Recent News

Antioxidant effects on dementia risk may differ

May 24, 2022

Higher blood levels of some antioxidants, but not others, were associated with a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. More studies are needed to see if adding these antioxidants to the diet could help prevent or slow cognitive decline.

Antioxidant effects on dementia risk may differ

Scientists discover a potential new marker to personalized therapy for breast cancer

May 24, 2022

A new study has discovered that 'crown-like structures' surrounding breast tumors in overweight and obese patients could hinder their response to therapy. The findings of this study could potentially be used to improve personalized treatment for patients with HER2+ overexpressed breast cancer.

Scientists discover a potential new marker to personalized therapy for breast cancer

Desire for son in Nepal may impact on girls' health and wellbeing -- new study

May 23, 2022

The desire for a son could mean Nepali mothers stop breastfeeding infant daughters sooner, says new research. Girls in Nepal are breastfed for fewer months than boys on average, with girls with older sisters but no brothers being the most disadvantaged, says the study. And this shorter breastfeeding time is linked to a greater risk of death for Nepali infants in the study.

Desire for son in Nepal may impact on girls' health and wellbeing -- new study

2022 Faculty Awards Convocation Awardees

May 19, 2022

Teaching Awards Class of 2022 Outstanding Innovation in Helping Students Learn Award: Mark A. Lipton, Associate Professor, Chemistry Clifford B. Kinley Trust Award: Natalia Maria Rodriguez, Public Health Showalter Faculty Scholar: Mingji Dai, Chemisty, Haley Oliver and Yuan Yao

2022 Faculty Awards Convocation Awardees

Flaherty Honored; Hardiman, Liang Promoted

May 18, 2022

Dr. Elizabeth Flaherty was selected as Outstanding Club/Organization Advisor of the Year for the Purdue College of Agriculture, receiving the student-choice award as part of the College of Ag’s Spring Awards Banquet on April 27.

Flaherty Honored; Hardiman, Liang Promoted

Health screening, genetic tests might identify people at risk of premature heart disease

May 18, 2022

Health screening and genetic tests might identify more than 1 million U.S. adults who have familial hypercholesterolemia, a common genetic disorder that causes elevated bad cholesterol levels, which may lead to premature cardiovascular disease. Identifying familial hypercholesterolemia early in adulthood creates an opportunity for early treatment aimed at preventing heart attack and death, according to a new study.

Health screening, genetic tests might identify people at risk of premature heart disease

New weight-loss intervention targets instinctive desire to eat

May 18, 2022

People who are highly responsive to food lost more weight and kept it off using a new weight loss program that targets internal hunger cues and the ability to resist food.

New weight-loss intervention targets instinctive desire to eat

Viral infections during pregnancy affect maternal care behavior

May 18, 2022

Viral infections during pregnancy affect the mother's brain and her postpartum care behavior. These are the findings of a research study in a mouse model.

Viral infections during pregnancy affect maternal care behavior

Reliable diagnostics at the tip of your finger

May 18, 2022

Biomarkers are components that may be present in biological samples and are related to specific diseases. Therefore, doctors can analyze biological samples from a patient to check their health condition or to monitor the progress of a specific therapy. Typically, these samples need to be purified and diluted before the analysis, and current medical diagnostic techniques rely on healthcare facilities and laboratories for these routine analyses. This is a lengthy process that requires trained personnel and expensive instrumentation to extract, transport, store, process, and analyze the samples in centralized locations. Moreover, during a period of global crisis like the ongoing pandemic, the pressure of thousands of analysis requests can saturate and collapse the healthcare system.

Reliable diagnostics at the tip of your finger

Women who embraced their partner subsequently had lower stress-induced cortisol response

May 18, 2022

Women instructed to embrace their romantic partner prior to undergoing a stressful experience had a lower biological stress response -- as indicated by levels of the stress hormone cortisol in saliva -- compared to women who did not embrace their partner. This effect was not seen for men.

Women who embraced their partner subsequently had lower stress-induced cortisol response