Outcome Language Updates, 3/23/2020

On March 23, 2020, the Purdue University Senate approved language changes to the following Foundational Learning Outcomes: Humanities (HUM), Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS), Written Communication (WC), Information Literacy (IL) and Science, Technology and Society (STS).

See below for a table of exisiting and new language. 

The UCC will implement these changes according to the following timelines:

    1. Transfer Courses must meet the March 23, 2020 outcome language to be added to the master list of approved courses.
    2. PWL Course nominations are now evaluated using the March 23, 2020 outcome language
    3. PWL Course Assessments will be evaluated using the March 23, 2020 language beginning with the 2020-2021 academic year. Some adjustments to assessment plans may be required. BSS assessments submitted before May 15, 2020 should be completed using the language that was in effect at the beginning of the 2019 academic year. Feedback will be provided relative to the March 23, 2020 language to guide assessment plans for the next evaluation cycle.

Questions about the new language and implementation timeline should be directed to the UCC Leadership.

 

Old Language New Language

Human Cultures – Humanities

• Discuss history and the basic
principles and operation of government with a view to being a responsible citizen.
• Discuss economic, social, and cultural diversity within a global context.
• Describe the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence individuals and groups.
• Explain the perspective of the culture of another country through the study of world languages, arts,
spiritual traditions, mythology/literature, and/or through study abroad.
Humanities: Includes content in classics, history, languages, the law, literature, the performing arts,
philosophy (including ethics), religion, and visual arts.

Human Cultures – Humanities

1. Recognize and describe humanistic, historical, or
artistic works or problems and patterns of the human
experience.
2. Apply disciplinary methodologies, epistemologies,
and traditions of the humanities and the arts.
3. Analyze and evaluate texts, works, objects, events,
or ideas in their cultural, intellectual, or historical
contexts.
4. Create, interpret, or reinterpret artistic and/or
humanistic works through performance, analysis, or
criticism.
5. Analyze diverse narratives and evidence in order to
explore the complexity of human experience across
space and time.
6. Describe the history, literature, languages, arts,
philosophy, religion, or traditions of other world
cultures.
7. Identify the history and the basic principles and
operation of government in the United States or other
countries.
*At least 4 of these 7 outcomes must be met for a
course to be approved to meet the Humanities
Outcome
*A course may be approved to meet either the
Behavioral and Social Sciences outcome OR the
Humanities outcome, but not both

