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Free Team Creation and Evaluation Tool_CATME

By in Software, Tools on .

CATME Logo

 

CATME(http://info.catme.org) is a system of secure, web-based tools that enable instructors to implement best practices in managing student teams. It has two modules. First, CATME Team-Maker is designed for automating the assignment of students to teams to meet weighted criteria set by the instructor. Second, CATME Peer Evaluation is designed for the creation, administration,  and evaluation of student self- and peer-evaluations using a behaviorally-anchored rating scale.

The CATME project began in 2003 with the development of an instrument for self and peer evaluation called the Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness.  Initially, CATME was NSF funded and  the result of the collaborative efforts of researchers from multiple higher education institutions. Professor Matthew Ohland in Engineering Education at Purdue University was the Principal Investigator.

It is a free tool and the user base has been up to 300,000 students of 6,000 faculty/staff at 1100 institutions in 61 countries. There are around 100 faculty on campus who have signed up for instructor accounts. For more information about CATME, please request a consultation at tlt-consulting@purdue.edu.

 

Using Mobile Device Logic and Tracking in Qualtrics Surveys

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By in Distance Education, Mobile, Software, Tools, Training, Uncategorized on .

Qualtrics online survey software, provided to faculty, staff and students at Purdue, is providing more options for mobile device display choices and tracking. We often want to know these days whether someone is accessing our survey from a mobile device or perhaps ask questions that are specific to a particular device being used to complete the survey.  Qualtrics allows you do both of these actions.

If you have a survey that contains questions pertaining to specific access, either desktop or mobile; use Display Logic for those questions and select Device Type conditions.

How ? image

  • Select the question that you want to add a display condition to and use the drop-down box to select Display Logic
Display Logic Choice on a Question

Display Logic Choice on a Question

  • In the Display Logic dialog box, select the first condition to be Device Type.
  • Select your Device Type from the drop-down choices.
Device Type condition box

Device Type condition box

  • The logic confirmation box will appear on the top of the question with your selections.
Display Logic Confirmation box

Display Logic Confirmation box

  • This logic for Device Type display may be used in the Survey Flow structure as well.

Additionally, you may want to track what type of device is being used to complete the your survey. Qualtrics allows this tracking by providing a hidden Meta Info question that you may create and insert anywhere in your survey. That question will provide data back to you regarding the browser and operating system used to complete the survey. Since the user never sees this question, you may insert it near the beginning of the survey.

The following fields are available for tracking/reporting as a table in your report or in the downloaded data set: Browser, Version, Operating System, Screen Resolution, JavaScript Support, and User Agent. (User Agent contains the data string for the question. If you forget to add the hidden Meta Info question before you launch your survey, you may add it later using an embedded data field to the Survey Flow area; which is called “UserAgent“.)

How ? image

  •  Add the Meta Info question, by selecting Create a New Item and then Meta Info Question
Meta Info Question Type Selection

Meta Info Question Type Selection

  •  The following image shows the question as it displays within your survey in Qualtrics.
Meta Info Question Box

Meta Info Question Box

Checking Your Qualtrics Survey Display on a Mobile Device

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By in Distance Education, Mobile, Software, Tools, Training, Uncategorized on .

Since mobile devices are often the access point for email, it’s logical to assume that someone might view your survey link on a mobile device. Checking to see if your questions will display properly is an easy thing to do.

First you should know that Qualtrics surveys are built to be “adaptive” to a device’s screen size and type. The devices that are recommended as compatible, include Android, iOS, and Windows Phone systems. Secondly, while all surveys are set up to be adaptive, be aware that some questions may not display well because they are too wide in their format. So, it’s useful to check your survey questions with the Mobile Compatibility Advisor in Qualtrics.

