Course Guide

2014 - Fall

The courses listed with section and instructor information are offered Fall 2014.

APPROVED: These courses are approved for the Gerontology Program

Legacy Name Course Title Course Hours Course Credits Course Professor
GRAD 61200 Responsible Conduct of Research W 9:30-11:20 (Aug 25-Oct 21 1 Peter E. Dunn
GRAD 61200 Responsible Conduct of Research W 9:30-11:20 (Oct 22-Dec 13)   1 Peter E. Dunn
GRAD 61200 Responsible Conduct of Research T 1:30-3:20 (Aug 25-Oct 21 1 Robert E. Pruitt
GRAD 61200 Responsible Conduct of Research T 1:30-3:20 (Oct 22-Dec 13)   1 Robert E. Pruitt
HDFS 62700 Multilevel Modeling in Development and Family Research TR 12:30-1:15 3 Sharon L. Christ
PSY 53500 Psychology of Death and Dying TR 3:00-4:15 3 Victor G. Cicirelli
SLHS 51100 Seminar in Aging and Communication R 3:00-5:50 3 Jiyeon Lee
SLHS 53800 Motor Disorders of Speech MWF 1:30-2:20 3 Jessica E. Huber
SOC 57200 Comparative Healthcare Systems TR 10:30-11:45 3 James G. Anderson
SOC 57300 The Human Side of Medicine TR 3:00-4:15 3 James G. Anderson
 

CONTINGENT APPROVAL: The following courses are approved for the Gerontology Program, contingent on instruction by a CALC Faculty Associate and/or substantive aging content or flexibility to individualize major project/paper on a topic in gerontology.

Courses: 2
HK 66800 Seminar in Exercise Physiology TR 3:00-4:15 3 Timothy P. Gavin
SOC 67400 Seminar in Medical Sociology: Early Origins R 4:30-7:20 3 Kenneth F. Ferraro

PRIOR APPROVAL REQUIRED: The following course/s require prior approval from your advisor to count toward your gerontology credential

BIOL 55900 Endocrinology TR  1:30-2:45       3 John N. Anderson

Whereas new courses are developed or taught with variable topics, students may request approval for additional courses with significant content related to gerontology. To request approval, submit course description, syllabus, and brief rationale to calc@purdue.edu.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

APPROVED: These courses are approved for the Gerontology Program.

