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Chemicals associated with oxidative stress may be essential to development

July 12, 2018

Some level of molecules linked to oxidative stress may be essential to health and development, according to new animal studies. Reactive molecules derived from molecular oxygen, known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase dramatically in the body during times of environmental stress or disease. This stress can result in significant damage to cells and is associated with negative health consequences such as aging, male infertility, degenerative diseases and cancer.

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Purdue researchers developing device that detects mosquito-borne diseases, giving health officials time to take action

July 12, 2018

A startup created by Purdue University professors is developing a sensor that can detect dangerous mosquito-borne tropical diseases faster and at a lower cost than current methods, giving health officials time to take action before the viruses are transmitted to humans.

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Study: Airbnb benefits white neighborhoods; not so for black and Hispanic areas

July 11, 2018

Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could spill over into complementary industries, such as the restaurant business, unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests.

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Purdue delegation meets key Colombian officials to advance sustainable development

July 11, 2018

As the peace process continues to unfold in Colombia and the country begins transitioning to a new president, Suresh Garimella, executive vice president for research and partnerships at Purdue University, and Kenneth Foster, president’s fellow for Colombia-Purdue Partnerships and a professor of agricultural economics, visited the capital city of Bogotá in June to advance sustainable development in the Orinoquía region.

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Discovery Park to lead new Innovation Hub for Connected and Autonomous Transportation Technologies

July 9, 2018

Purdue University’s Discovery Park will lead a nationwide partnership focusing on the expanding research field of connected and autonomous vehicles.

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Environmental Toxicologist Jennifer Freeman selected to scope plan to assess the hazards of ‘Organohalogen Flame Retardants’

July 5, 2018

Jennifer Freeman, associate professor in the School of Health Sciences, has been a named to a new National Academy of Science committee to review the toxicity of flame-retardants materials.

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Purdue receives $1.8 million from DOE to solve biorefinery blockages

July 3, 2018

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – One of the biggest problems facing biorefinery operations is the flow of biomass into and throughout facilities. Lignocellulosic biomass, often made up of post-harvest agricultural materials such as corn stover and soybean hulls, often accumulates and compacts while moving through augers, forcing costly shutdowns for cleaning and repairs.

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Reconstruction of past climate provides clues about future climate change

July 2, 2018

Sediment cores drilled from the JOIDES Resolution helped researchers create a reconstruction of past climate.

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Cooks Group receives Agilent gift

July 2, 2018

Professor R. Graham Cooks’ research group is receiving a gift from Agilent Technologies, Inc. that will be used to explore ways of manipulating ions in the open air.

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Reconstruction of past climate provides clues about future climate change

July 2, 2018

Greenhouse gases were the main driver of climate throughout the warmest period of the past 66 million years, providing insight into the drivers behind long-term climate change. Antarctica and Australia separated around the end of the Eocene (56 to 22.9 million years ago), creating a deep water passage between them and changing ocean circulation patterns. Some researchers believe these changes were the drivers of cooling temperatures near the end of the Eocene "hothouse" period, but some think declining levels of carbon dioxide were to blame.

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