To use the Mobile Compatibility Advisor, from the edit mode on your survey:

How ? image

  • Click on Advanced Options and then select Mobile Compatibility Advisor. The Advanced Options tab is in the upper right of your screen.
Mobile_Compatibility_Advisor button

Advanced Options tab showing Mobile Compatibility Advisor

  • In the survey, small mobile icons appear to the left of any question box that might have a display concern. You can click on the icon and read the display issue message. An orange icon means the question might wrap or display poorly due to the length of the answer choices.  A red icon means that question format will not display consistently on mobile devices or may not display at all on a mobile device. In either case, you may adjust your question format and run the advisor again to recheck the survey before sending it out or posting the link.
Example of a Red Mobile Icon Image

Example of a Red Mobile Icon

Confluence as an Alternative Learning Management System

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By in Content Development, Software, Tools on .

Recently, a faculty member commented to one of my colleagues and I that Blackboard was simply “too much” for things he wanted to do within his course.  That got me thinking as to why someone might consider Blackboard Learn to be a tool that might be excessive for specific needs.

Blackboard Learn offers to faculty a rich set of tools – but what happens when a faculty member does not want to use the clear majority of those tools?  What if a faculty member only wants a place to place their syllabus and course schedule, content for students to read, upload an occasional video, and so forth?  Does a faculty member have an option for a simpler way to get course content to students at Purdue?

The answer is yes – the Confluence Wiki.

While it might seem odd that a wiki could be an alterative to Blackboard, the Confluence Wiki can perform many of the same functions for faculty that a traditional LMS would be able to provide.  Confluence offers the following for faculty:

  • On-Demand Course Creation:  Unlike Blackboard, where course sites are created automatically, faculty may create their course’s space (site) in Confluence on demand by using the Space Creation application located at http://www.purdue.edu/apps/Confluence.  This will automatically create a space on Confluence for the class and enroll all students and instructors in the class into the newly created Confluence space.
    Confluence Space Creation Application
  • Automatic Enrollment Management:  When a space is created using our Space Creation application, as noted before all students and instructors will be added to the newly created space.  In addition, as students add or drop the class, those changes are reflected in the Confluence space.
  • Content Management:  Faculty can easily upload documents and images to Confluence, and then quickly replace those documents with up-to-date versions.  For example, if the course syllabus changes, a new syllabus can be uploaded and replace the existing file.  Additionally, web links to other sites and to multimedia may also be included in Confluence.
  • Flexibility:  A Confluence space can be very simple (one or two pages with all the content needed) to highly complex, depending on needs.
  • Privacy:  Academic spaces in Confluence are only accessible to those enrolled in the course; they are not accessible by the public.

There are a few features Confluence does not have that is important to note.  First, Confluence does not offer integrated homework submission and quizzes/exams, like Blackboard.  Faculty who want to offer online exams (such as pre- or post- assessments) would be able to use Qualtrics and survey panels within the Qualtrics tool to control assessment delivery.

Also, Confluence does not offer an electronic gradebook, which would require students to track their own grades.  Additionally, while Confluence does offer the ability for students to comment on pages, there is no threaded discussion board available like what is available in Blackboard.

One other concern would be that if Confluence is used instead of Blackboard Learn, students will need to be directed to Confluence to access course content.  In this case it is recommended that any instructor using Confluence provide directions to students in class on how to access the Confluence site and make the site a favorite, so the site is quickly accessible after login.

Although there are these concerns, the Confluence Wiki does provide a great amount of flexibility on how the online portion of a course can be set up.  As much (or as little) information can be made available to students as desired.

While Blackboard Learn has many tools that faculty may wish to use in their teaching, there may be a desire for something that simply does not do everything that Blackboard can do, and that’s where Confluence can assist.  An example “course” in Confluence has been created at https://wiki.itap.purdue.edu/display/confcourse/Confluence+for+Courses+Demonstration+Home to provide some ideas on how Confluence may be used as an alternative to Blackboard.

Confluence for Courses example homepage  example course schedule in confluence

For more information about using Confluence as an alternative to Blackboard, or adding wikis to your course, please contact us at tlt-consulting@purdue.edu.

Brett Creech
Educational Technologist