FACULTY RESEARCHERS INVITED TO PROPOSE TALKS FOR DAWN OR DOOM CONFERENCE

Dawn or Doom logo

MARCH-APRIL 2018 |

Dawn or Doom, Purdue’s annual conference examining risks and rewards of emerging technologies, has a tentative series of topical tracks and is looking for faculty speakers from any field whose research relates to one of the topics.

The proposed tracks include:

  • Machines: artificial intelligence, robotics, autonomous vehicles and drones
  • Mind: internet and social media effects
  • Body: bioengineering and human design
  • Universe: space and Mars habitats
  • Data: Internet of Things, privacy and cybersecurity

Faculty interested in speaking or suggesting a colleague as a speaker can Diana Hancock, conference director, at hancockd@purdue.edu.

Celebrating its fifth anniversary Nov. 5-6, Dawn or Doom is designed to create a dialogue about the effects of rapidly emerging technologies and features Purdue faculty experts and leading national authorities as conference speakers.

The conference on Purdue’s West Lafayette campus attracted more than 6,000 participants in 2017. Among others, they heard featured speakers such as Nick Thompson, WIRED editor-in-chief; Robb Fraley, Monsanto chief technology officer and the father of GMO crops; HPE’s Tom Bradicich, a leader in developing Internet of Things technology; and historian Michael Bess, author of “Our Grandchildren Redesigned: Life in the Bioengineered Society of the Near Future.”

The 2017 conference also was notable for the variety of related activities it included in collaboration with units throughout campus, from technology-themed art exhibits and a common book reading program to interactive virtual and augmented reality tours and the kind of network-connected car that we may be driving (or that may be driving us) in the near future.

Organizers are open to new collaborations for the 2018 Dawn or Doom conference and will also work with faculty who want to build class assignments around Dawn or Doom.

For more information, visit www.purdue.edu/dawnordoom.

Writer: Greg Kline, ITaP communications manager, gkline@purdue.edu