Recent News

Andrew Whelton Travels to Colorado in Aftermath of Marshall Fire

January 21, 2022

Faculty affiliate Andrew Whelton recently traveled to Colorado at the request of community leaders to assess and assist in response and recovery following the Marshall Wildfire.

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Purdue-Discovered Drug Strengthens Fight Against Cancer

January 21, 2022

Philip Low, Purdue University’s Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery and the Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, developed a recently FDA-approved drug called Cytalux, a fluorescent marker that allows cancer surgeons to quickly identify malignant cells and remove them during surgery.

Purdue-Discovered Drug Strengthens Fight Against Cancer

NIH awards $170 million for precision nutrition study

January 20, 2022

The National Institutes of Health is awarding $170 million over five years, pending the availability of funds, to clinics and centers across the country for a new study that will develop algorithms to predict individual responses to food and dietary routines. Nutrition for Precision Health, powered by the All of Us Research Program (NPH), will recruit a diverse pool of 10,000 participants who are part of the NIH’s All of Us Research Program to inform more personalized nutrition recommendations.

NIH awards $170 million for precision nutrition study

You Ask, We Answer question 4

January 19, 2022

"What is the effectiveness in percentage of the vaccine and booster against omicron?"

You Ask, We Answer question 4

Purdue research strengthens soybean's potential in the plant-based protein market

January 19, 2022

Although most of the world's soybean crop is fed to animals, a Purdue plant breeder thinks that soybean's complete protein — it contains all eight amino acids essential for human health — makes it the logical choice for the plant-based meat increasingly making its way onto consumers' tables.

Purdue research strengthens soybean's potential in the plant-based protein market

From failed medical devices to wrongful arrests, this is what happens when inclusive design takes a backseat

January 19, 2022

People interact with machines in countless ways every day. In some cases, they actively control a device, like driving a car or using an app on a smartphone. Sometimes people passively interact with a device, like being imaged by an MRI machine. And sometimes they interact with machines without consent or even knowing about the interaction, like being scanned by a law enforcement facial recognition system.

From failed medical devices to wrongful arrests, this is what happens when inclusive design takes a backseat

Purdue researchers take successful steps in potential cancer treatment

January 18, 2022

Medicinal chemistry researchers at Purdue University are further developing a potential immunotherapy treatment for cancer; this one focused on the particular mutation of an enzyme. "While recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has led to revolutionary success in multiple cancer types, most cancer patients do not benefit from immunotherapy," Zhong-Yin Zhang, head of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, and director of the Purdue Institute for Drug Discovery, said in a release. "Thus, there is an urgent need for additional strategies."

Purdue researchers take successful steps in potential cancer treatment

Purdue researchers take successful steps in potential cancer treatment

January 18, 2022

Medicinal chemistry researchers at Purdue University are further developing a potential immunotherapy treatment for cancer; this one focused on the particular mutation of an enzyme. "While recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has led to revolutionary success in multiple cancer types, most cancer patients do not benefit from immunotherapy," Zhong-Yin Zhang, head of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, and director of the Purdue Institute for Drug Discovery, said in a release. "Thus, there is an urgent need for additional strategies."

Purdue researchers take successful steps in potential cancer treatment

Researchers are working to deal with future outbreaks

January 18, 2022

As science struggles to contain the latest strain of COVID-19, the Omicron variant, experts are keeping a wary eye on what might come next.

Researchers are working to deal with future outbreaks

Survival rate increases for extremely preterm infants in NIH-funded research network

January 18, 2022

The survival rate of extremely preterm infants born from 2013 through 2018 in a large network of U.S. research centers improved to 78.3%, compared to 76% for infants born in the network from 2008 to 2012, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. Their study included more than 10,000 infants born at 22 to 28 weeks of pregnancy at 19 centers of the Neonatal Research Network funded by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). It was led by Edward F. Bell, M.D., of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, and appears in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Survival rate increases for extremely preterm infants in NIH-funded research network