Human Cultures – Behavioral and
Social Sciences
• Discuss history and the basic
principles and operation of government with a view to being a responsible citizen.
• Discuss economic, social, and cultural diversity within a global context.
• Describe the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence individuals and groups.
• Explain the perspective of the culture of another country through the study of world languages, arts,
spiritual traditions, mythology/literature, and/or
through study abroad.
• Behavioral/Social Sciences:
Includes content in anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, organization theory, sociology, economics, history, counseling, political science.
Human Cultures – Behavioral and Social Sciences
1. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts,
theoretical perspectives, empirical patterns, and/or
historical contexts within a given social or behavioral
domain
2. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of contending
explanations or interpretations for social, behavioral,
or historical phenomena
3. Demonstrate literacy in social, behavioral, or historical
research methods and analyses
4. Recognize relevant evidence supporting conclusions
about the behavior of individuals, groups, institutions,
or organizations
5. Recognize the extent and impact of diversity among
individuals, cultures, or societies in contemporary or
historical contexts
6. Identify examples of how social, behavioral, or
historical knowledge informs and can shape personal,
civic, ethical, or global decisions and responsibilities
*At least 4 of these 6 outcomes must be met for a
course to be approved to meet the Behavioral and
Social Sciences Outcome
*A course may be approved to meet either the
Behavioral and Social Sciences outcome OR the
Humanities outcome, but not both
Information literacy is the ability to recognize the extent and nature of information need, then to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the needed information. It involves designing, evaluating and implementing a strategy to answer questions or achieve a desired goal.
Key Skills:
• Determine the extent of information needed (define the research question, determine key concepts and types of information needed)
• Access information using effective, well designed  research strategies and relevant information sources.
• Evaluate information and its sources critically (analyzes assumptions and evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position)
• Communicate, organize and synthesize information from several sources.
• Access and use information ethically and legally (citations and references; paraphrasing, summary, or quoting; distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution)
• Propose a solution/hypothesis that indicates comprehension of the problem and is sensitive to contextual factors as well as the ethical, logical, or cultural dimensions of the problem.
• Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published, confidential, and/or proprietary information.
Information Literacy is the ability to accurately
and ethically use information, including
locating, evaluating, and synthesizing
information, to pursue a line of inquiry.
Key skills:
1. Identify a line of inquiry that requires
information, including formulating questions and
determining the scope of the investigation.
2. Locate information using effective search
strategies and relevant information sources.
3. Evaluate the credibility of information.
4. Synthesize and organize information from
different sources in order to communicate.
5. Attribute original ideas of others through
proper citing, referencing, paraphrasing,
summarizing, and quoting.
6. Recognize relevant cultural and other
contextual factors when using information.
7. Observe ethical and legal guidelines and
requirements for the use of published,
confidential, and/or proprietary information.
*All of the key skills must be met for a course
to meet the Information Literacy outcome
Science, Technology and Society: the ability to understand and apply basic scientific, quantitative, and technological content knowledge.
Key Skills:
• Understand and reflect upon the complex issues  raised by technological and scientific changes and its effects on society and the global world by making
sense of, evaluating, and responding to present and future changes that shape individuals’ work, public, and personal lives. Courses meeting this content area
may focus on issues such as global warming; biotechnology; GMO foods; and computing and information science as it relates to security, privacy, and the proliferation of global information. Consideration should be given to scientific and technological changes from fields such as agriculture,
computer science, engineering, education, health sciences, etc.
Science, Technology, and Society
1. Discuss examples of scientific and/or technological
changes and the costs and benefits for individuals and
specific societies.
2. Describe ethical implications of technological and/or
scientific developments.
3. Explain how social factors have shaped the
development or application of science and/or
technology, including tools and strategies by which
societies promote, constrain, or otherwise influence
scientific and/or technical innovation.
*Societal context under consideration may be past,
present and/or future
**All of the outcomes must be met for a course to meet
the Science, Technology, and Society outcome
Written Communication -- clear expression of ideas in writing; includes grammar, organization, and structure. Varying levels and types of writing skills are required for different jobs. The ability to convey ideas concisely and coherently is important.
Key skills:
• Demonstrates understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned
task(s) and focuses on all elements of the work.
• Uses appropriate and relevant content to explore ideas and/or demonstrate mastery of the subject, conveying the writer’s understanding, and shaping the work.
• Demonstrates attention to and successful execution of organization, content, presentation, format and stylistic choices in writing.
• Demonstrates use of credible, relevant resources to support ideas that are situated within the discipline and genre of writing.
• Uses language that effectively communicates meaning to readers with clarity and fluency.
Written Communication -- clear expression of ideas in
writing; includes grammar, organization, and structure.
Varying levels and types of writing skills are required
for different jobs. The ability to convey ideas concisely
and coherently is important.
Key skills:
1. Produce texts that use appropriate formats, genre
conventions, and documentation styles while
controlling tone, syntax, grammar, and spelling.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of writing as a social
process that includes multiple drafts, collaboration,
feedback, and reflection.
3. Examine critically, summarize, apply, analyze, and
synthesize information as the basis for developing
original ideas and claims.
4. Develop, assert and support a focused thesis with
appropriate reasoning and adequate evidence.
5. Compose texts that exhibit appropriate rhetorical
choices, which include attention to audience, purpose,
context, genre, and convention.
6. Demonstrate proficiency in identifying, reading,
evaluating, analyzing, and using reliable sources.
*All of the key skills must be met for a course to
meet the Written Communication outcome

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