Where are they now?

More Alumni

Andres E. Carrillo
Aleda Chen
Heidi IglayReger
Roland J. Thorpe
April J. Stull
Tetyana P. Shippee
Lindsay Pitzer
Min-Ah Lee
John Spruill III
Nicholas Turiano
Tim Wright
Oliver Wendt
Jori Sechrist
Megan MacPherson
Kathryn Berlin
Markus Schafer
Lori Ward
Megan Gilligan

Andres E. Carrillo, PhD ('10)

Andres E. Carrillo earned his PhD in 2010 from the Department of Health and Kinesiology with a minor in Gerontology. Currently, Dr. Carrillo is post-doctoral fellow within the FAME laboratory (Functional Architecture of Mammals in their Environment) at the Centre for Research and Technology Thessaly in Trikala, Greece. His current research is focused on human heat production via brown adipose tissue and its potential for regulating body weight and aging processes. In August 2012 Dr. Carrillo will be starting a new position as Assistant Professor at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA.

What do you remember best about your time in the Gerontology Program?

I remember always being intellectually challenged by the interdisciplinary nature of the program and by the students I met outside my discipline. We had many nice discussions both in and outside of the classroom. To use the words of Dr. Waters, these "out of silo experiences" were very extremely valuable for both my career and personal life. I will also never forget the time spent in the 'classroom' with Dr. Waters. His teachings were inspirational.

Who were your mentors and what attributes did they have that helped you?

My greatest mentors were Dr. David Waters and Dr. Michael Flynn. Dr. Waters has a unique passion for life that is inspiring. Among many things, he encouraged me to aspire toward courageous humility, and taught me the importance of self-renewal and stamina. Dr. Flynn taught me many theories and techniques related to exercise immunology, but most importantly, he taught me to have fun with work and to not take life so seriously. I was also heavily inspired by the teachings and mentorship of Drs. Dorothy Teegarden and Gerald Hyner.

How did you get interested in gerontology?

My PhD advisor, Dr. Flynn, encouraged me to look at what the gerontology program offered. He also asked that I assist with data collection for a study being conducted by Dr. Kyle L. Timmerman (another CALC Alumnus) at the Wastl Human Performance Laboratory. Dr. Timmerman's study was investigating the effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in older adults. It was my first real exposure to the field of gerontology. I was really intrigued by Dr. Timmerman's findings. He was beginning to make some real progress on exposing the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise. After some further reading, I realized how much I enjoyed this area of study and that the field of gerontology was a specialization of immense importance and opportunity. It was after these experiences that I decided to continue studying aging.

What experiences did you have at Purdue that helped form your current career?

One of the most important experiences I had at Purdue was the time I spent with Dr. Waters. His teachings have really changed the way I conduct research, write, and think. Another memorable experience was working with two very productive research groups within the Departments of Health and Kinesiology (Dr. Michael Flynn) and Foods and Nutrition (Dr. Dorothy Teegarden). By working in both labs I was able to learn a wide range of techniques and theories outside of my discipline that complemented my interests in gerontology. Currently, the combination of exercise, nutrition, and aging is the backbone of my career interests and future research plans.

Anything else you would like to add?

Being a part of this unique program has really changed my professional life. I really appreciate the unique opportunities I was offered by CALC and would recommend this program to any motivated student from any discipline.