Research news

lee-sensorPrintable Purdue biosensor simultaneously records, makes images of tissues and organs

Surgeons may soon be able to localize critical regions in tissues and organs during a surgical operation thanks to a new, patent-pending Purdue University biosensor that can be printed in 3D using an automated printing system.


warsinger-airBring the outdoors in: The energy-efficient method for using 100% outdoor air in buildings

By now, it’s well known that circulating outdoor air in buildings is safer than recirculating indoor air. That point was driven home by the pandemic. Problem is, it’s just not cost-effective.


pushkar-photosynthesisSoaking up the sun: Artificial photosynthesis promises a clean, sustainable source of energy

Humans can do lots of things that plants can’t do. We can walk around, we can talk, we can hear and see and touch. But plants have one major advantage over humans: They can make energy directly from the sun.


epidermal-tissuePurdue plant biologists solve major cell puzzle on path to leaf engineering

Leaves are the primary plant organs responsible for photosynthesis. Their size, shape and angles — all affected by cell patterning and growth — can also expose more of their surface to the sun, increasing energy stores and grain production in crops. Epidermal cells on the outer leaf surface control the growth of the organ and form in highly convoluted jigsaw-like shapes. Understanding how plant cells control those complex cell sizes and shapes is a major goal of plant biology.


wodicka-portraitEvery newborn on a ventilator can now be better protected, thanks to technology that helps prevent a common breathing tube incident

If a newborn is moved or becomes agitated while on a ventilator, the breathing tube also could move. Just a few seconds with the tube in the wrong position might lead to a critical lack of oxygen to the brain, possibly resulting in lifelong disability or brain damage or even ending the baby’s life.


martinez-coilOGForget wearables: Future washable smart clothes powered by Wi-Fi will monitor your health

Purdue University engineers have developed a method to transform existing cloth items into battery-free wearables resistant to laundry. These smart clothes are powered wirelessly through a flexible, silk-based coil sewn on the textile.


Research news archive

Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-4600

© 2015-20 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Office of Strategic Communications

Trouble with this page? Disability-related accessibility issue? Please contact News Service at purduenews@purdue.edu.