EDPS 56200 / SLHS 54000 ‐ Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Credit Hours: 3.00. Introduction to augmentative and alternative communication. Cognitive, educational, physical, psycho‐social, and linguistic aspects are considered together with symbol characteristics, teaching strategies, and research issues. Typically offered Fall.
GRAD 61200 ‐ Responsible Conduct of Research
Credit Hours: 1.00. Overview of values, professional standards, and regulations that define responsible conduct in research. Students learn the values and standards of responsible research through readings and lecture/discussion and practice application of these values and standards to research situations through class discussion of case studies from life sciences research. Students must be registered for M.S. or Ph.D. thesis research in their home department. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
HDFS 62700 ‐ Multilevel Modeling In Developmental and Family Research
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course gives students a basic grounding in the class of statistical techniques known as multilevel modeling (MLM), also known as hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), mixed models, or random coefficient models. Primary discussions will be on applications of these models to the study of marriages, relationships, families, aging, and child and adult development, but also will touch on biomedical, educational, and economic examples. The focus is on three types of multilevel models: growth‐curve models, organizational models, and daily experience models. Students will also learn how to use SAS Proc Mixed for conducting MLM analyses. Students are assumed to have taken at least two graduate statistics courses and have a solid understanding of regression analysis. Typically offered Fall.
HDFS 63300 – Adult Development and Relationships
Credit Hours: 3.00. Examination of reciprocal influences between adults’ relationships and individual development. Consideration of how relationships with friends, families, and the broader social network contribute to the course of development across adulthood. Critical review of research that focuses on how close and distal social partners affect physical, cognitive, and emotional well being throughout adulthood. The effects of changes in social relationships on well being also will be discussed.
HDFS 64900 ‐ Multidisciplinary Gerontology
Credit Hours: 3.00. A multidisciplinary overview of aging that provides a background for graduate studies on aging. An examination of sociological, psychological, and biological theory and research in the field of aging. The aging process from cells to social security will be covered. Guest lectures introduce students to experts in gerontology on Purdue's campus. Projects will assist students in developing appropriate professional skills in their field of study. Students are expected to have basic research and writing skills in their field of study. The course serves as a graduate‐level introduction to the field of gerontology. There are several options for course projects. Typically offered Spring.
PSY 53500 ‐ Psychology of Death and Dying
Credit Hours: 3.00. An examination of psychological research and theory related to death and the dying process. Topics include death concepts, attitudes, and fears, psychosocial predictors of death, effects of death on survivors, psycho‐social factors related to individual differences and normative dying behaviors, stages of dying, effects of pain and drugs, and managing the dying process. Typically offered Spring.
PSY 56000 ‐ Cognitive Functioning in Older Adults
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course provides the student with understanding of cognitive functioning in older adults. Although age differences in sensory systems, attention, perception, and memory will be reviewed, the course will focus on higher order cognitive functioning, such as individual and collaborative problem solving, reasoning, decision making, intelligence, creativity, and wisdom. Typically offered Spring.
PSY 56100 ‐ Personality And Social Functioning In Older Adults
Credit Hours: 3.00. Personality and social behavior of the aged are examined. Emphasis is placed on understanding how stability for certain psychological functions and behaviors is maintained and how change occurs in others. Typically offered Spring.
SLHS 51100 ‐ Seminar in Aging and Communication
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course examines normal age‐related changes to the systems of communication. This includes anatomic and physiologic changes to the respiratory, laryngeal, and supralaryngeal systems and the resulting functional changes to speech production and changes to speech perception, language, cognition, emotional processing, and memory. A background that includes basic anatomy and physiology, neurophysiology, and linguistics is preferred. Typically offered Fall.
SLHS 53100 ‐ Language Disorders in Adults
Credit Hours: 3.00. Study of the causes, assessment, and treatment of acquired language disorders in adults, including aphasia, right hemisphere syndromes, and dementia. Typically offered Spring.
SLHS 53800 ‐ Motor Disorders of Speech
Credit Hours: 2.00. A study of the neuropathologies that affect the speech production system. Emphasizes the differential diagnosis and management of acquired motor speech disorders. Typically offered Spring.
SLHS 61900 ‐ Neural Systems for Language Processing
Credit Hours: 2.00. This course will explore how the brain is organized for language processing across the lifespan in typical development, in developmental disorders, and in disease.
SOC 57200 ‐ Comparative Healthcare Systems
Credit Hours: 3.00. Using cost, quality, and access to care as core concepts, this course explores healthcare in comparative context. Special topics are health and gender, the environment, epidemics, long‐term care, technology, and rationing, among others. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
SOC 57300 ‐ The Human Side of Medicine
Credit Hours: 3.00. Focuses on sociological theory and research related to social conflicts over the delivery of healthcare in the U.S. Considers social issues pertaining to abortion, AIDS, human experimentation, reproductive technologies, euthanasia, and others. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
SOC 57400 ‐ The Social Organization of Healthcare
Credit Hours: 3.00. Analysis of the determinants and consequences of the social organization of medical care. Considers morbidity and mortality, costs and utilization of medical services, healthcare occupations and institutions, and change in programs and policies. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
SOC 57600 ‐ Health and Aging in Social Context
Credit Hours: 3.00. Analysis of the social and cultural influences on health in adulthood and later life. Considers distribution of illness among older adults, health behavior, and health services use, including long‐term care. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
SOC 67700 ‐ Research Seminar on Aging and the Life Course
Credit Hours: 1.00. An interdisciplinary seminar examining recent research on aging and the responsible conduct of research. Emphasis is given to professional development in gerontology and related fields. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
VCS 65000 ‐ Biology of Aging
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. Provides students with an overview of prevailing theories, experimental data, and human observations pertinent to the biology of aging. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Spring.

CONTINGENT APPROVAL: The following courses are approved for the Gerontology Program, contingent on instruction by a CALC Faculty Associate and/or substantive aging content or flexibility to individualize major project/paper on a topic in gerontology.

