The Robert L. Ringel Research Symposium

Thursday, March 4th, 4:00-6:00 pm

Event Materials 

Click here to download the presenter list & titles

Click here to download the event brochure with poster information for all presenters.

  • Each presenter will have their own personal Zoom link. Links are listed below with their poster information.
  • During the live event, event attendees can simply move in and out of the poster sessions via the unique Zoom links.  Please pay attention to the group times as the individual presenters will only be available during their specified group time.


***To quickly jump to specific poster information (abstract, poster,  & Zoom link) simply click on the presenter's name and you will be taken directly to their information. You can also just scroll down to browse posters.

Group #1 4:00-5:00pm Group #2 5:00-6:00pm
Albertine, Madeline Ann Schutter, Brittany Nicole
Donenfeld-Peled, Inbal Thompson, Alleah
LoPrinzi, Danielle Faith Cox, Briana
Pentecost, Megan Bolte, Katherine Rose
Hagaman, Jamie L Sheehan, Caroline
Scheri, Ryan Shaffer, Jennifer
Mauntler, Meghan Lynn Hake, Delaney
Monteith, Lauren Oakes, Breanna
Nash, Catherine P Eapen, Amy Elaine
Casson, Emily Reitz, Allison
Lowe, Avia A Wade, Kristen
Mok, Brittany Maesaka, Claire R
Childers, Anne L Bower, Kathryn E
Clements, Nicole C Moore, Cecilia
Collignon, Madison L Rogers, Kelly
James, Laura K Slagel, McKaylee
Madden, Caitlin R Underwood, Isabella

ASHA CEU Requirement Reminder:

DISREGARD IF YOU ARE NOT COLLECTING CEUs

  1. Check in to the event live (March 4th between 4:00pm-6:00pm). Check in using this link:https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4ZrwjE697XEe6x0
  2. Virtually visit the poster sessions
  3. Submit your completed “Record of Sessions Attended” electronic form.  (Sent via email after you "Check in" during the event). This form will be due March 5th, 2021 by 4pm!

Poster Information and Zoom Links

Presentation Group 1  4:00-5:00 pm

Effect of Spaced Retrieval Training on Activities of Daily Living in Alzheimer’s Disease

Madeline Albertine

View Poster Here

Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/my/malberti

Abstract: For persons with Alzheimer’s type dementia (AD), what is the effect of Spaced Retrieval Training (SRT) on performance of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)? This project reviewed the effectiveness of SRT for people with AD in learning new or forgotten information essential to completing various ADLs independently. The review suggested that SRT is an effective clinical approach to teach people with AD new or forgotten skills related to completing ADLs. Completing ADLs can lead to increased independence for persons with AD, as well as decreased caregiver burden.  

Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of reading this poster, the participant will be able to define Activities of Daily Living and list the five primary ADLs.
  2. As a result of reading this poster, the participant will be able to describe the effect of dementia on Activities of Daily Living.
  3. As a result of reading this poster, the participant will be able to describe the process of applying Spaced Retrieval Training in therapy.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate research assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

The Effects of Communication Partner Training on Aphasia Severity and Expressive Language Outcome Measures in Persons with Aphasia

Inbal Donenfeld-Peled

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/5381222889

Abstract: Unlike traditional therapy approaches to aphasia, Communication Partner Training (CPT) provides direct intervention to the communication partner (CP) or the dyad (persons with aphasia (PWA) and CP). This project reviews whether CPT yields a significant improvement in aphasia severity and expressive language skills in PWA, with the goal of providing insight on how CPT can be incorporated with traditional therapy. The review revealed significant gains from CPT across measures and limited generalization from traditional therapy. These data suggest that CPT can be combined with traditional therapy to boost treatment outcome measures in PWA.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. List 3 limitations of traditional therapy and 3 strengths of CPT.
  2. Compare and contrast the goals of CPT and traditional therapy approaches.
  3. List 3 main characteristics of combined CPT and traditional therapy for PWA

