Human Resources Mission, Vision, and Strategic Goals For You

Assessment Process to Protect those Most Vulnerable

Note: Faculty and staff who are working remotely or have everything they need to protect them on campus are not required to initiate an assessment.

With the goal of protecting the Purdue community from exposure to COVID-19, the Protect Purdue implementation team has announced the plan for identifying those who are most vulnerable to serious illness and the process for making accommodations to provide a safe working environment. Purdue’s Board of Trustees endorsed this component of the Protect Purdue plan at its meeting on May 26.

  1. Self-assess your vulnerability category based on a list of known medical factors that if not well-controlled can lead to serious illness in an individual who contracts the COVID-19 virus.
Intake criteria
  1. Initiate the request for workplace adjustments and accommodations. Each campus has its own intake form. Click the link below to your respective campus to complete the intake form:
The form routes to Human Resources.

Human Resources will contact individuals to discuss their workplace, work assignments and potential adjustments/accommodations to reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure. Some examples include:
  • Remote work
  • Alternative work schedules
  • Specifically fitted personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Physical alterations to work station, office, or classroom environment
  1. The university recognizes that these adjustments might not be sufficient for all individuals. In those cases in which a particular individual needs more, Human Resources will work with the individual to obtain medical information and engage in a full interactive process under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This process will help the individual, HR and the employing department identify workplace accommodations, which could include a period of leave from work or job reassignment.

The goal of the adjustment and accommodation process is to enable faculty and staff to work as safely as possible.

Frequently Asked Questions

Employees who will be working on campus should self-assess and determine your risk level. Then, click the link to complete the Intake Form, which will route to Human Resources where it will be reviewed and  HR will contact the employee to begin discussions about potential adjustments or accommodations to your workplace environment.

You can initiate the process by completing the intake form for your campus.

Any faculty and staff, including graduate student staff and student employees, who believe they are medically vulnerable to serious illness and need additional assistance on campus.

Your safety is important. This process offers a procedure to put in place any necessary workplace adjustments or accommodations for those most vulnerable.

No faculty or staff member is required to complete the form. Many staff have been approved by their supervisor to work remotely and are able to do so through the end of the year. If you are an individual working remotely and you  need assistance regarding your remote work environment, please contact Human Resources for assistance. 

Faculty and staff who are working on campus and have everything they need to protect themselves on campus are not required to initiate an assessment.

The process is primarily designed to assist faculty and staff who have been asked to perform some or all of their work on campus to explore adjustments, accommodations or alternatives to those on-campus work assignments. 

Currently, the medical factors we believe you should consider are (updated August 6, 2020):

  • Active cancer treatment or hematological cancers
  • Age 65 and older
  • Auto immune disorders
  • Body mass index at or above 30 (updated from 40 to 30 August 6)
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic lung disease and COPD
  • Diabetes
  • Persistent asthma
  • Pregnancy
  • Serious heart conditions
  • Immunocompromised (weakened immune system) due to solid organ transplant (updated August 6)
  • Sickle Cell Disease (updated August 6)

Because the medical, scientific and public health communities are constantly learning more about the COVID-19 virus and its impacts, it is possible that the list of medical factors could change. Changes are determined by the CDC. Review CDC: Scientific Evidence for Conditions that Increase Risk for more information.

The CDC recommends several practical things that you can do to protect vulnerable family members from your own work activities. These practices include the basics associated with practicing good social distance practices, wearing a face mask, frequent hand-washing, and avoiding public transportation.  These and other practices can be found on the following CDC website.

If any part of your work must be performed on campus and you have a family member living with you who is vulnerable to a serious illness, we encourage you to review this guidance. Employees should discuss ways to further limit your contact with other individuals on campus or additional practical steps you can take at home to limit transmission. If you have further questions or concerns, employees should contact their HR business partner.

Only if the initial assessment and conversations about an array of workplace adjustments will not be sufficient to protect you. In those cases, you may be asked to submit a medical release form and undergo a more thorough process for an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation.

Each individual will be asked to self-assess their vulnerability level based on a list of known medical factors that if not well-controlled can lead to serious illness in an individual who contracts the COVID-19 virus.

You can initiate the process by completing the intake form for your campus.
Once employees have initiated the process, Human Resources will contact them to discuss their workplace, work assignments and potential adjustments to reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure.
Yes. After Human Resources and the employee have discussed workplace adjustments and potential workplace accommodations, the supervisor will be contacted to confirm the adjustments/accommodations are reasonable for the specific work environment.

No, if you have already spoken with either your supervisor or HR business partner and have made necessary workplace adjustments, you do not need to initiate this process.

Some examples of workplace adjustments include: 

  • Remote work
  • Alternative work schedules
  • Specifically fitted personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Physical alterations to work station, office, or classroom environment

The process is designed for Human Resources and the employee to work together to identify potential adjustments and accommodations.

In those cases in which a particular individual needs more, Human Resources will work with the individual to obtain medical information and engage in a full interactive process under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This process will help the individual, HR and the employing department identify workplace accommodations, which could include a period of leave from work or job reassignment.
Yes. The ADA accommodation process is a more formal process and will require medical documentation. The ADA administrator will work with the medical professional, employee, supervisor and others, in order to identify workplace accommodations that are effective for the employee and reasonable in the workplace.

There is currently no deadline for employees to initiate the process.

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a reasonable accommodation is assistance or change to the workplace that enables an employee to perform the essential functions of their job.
The initial assessment process is designed to not require specific medical information; it only requires individuals to identify themselves on a 1-to-5 scale, with “1” signifying the most medically vulnerable. The information provided will be used to begin discussions with HR and to help determine what workplace adjustments can be put in place in order to enable the faculty or staff member to work safely on campus.
No. Your self-assessment and any medical documentation that is collected by Human Resources are confidential under the ADA. This information will be stored securely and separately from any other employee files. The extent and nature of your medical information will NOT be shared with your manager or employing unit.

Please contact The Purdue COVID-19 Information Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or toll-free at 1-833-571-1043, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Faculty and staff may seek confidential and professional mental health resources through Center for Healthy Living’s Employee Assistance Program. More information is found here.  Additional mental health and stress resources available to faculty and staff can be found here.