule an appointment with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss potential consequences and the State appeal process.

Taking Out an Emergency Loan

There are times when it may be necessary for you to consider an emergency loan. While this service is meant to be helpful in temporary time of need, there can be negative implications if you do not pay the loan back on time, including:

  • A hold being placed on your account that prevents registration, graduation, and receipt of transcripts;
  • Being sent to University Collections;
  • Having to complete the Financial Responsibility Program; and/or
  • Not being eligible for future emergency loans.

In some cases, it may be in your best interest to consider a budget adjustment, or converting your Federal Work Study eligibility to a loan. If you are having financial difficulty, please schedule an appointment with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss the best option for you.

Applying for Private Scholarships

This site explains that you cannot be over awarded financial aid. This means that if you are fully funded through Purdue Promise, applying for and receiving outside scholarships will not put extra money in your pocket. Instead, accepting a private award will reduce your current financial aid package to accommodate the new award.

There may be times that you should investigate private scholarships. These include, but may not be limited to:

  • Expecting that you will have an Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) in the upcoming year;
  • Needing additional support for increased expenses associated with study abroad;
  • Needing support for summer classes;
  • Wanting to decline Federal Work Study eligibility;
  • Expect increased costs that could be justified by a budget adjustment appeal; and
  • Planning to stay enrolled beyond your 4th year, after which your are no longer eligible for 21st Century Scholars and Purdue Promise.

If you feel like one of these situations or another extenuating circumstance applies to you, please schedule an appointment with your Purdue Promise Coach to discuss the best option for you.

Student Success at Purdue, KRCH 4th Floor, 1198 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-9328, studentsuccess@purdue.edu

2014 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Student Success

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact Office of Student Success at studentsuccess@purdue.edu.