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Influence of gesturing therapy on word-retrieval abilities in individuals with aphasia

Danielle Hoffmeister (LoPrinzi)

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Zoom Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6483549355?pwd=L0ZUTEVqM3dBY0U0RDcwYzhtZnRTZz09

Abstract: How does the implementation of gesturing therapy influence word-retrieval abilities in individuals with aphasia? Secondly, does the benefit of gesturing therapy outweigh that of naming therapy? Thirdly, does the combination of gesturing therapy with naming therapy add a perceived benefit compared to naming therapy alone? This project critically analyzed the effectiveness of gesturing treatments on language rehabilitation in individuals with aphasia. Results indicated that while naming therapy has been found to improve word retrieval in those with aphasia, gesturing therapy alone is ineffective. These findings suggest that the implementation of gesturing therapy alone is not sufficient for improving word-retrieval in people with aphasia but may be suitable as a supplemental approach, given what is known about the relationship between gestures and language. More research is needed.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to describe the relationship between gesturing and language.
  2. Participant will be able to identify a hallmark language feature of aphasia.
  3. Participant will be able to discern the influence of gesturing therapy on word-retrieval abilities in people with aphasia. 

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Intervention Approaches to Acquired Phonological Alexia and Agraphia in Stroke Patients

Megan Pentecost

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/my/mpenteco

Abstract: Is treating reading and writing concurrently more effective for adults with acquired phonological alexia and agraphia than treating the modalities independently? Are outcomes favorable when the modalities are treated by a repetition-based intervention or a phonological processes-based intervention? This review compared outcome measures of standardized and non-standardized testing for combinations of these treatment approaches. While all treatment combinations showed improvements, evidence from maintenance and generalization measures indicate that a phonological processes approach is the most effective, regardless of if the treatment is applied to the modalities independently or separately. This indicates that clinicians should prioritize intervention focused on grapheme-phoneme correspondences in clients with acquired phonological alexia and agraphia. 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe different treatment approaches to phonological alexia and agraphia.
  2. Summarize evaluation of phonological alexia and agraphia
  3. Implement appropriate therapy techniques with clients

Financial Disclosures: Chappelle Fellowship recipient with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Family Impact and Health Related Quality of Life in Families of Children with Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders

Jamie Hagaman

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/8785984204

Abstract: This review investigated changes in health related quality of life (HRQoL) of families when implementing the Feeding/Swallowing Impact Survey (FS-IS) to identify and address the family impact of caring for a child with a feeding/swallowing disorder. Evidence from the field of speech-language pathology and related health care professions was synthesized to determine if measuring and treating family impact improves HRQoL outcomes. The FS-IS was determined to be a valid assessment of family impact and intervention studies suggest that treating it can lead to improvements in HRQoL.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the Feeding/Swallowing Impact Survey and list the three caregiver reported outcome domains it assesses.
  2. Summarize the importance of assessment and treatment of family impact in improving health related quality of life of families.
  3. List two delivery models to address family impact of caring for a child with a pediatric feeding/swallowing disorder.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

The Influence of Pitch and Resonance in Gender-Affirming Voice Therapy

Ryan Scheri

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/my/rscheri

Abstract: To what extent do pitch and resonance contribute to the perception of communication femininity in transfeminine individuals? This project compared literature to evaluate if pitch or resonance contributed more to an outside listener’s perception of gender. The review suggested that both pitch and resonance are vital for the perception of feminine communication. However, clients need to be involved in the development of the intervention plan to ensure therapy outcomes meet the client’s individual goal to create a gender congruent voice and communication style.  

