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Thoughts on Adding Technology to Blend Courses

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By in Content Development, Course Redesign, IMPACT, Musings on Technology on .

This Spring, I made a decision to enroll in a Blended Learning course sponsored by EDUCAUSE called “Becoming a Blended Learning Designer”. This MOOC requires participants to complete the course in six weeks, and during that time participate in discussions, blogging, and readings.

As I went through the readings for the first week of the class, two lines stuck out to me:

“Blended learning is not simply adding an online component to a face-to-face course.  Technology in a course should be used wisely – to facilitate student learning.”  (Thompson, 2015, p. 7)

I’ve seen cases all too often where faculty members try to add technology in to the course because they’re trying to meet a need.  They know they should be adding technology but they’re looking to add something that may not always be the most practical or the most appropriate for their class.  Some instructors I have worked with have looked to using the LMS to replace in-class quizzes, for example.  Great idea in theory, but they were not prepared for some of the variables:

  • Students trying to use smartphones or tablets to take the quiz (when the LMS doesn’t necessarily support this well)
  • Students taking the quiz with other students
  • Students using their notes/books for the quiz

The instructors in these cases were thinking it would be simple to replace their low-stakes quizzes with ones that could simply be taken online. But they wanted a full replication of the in-class experience, one that mitigated “cheating” (or as some prefer to call it, “collaboration”).

For me the first part of a blended learning course is determining which parts should go online, and which should not.  It should be a careful, deliberate process that seeks to allow technology to assist in teaching, not trying to force technology into a role that faculty may regret later.

If you are looking to redevelop your class, consider applying for the IMPACT program by visiting http://www.purdue.edu/impact. If you know what tools you want to use and need help getting those tools integrated into your class, contact us at tlt-consulting@purdue.edu.

Brett Creech
Educational Technologist

Citations:

Thompson, K. (ed.). (2015).  BlendKit Reader (2nd Ed.).  Retrieved from https://blended.online.ucf.edu/blendkit-course-blendkit-reader-chapter-1/

How is Student-Centered Instruction Different than Traditional Instruction?

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By in Classroom, Content Development, Course Redesign, IMPACT, Professional Development, Uncategorized on .

Student-centered learning looks at where students are when they enter the classroom and attempts to customize teaching to allow students some freedom in choosing how to learn. This kind of teaching allows instructors to free themselves from the traditional lecture and allows them to change the learning space to one that best fits the needs of the student. Students are led to what they need to know instead of listening to someone tell them and they can become actively engaged in their learning.

What has been for some, a liberating style of teaching and learning, frees instructors by allowing them to lead the adventure instead of dispensing it. It is not unusual for instructors to struggle with the transition in the beginning and many feel as if they are giving up some control, which is not inaccurate. However, giving up some control allows students to become actively engaged. Learning can reach new heights without limit. More focus is often put on the quality of students questions instead of the quality of their answers. Higher order thinking skills are engaged since students are able to keep moving towards a goal, work together, ask questions and build on what they know. According to John Dewey in his book entitled How We Think, he notes deep thinking takes time and cannot be expected to happen when prompt answers are required (Dewey,1910). Student-centered learning allows students to make those higher order connections by giving students time to explore and be actively involved in their learning.

This change in the dynamic of the classroom can often intimidate those new to the process, but I liken it to a typical lab experience often seen as a normal part of many lecture courses. That shift instructors feel when they go from lecture-based courses to a lab class is the shift they are referring to in student-centered instruction, switching from dispenser to facilitator and learners going from passive to active learning. Most of the instructor’s work happens before the lab begins with perhaps a pre-lab, setting up the equipment, making sure students stay on task by outlining lab report requirements and having students turn in documentation showing what they have done. This is student-centered learning. The instructor set up the experience and then sits back and let them experience it. There is no lecturing during a lab, yet students learn. Learning through active engagement helps students better relate what they are doing to what they already know resulting in higher levels of retention and comprehension (Angelo & Cross, 1993).

Although not a new concept, some may struggle with the shift to the student-centered approach. Taking this familiar concept and applying it to the lecture part of a course is something many might find foreign. Many others have found it worth their time in making the transformation in everything they teach because many students are more engaged and respond much better to being an active participant in their learning. Other students though who were counting on putting in seat time for another lecture series while chatting on their phone, napping or doing other things have been found to resist the expectation they engage.  Each instructor needs to decide what is best for their learners, but keep in mind there is no one right way to create a student-centered environment. Your subject material, student population, and personal comfort level should all be taken into consideration.

The IMPACT Program at Purdue University provides resources and support for instructors to redesign their course in a student-centered way. The comfort level of the faculty member is of utmost importance and nothing is imposed without the instructor initiating the desire for change.

