Recent News

Eyes provide peek at Alzheimer’s disease risk

September 23, 2021

Amyloid plaques found in the retinas of eyes may be an indicator of similar plaques in the brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and may provide a more visible biomarker for detecting disease risk.

Eyes provide peek at Alzheimer’s disease risk

Parents’ smoking during childhood linked to rheumatoid arthritis later in life

September 14, 2021

A study found that girls whose parents smoked cigarettes were 75% more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis as adults. The findings suggest that secondhand smoke exposure in childhood may increase the risk for rheumatoid arthritis.

Parents’ smoking during childhood linked to rheumatoid arthritis later in life

Undergraduate Student Focus: Madison Hodges, Class of 2022

September 13, 2021

Madison Hodges, class of 2022 in Environmental and Ecological Sciences, has made her mark during her four years at Purdue as a student and community leader for sustainability.

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Scientists claim that overeating is not the primary cause of obesity

September 13, 2021

A perspective article challenges the 'energy balance model,' which says weight gain occurs because individuals consume more energy than they expend. According to the authors, 'conceptualizing obesity as a disorder of energy balance restates a principle of physics without considering the biological mechanisms underlying weight gain.' The authors argue for the 'carbohydrate insulin model,' which explains obesity as a metabolic disorder driven by what we eat, rather than how much. *Public health messaging exhorting people to eat less and exercise more has failed to stem rising rates of obesity and obesity-related diseases. *The energy balance model, which says weight gain is caused by consuming more energy than we expend, "restates a principle of physics without considering the biological mechanisms driving weight gain." *The carbohydrate-insulin model makes a bold claim: overeating doesn't cause obesity; the process of getting fat causes overeating. *The current obesity epidemic is due, in part, to hormonal responses to changes in food quality: in particular, high-glycemic load foods, which fundamentally change metabolism. *Focusing on what we eat rather than how much we eat is a better strategy for weight management.

Scientists claim that overeating is not the primary cause of obesity

Enhancing ordinary items for addressing health outcomes

September 13, 2021

As a child, Chi Hwan Lee always had Lego sets on his birthday list. Lee, who loves math and physics, would spend hours building the sets – following the instructions as well as his imagination.That imagination and those Lego pieces became the building blocks of Lee’s Purdue University research, which focuses on converting items like contact lenses and prosthetic hands into smart devices with specially designed electronic stickers to measure vision loss or simulate the sense of feeling. From solar cells to biomedical applications Lee, the Leslie A. Geddes associate professor of biomedical engineering in Purdue’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, says his passion for creating and assembling items continues to grow, thanks to the entrepreneurial and collaborative environment at Purdue. While his initial research involved developing additive manufacturing processes to convert solar cells and sensors to become flexible and even wearable, it was during his job interview at Purdue where faculty members asked if he had ever thought about using his solar cell work in a biomedical setting. That moment was pivotal for Lee, who now has a joint appointment in the School of Mechanical Engineering and a courtesy appointment in the School of Materials Engineering.

Enhancing ordinary items for addressing health outcomes

ECE professors, grad student co-authors on paper in Nature Communications

September 10, 2021

A paper from ECE professors Vladimir Shalaev and Alexandra Boltasseva’s research groups has been published in the journal Nature Communications. “High-harmonic generation in metallic titanium nitride” was published Aug. 17, 2021.

ECE professors, grad student co-authors on paper in Nature Communications

Welcome Arequipa Nexus New Co-Directors

September 10, 2021

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Hoagland and Dr. Leon-Salas as the Arequipa Nexus Institute’s new co-directors. Dr. Hoagland and Dr. Leon-Salas will provide leadership to the Nexus research initiatives, capacity training and knowledge exchange activities with the Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Peru (UNSA). They will continue to strengthen our partnership development and support new initiatives.

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Signs of dementia are written in the blood, reveals new study

September 10, 2021

Scientists have identified metabolic compounds within the blood that are associated with dementia. The study revealed that the levels of 33 metabolites differed in patients with dementia, compared to elderly people with no existing health conditions. Their findings could one day aid diagnosis and treatment of dementia.

Signs of dementia are written in the blood, reveals new study

Corn zein offers alternative for meat analogues

September 9, 2021

Bruce Hamaker, director of the Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research and distinguished professor of food science, has discovered a means for replicating animal protein textures to near perfection—with corn zein—a protein in corn.

Corn zein offers alternative for meat analogues

Mothers’ diabetes may induce premature aging of neural tissue leading to birth defects

September 9, 2021

About 300,000 to 400,000 fetuses per year from mothers with diabetes develop neural tube defects -- when the tissue that eventually forms the brain and spinal cord fails to form properly -- which can lead to miscarriage or profound disability. Now using studies in mice, researchers have identified the mechanism behind these structural birth defects, which they say is due to the neural tissue aging prematurely, halting its growth before it has made enough cells to finish forming the neural tube.

Mothers’ diabetes may induce premature aging of neural tissue leading to birth defects