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Summarize core concepts contributing to the perception of a feminine gender
  2. Describe the importance of pitch and resonance to gender-affirming voice therapy
  3. Summarize how pitch and resonance should be included in a gender-affirming voice therapy intervention plan

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

The Impact of Hearing Aids on Cognition in Older Adults with Age-Related Hearing Loss

Meghan Mauntler

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/6844344418?pwd=aVpCYVFTRVJwNEU0OUROM2prZFdqQT09

Abstract: Does the use of hearing aids maintain or improve cognitive function in older adults with clinical hearing loss? This project compared trends in cognitive function overtime in adults with hearing loss who acquired hearing aids and those who did not. The review suggested that hearing aid use contributed to cognitive maintenance and/or improvement in domains such as memory, attention, and processing speed. Additionally, increased frequency of hearing aid use was associated with greater cognitive functioning. These findings indicate that hearing aids are an effective intervention to improve cognition in older adults with clinical hearing loss. The findings also help bolster the information-degradation hypothesis, which suggests that degraded sensory input may negatively impact cognitive function.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Summarize the common cause hypothesis and the information-degradation hypothesis.
  2. Determine three characteristics of individuals who could benefit from use of the intervention to maintain or improve cognitive function.
  3. Identify two best practice recommendations regarding use of the intervention to maintain or improve cognitive function.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

The Development of a Practical Baseline Vestibular Testing Protocol for Youths at Risk for Concussion

Lauren Monteith

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/97337671896

Abstract: The present study aims to determine which vestibular tests are most cost and time effective when developing a baseline test battery for identifying concussion in at-risk youths. A detailed review of existing literature revealed 4 vestibular tests that frequently identified abnormal results in individuals with concussion: the Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Gaze-Stability Test (GST), Near Point Convergence Test (NPC), and oculomotor assessments with infrared goggles. However, external factors such as equipment and administration costs of the SOT and formal oculormotor testing suggest that substituting the Vestibular/Oculor-Motor Screening (VOMS) assessment and the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) for the would serve as a more viable baseline assessment option for children with a suspected head injury.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Define concussion and the prevalence of vestibular involvement following head injury, recognizing the vestibular symptoms most commonly reported by patients.
  2. Describe the significance of the Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Gaze-Stability Test (GST), Near Point Convergence Test (NPC), and oculomotor assessments and recognize each tests’ contributions to detecting vestibular abnormalities following a concussion.
  3. Compare and contrast the use of the SOT and oculormotor testing with goggles to the Vestibular/Oculor-Motor Screening (VOMS) assessment and the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), and recognize situations in which screening tools should be used in the place of formal diagnostic examination.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Identifying Vestibular Impairments in Cochlear Implant Patients

Catherine Nash

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/6155290406

Abstract: Approximately 30% to 60% of cochlear implant patients are at risk for experiencing dizziness post-implantation. A review of the literature identified both objective and subjective test measures in order to determine if a standardized protocol should be implemented for patients experiencing long-term symptoms. Due to the variation in results, studies suggest that the most effective strategy to identify and treat these patients would be on a case-by-case basis. To ensure that cochlear implant patients are being properly monitored for vestibular impairment, screening questions related to vestibular symptoms should be administered at regular intervals post-implantation. Implementing a screening process may help identify these patients, however each case must be treated independently.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participant will be able to describe vestibular dysfunction within the cochlear implant population and why it is difficult to identify.
  2. The participant will be able to summarize the benefits of case-by-case approach for cochlear implant patients with vestibular symptoms.
  3. The participant will be able to connect the importance of utilizing a screening tool to identify symptomatic versus asymptomatic cochlear implant patients.

Financial Disclosures:  Hourly student employee from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures. 

 

Correction Factor Methods for Threshold Estimation Using Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Testing

Emily J. Casson

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/8920759653

Abstract: Auditory brainstem response (ABR) correction factors provide estimates of behavioral hearing thresholds used in hearing aid programming for infants until reliable behavioral results are attainable. The purpose of the study was to investigate trends in correction factors currently being used by practicing audiologists to estimate audiometric thresholds from ABR thresholds. Survey results indicated constant corrections are most commonly used with the specific correction factor value applied differing across stimuli. 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to explain how behavioral hearing thresholds are estimated from auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing.
  2. Participants will be able to list correction factor methods.
  3. Participants will be able to describe the variability in correction factors currently being used by audiologists.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate audiology administrative assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Can Smartphone Audiometry Be Useful as a Diagnostic Tool? 