BIOL 56200 / PSY 51200 ‐ Neural Systems and Behavior
Credit Hours: 3.00. Overview of the structure and function of neural systems including those involved with motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory, learning, memory, and higher cortical processes. Molecular and cellular aspects of neural function are integrated with discussion of relevant neuroanatomy. Background in cell biology, psychobiology, physiology or anatomy is recommended. Typically offered Spring.
HDFS 59000 ‐ Social Relationships and Health
Credit Hours: 3.00. Social ties and interactions with close social partners and association with individual health, management of disease, and psychological well-being are covered. Course reviews research on social ties and health from a multidisciplinary perspective.
HDFS 60500 ‐ Seminar in Family and the Life Course
Credit Hours: 3.00. Intensive critical analysis of research and theory regarding family development and life course analysis. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
HDFS 61200 – Families in Social Context
Credit Hours: 3.00. Advanced study of the reciprocal effects of families and their social environments. Theory and research are reviewed and critically analyzed. Readings consider the mutual effects of families and their diverse contexts. Links between families and other social institutions are explored. Particular attention is given on how social contexts shape micro‐level family interaction and organization.
HK 66800 – Seminar in Exercise Physiology
Credit Hours: 3.00. Review of literature; design and conduct of research in an area of current interest in exercise physiology. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Spring, Fall, Summer.
SLHS 53900 ‐ Dysphagia
Credit Hours: 3.00. A study of the normal and disordered anatomy and physiology of the swallowing process. Principles of evaluation and treatment of dysphagia are discussed. Typically offered Fall.
SOC 60900 – Seminar in Sociology – variable topics
Credit Hours: 3.00.
Seminar in Sociology : Family, Aging and the Life Course
Understanding the relationships among social structural factors, family relationships, and psychological well‐being in the later years, will explore topics specific to later‐life family, such as family caregiving, widowhood, and grandparenting.
SOC 65900 ‐ Seminar in Marriage and the Family
Credit Hours: 3.00. Seminar in Marriage and the Family. Offered in alternate years. Typically offered Spring.
SOC 67400 – Seminar in Medical Sociology – variable topics
Credit Hours: 2.00 or 3.00. Typically offered Spring.
Seminar in Medical Sociology: Early Origins of Adult Health
This seminar examines how the early life experiences shape health status in adulthood. Readings for this emerging area of inquiry are drawn from medical sociology, sociology of aging, and life course epidemiology.

Seminar in Medical Sociology: Minority Health
This seminar examines the health status and health behavior of minority Americans. A life course perspective is emphasized, from birth to later life, in examining disparities between African, Asian, Hispanic, Native, and White Americans. Readings for this emerging area of inquiry are drawn from medical sociology, life course epidemiology, and health services research.
SOC 68100 ‐ Selected Problems of Social Research: Longitudinal Data Analysis
Credit Hours: 3.00. Working with already available data, each student will conduct one or more research projects, including conceptualization, operational procedures, analysis of the data, and report writing. The data to be used may be from surveys, small group studies, organizational studies, or written documents. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall, Spring.
VCS 60200 – Problems in Clinical Medicine and Surgery ‐ variable topics
Problems in Clinical Medicine and Surgery : Aging and Cancer Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. This seminar examines the antecedents and consequences of cancer in mammals. Drawing from comparative oncology, special attention is given to the properties of neoplasms at various ages of the organism studied.

Problems in Clinical Medicine and Surgery : Directed Study in Endocrinology of Aging Credit hours: 2.00. The goal of this course is to provide students with a directed look at prevailing theories, experimental data, and human observations pertinent to the endocrinology of aging.

PRIOR APPROVAL REQUIRED: The following course/s require prior approval from your advisor to count toward your gerontology credential.

BIO 55900 ‐ Endocrinology
Credit Hours: 3.00. The study of hormone function. Consideration will be given to the role of hormones in growth, development, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction. Typically offered Fall.

Whereas new courses are developed or taught with variable topics, students may request approval for additional courses with significant content related to gerontology. To request approval, submit course description, syllabus, and brief rationale to calc@purdue.edu.