On April 10th, IMPACT will be hosting Eric Mazur who will be talking about how he transformed his course from lecture to student-centered. Faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend.

 

References

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers.

Dewey, J. (1910). How We Think. New York: D.C. Heath & CO.

Related Links and Articles:

http://www.purdue.edu/impact/

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/4-principles-student-centered-learning/

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/10-tools-student-centered-creative-expression/

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/learner-centered-pedagogy-fear-losing-control/

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/metacognition-50-questions-help-students-think-think/

Flipping With Interactive Video Through TED-Ed

By in Uncategorized on .

Flipping the classroom requires students to gather information outside of class, generally through reading or watching recorded lectures. As flipping the classroom gains momentum, instructors are increasingly looking for ways to engage students in online content so that students will be prepared and ready to participate in class. The material presented must not only provide the necessary background information for the classroom activity, but it must interest the students as well so that they actually engage with it. After all, the flipped classroom model doesn’t work if the students don’t come to class prepared with the knowledge they’ll need to participate.

Video is a popular method of presenting content online, and TED-Ed is offering a way to turn TED Talks and YouTube videos into an interactive teaching opportunity. TED-Ed Lessons provide pre-made interactive videos, with the added advantage of allowing the instructor the ability to modify them to fit their own teaching style. Instructors can also create their own interactive videos using a video from YouTube.

These interactive videos turn passive video watching into an active learning experience. The videos can contain multiple choice and open-ended questions, connect to a class discussion, and link to additional information. With good questions and supplemental materials for further exploration, these interactive videos can encourage higher level thinking skills, which will increase the chance that students will be ready to actively engage in the flipped classroom.

The multiple choice questions are automatically graded, so students are provided immediate feedback. Students then have the opportunity to retry any questions they answer incorrectly. Instructors can also offer a video hint, which allows students to review the video before retrying the question, and may discourage guessing. Open-ended questions are sent to the instructor to review.

There are two options for obtaining interactive videos from TED-Ed:

OPTION 1: Find a pre-made interactive video

TED ed lessons

To find appropriate interactive videos, the instructor can filter by content (TED originals, TED Talk Lessons, and TED-Ed Selects), student level (elementary through college and beyond), and duration (3-18 minutes). These videos are also grouped by topics (arts, mathematics, science & technology, etc.) and series (inventions that shape history, how things work, math in real life, etc.).

OPTION 2: Create your own interactive video

TED ed videos

Instructors can also create their own interactive videos using any TED Talk video or YouTube video. These interactive videos provide options like Watch (view the video), Think (create multiple choice and/or open-ended questions), Dig Deeper (add related content for students to explore), Discuss (create a discussion), and And Finally(provide closing thoughts or something to ponder to add closure to the lesson). This last option, And Finally, could also be used as the preparation for the class lesson that follows. The instructor can delete any of these functions, except watch. Once the video is finished, the instructor simply shares the URL with his or her students. The instructor can choose to keep the lessons private or distribute them publicly and can choose whether to allow others to customize the lesson.

Some considerations:

A user must create an account to generate lessons and to participate in the interactive aspects of the video. Users must be thirteen to create an account. Lessons viewed, lessons started, lessons completed, lesson drafts, and lessons created are tracked in the user’s account. Instructors can also track student activity, feedback from students, and feedback from educators. This feedback can allow instructors to revise their videos as necessary in order to ensure that they are meeting student needs.

TED-Ed is providing an interesting tool that may encourage student engagement outside of class and track student progress in one convenient package. It provides an active learning experience that encourages accountability through tracked student interaction. TED-Ed’s interactive videos may make flipping classrooms just a little bit easier and perhaps more interesting for the students.

Free Team Creation and Evaluation Tool_CATME

By in Software, Tools on .

CATME Logo

 

CATME(http://info.catme.org) is a system of secure, web-based tools that enable instructors to implement best practices in managing student teams. It has two modules. First, CATME Team-Maker is designed for automating the assignment of students to teams to meet weighted criteria set by the instructor. Second, CATME Peer Evaluation is designed for the creation, administration,  and evaluation of student self- and peer-evaluations using a behaviorally-anchored rating scale.

The CATME project began in 2003 with the development of an instrument for self and peer evaluation called the Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness.  Initially, CATME was NSF funded and  the result of the collaborative efforts of researchers from multiple higher education institutions. Professor Matthew Ohland in Engineering Education at Purdue University was the Principal Investigator.

It is a free tool and the user base has been up to 300,000 students of 6,000 faculty/staff at 1100 institutions in 61 countries. There are around 100 faculty on campus who have signed up for instructor accounts. For more information about CATME, please request a consultation at tlt-consulting@purdue.edu.