163 Search Result(s) For "pruning"


Growing Grapes (HO-45-W)

Purdue Extension Publication

This publication discusses the grape plant, site and cultivar selection, vineyard establishment and management, and pest control. Two tables provide information on the grape cultivars for Indiana and suggested pruning for various grape cultivars on single curtain training systems. Illustrations are given showing the USDA Hardiness Zone map for Indiana, the proper pruning and training of vines from planting through the fourth and subsequent years, and the Umbrella kniffin, Bilateral cordon, Geneva double curtain, and cold-tender cultivar training systems.


Currants and Gooseberries (HO-17-W)

Purdue Extension Publication

This publication discusses the cultural requirements, cultivars, soil preparation, planting, weed control, fertilizing, pest control, pruning, and harvesting for currants and gooseberries.


Growing Cherries in Indiana (HO-9-W)

Purdue Extension Publication

This publication discusses site selection, planting, training, cultural practices, cultivars, and disease and insect control associated with growing cherry trees in Indiana. Illustrations on proper branch removal and pruning are included.


Effects of Cold Weather on Horticultural Plants in Indiana (HO-203-W)

Purdue Extension Publication

This publication identifies the types of injury caused by cold weather, the factors that influence the degree of injury, and ways to prevent or reduce injury. Tables are included listing the symptoms of freezing injury on some vegetables, frost resistance of annual flowers, floral development stages for fruit crops, critical temperatures for flower bud kill, critical temperatures and cold injury evaluations for small fruit crops, application precipitation rates, and row covers and frost protection. An illustration is also included showing the USDA hardiness zones of the United States.



Large wounds in tuliptrees not likely to heal

Large wounds in tuliptrees not likely to heal Q) I’ve attached a photo of one of my trees. I’m concerned that the tree will not heal, and if it does will be too weakened. Also, you gave me a contact for a state arborist last time we visited. I have lost that info. – G.F., Jeffersonville, Indiana A) Looks like perhaps this was storm-related damage? Tuliptrees are somewhat weak-wooded and can be susceptible to limb […]


When Tree Roots Surface

Much to the dismay of homeowners, landscape trees sometimes grow roots on top of the surface of the lawn or possibly even buckle sidewalks and driveways. These surface roots can be quite a nuisance to lawn mowers and human feet. There are several reasons why the roots come to the surface. Some tree species are more prone to surface roots than others, most notably silver maple, poplar and willow. But almost any large, older tree […]


The Purple Landscape

Trees and shrubs with colorful foliage can add a steady supply of interest in the landscape throughout the growing season. Purple foliage is quite popular among plant breeders and garden enthusiasts.  Here’s a look at some possibilities to consider. Small to Medium Trees Japanese Maple – There are many cultivars available in the trade. Some have purple foliage all summer while others may be purple only in spring and/or autumn. Redbud “Forest Pansy” – This […]


Some Shrubs Best Pruned After Flowering

Although late winter is generally the ideal time for pruning chores, many of our spring-blooming shrubs are best pruned immediately after flowers have faded. Trees and shrubs that bloom in early spring, such as forsythia, lilac, honeysuckle, quince and spirea, set their flower buds the previous fall, referred to as “flowering on old wood.” If you prune in late winter, some or all of the bloom potential for spring is sacrificed. By waiting until after […]


Some Shrubs Best Pruned After Flowering

Although late winter is generally the ideal time for pruning chores, many of our spring-blooming shrubs are best pruned immediately after flowers have faded. Trees and shrubs that bloom in early spring, such as forsythia, lilac, honeysuckle, quince and spirea, set their flower buds the previous fall, referred to as “flowering on old wood.” If you prune in late winter, some or all of the bloom potential for spring is sacrificed. By waiting until after […]


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