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Past News

Research suggests new approach for treating inflammation

September 13, 2019

Researchers have discovered a mechanism that might alleviate inflammation by suppressing the migration of a type of white blood cells called neutrophils.

Research suggests new approach for treating inflammation

Research suggests new approach for treating inflammation

September 13, 2019

Medications that mitigate inflammation caused by a variety of diseases including rheumatic arthritis may also compromise a person’s immune system, but a new approach points to a possible solution to this problem. Researchers have discovered a mechanism that might alleviate inflammation by suppressing the migration of a type of white blood cells called neutrophils. The cells migrate within tissues in order to kill pathogens but may also cause excessive inflammation, resulting in tissue injury and other adverse effects. The scientists identified a genetic molecule called miR-199, a type of “microRNA,” which reduces the migration of neutrophils, therefore potentially relieving inflammation without compromising the immune system.

Research suggests new approach for treating inflammation

Díaz de la Rubia chosen to lead research enterprise at University of Oklahoma

September 12, 2019

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents voted Wednesday (Sept. 11) to appoint Tomás Díaz de la Rubia as Oklahoma’s new vice president for research and partnerships, effective Sept. 30.

Díaz de la Rubia chosen to lead research enterprise at University of Oklahoma

So-Called “Puppy Mills” Are Not All As Bad As We Think, Pioneering Research Suggests

September 11, 2019

Candace Croney's research into commercial breeding of dogs has become the first of it's kind in the world and it's challenging our understanding of how dog breeding is being done.

So-Called “Puppy Mills” Are Not All As Bad As We Think, Pioneering Research Suggests

Urine Levels of Compound Rise Quickly After Brain Injuries Linked to Parkinson’s, Study Finds

September 11, 2019

Explosions that cause even mild traumatic brain injury can trigger molecular changes that, later in life, lead to neuroinflammation and degeneration, and a greater risk of Parkinson’s disease. But work by researchers at Purdue University also found that analyzing urine levels of a compound called acrolein may help within days of such injury to identify people — like military veterans — at risk of developing Parkinson’s or other neurodegenerative disorders.

Urine Levels of Compound Rise Quickly After Brain Injuries Linked to Parkinson’s, Study Finds

Purdue team gets $3 million to explore consequences of sustainability policies

September 11, 2019

The National Science Foundation awarded $2.5 million to an interdisciplinary team led by Thomas Hertel, a Purdue distinguished professor of agricultural economics, to build the tools necessary to understand the global-local-global linkages underpinning future sustainability policies.

Purdue team gets $3 million to explore consequences of sustainability policies

Discovery Park to host DOE Energy Frontier Research Center Competition Workshop

September 10, 2019

Discovery Park will host a workshop for Purdue faculty and staff to help shape responses to the next U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) competition planned for fall 2019. This free event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 10 in the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, Room 121.

Discovery Park to host DOE Energy Frontier Research Center Competition Workshop

Miss the Convergence Conference? Watch the presentations here!

September 10, 2019

Video presentations from the Fourth Annual Conference on Convergence and the Future of Research are available to watch here.

Miss the Convergence Conference? Watch the presentations here!

DOE Career Award to help scientists use giraffe dung to make biofuels

September 10, 2019

People use enzymes to create fuels from plants, fungi to produce antimalarial drugs and E. coli bacteria to generate life-saving insulin. These systems are attractive because they are sustainable and rely on renewable plant biomass, but they are still wildly inefficient. Kevin Solomon, a Purdue assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, plans to improve the efficiency by using giraffe, wildebeest, zebra and horse dung and a U.S. Department of Energy Career Award, which supports the development of research programs by outstanding scientists early in their careers.

DOE Career Award to help scientists use giraffe dung to make biofuels

Michael J. Fox Foundation grants funding to Purdue-affiliate for earlier, non-invasive detection of Parkinson’s disease

September 10, 2019

The Michael J. Fox Foundation recently provided funding to a Purdue-affiliated startup working to aid in less strenuous, early detection of Parkinson’s and other diseases. According to a Purdue press release, MJFF is one of the world’s leading organizations centered on the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease. The foundation paired with Tymora Analytical Operations to help provide funding for the company’s EVtrap approach to the detection and diagnosis of the disease.

Michael J. Fox Foundation grants funding to Purdue-affiliate for earlier, non-invasive detection of Parkinson’s disease

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