Avia Lowe

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/3653448561

Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, 4.32 million persons worldwide experience disabling hearing loss. Many individuals with hearing loss reside in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and rural communities of high-income countries, without access to hearing healthcare. Recently, smartphone applications have been used to assess individuals without access to hearing healthcare. The purpose of this project is to evaluate whether smartphone audiometry is an effective option for diagnostic hearing assessment of individuals without access to a clinic. 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. After this presentation, participants will be able to describe why smartphone audiometry is of interest.  
  2. After this presentation, participants will be able to identify available smartphone audiometry tools. 
  3. After this presentation, participants will be able to describe the current limitations of smartphone audiometry.  

Financial Disclosures: Hourly student employee from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures. 

 

Online Hearing Screening Using Suprathreshold Psychophysics

Brittany A. Mok

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/3665591601

Abstract: A meta-analysis of speech-in-noise performance was conducted to evaluate its usefulness in discriminating between listeners with normal hearing and moderate hearing loss. A large effect size was estimated, suggesting viability of speech-in-noise testing as a surrogate for online hearing screening. Accordingly, when the modified rhyme test (MRT) in babble was used to screen participants, online data on many classic psychoacoustic tasks matched well-controlled lab-based data from individuals with normal audiograms.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify the challenges of performing traditional hearing tests online.
  2. Describe how a suprathreshold task of speech identification in babble can discriminate between listeners with normal vs. impaired hearing with high confidence.
  3. Describe the evidence that screening with a suprathreshold speech task yields high quality online data that agrees with data obtained from controlled experiments collected in the lab.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate research assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. The authors of this presentation have no financial conflicts of interest to disclose. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants R01DC015989 (Principal Investigator, PI: Hari M. Bharadwaj), F31DC017381 (PI: Vibha Viswanathan), and T32DC016853 (PI: Ravinderjit Singh). No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Trained Peer-Mediated Intervention on Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Complex Communication Needs

Annie Childers

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/my/alchilde

Abstract: Do children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and complex communication needs (CCNs) make greater gains in social communication following peer-mediated interventions if peers are trained on alternative augmentative communication (AAC)? This project compared the communication outcomes of specific peer-training on AAC to untrained peer-mediated intervention. The review suggested preliminary evidence that using a peer-mediated approach with specific training on AAC can increase functional communication and reciprocal exchanges of children with ASD and CCNs. The findings suggest that peer-training on AAC is an effective intervention, but further research including other internal and external factors is necessary.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to describe the communication challenges a child with ASD and CCNs might experience.
  2. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to describe necessary treatment considerations for children with ASD and CCNs.
  3. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to summarize the benefits of peer training on AAC in peer-mediated interventions.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Can Digital Storytelling Improve Narrative Comprehension? Comparing Digital vs. Nondigital Storytelling

Nicole Clements

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/8044093297

Abstract: Can digital storytelling improve narrative comprehension skills in children with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD)? This project examined various forms of digital storytelling (e.g., Tangible Story Avatars, iPad applications, distributed learning environments) and their impact on children’s narrative comprehension skills, specifically story grammar. The review suggested that digital storytelling supports narrative comprehension and reduces cognitive load; however, additional experimental research is needed. The findings suggest that digital storytelling should be used within a group therapy setting and asynchronously with traditional, nondigital storytelling instruction to best support children with DLD.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to list nondigital storytelling strategies that are used to target narrative comprehension.
  2. Participant will be able to define digital storytelling within the context of multisensory learning.
  3. Participant will be able to summarize current research findings concerning the impact of digital storytelling on narrative comprehension instruction.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Morphological Awareness Intervention and Reading Comprehension for School-Aged Children with Dyslexia

Madison Collignon

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/7997222094

Abstract: Does morphological awareness intervention improve reading comprehension of school-aged children diagnosed with reading disorders and/or dyslexia? This project analyzed eight research studies regarding the effect of morphological awareness instruction in children ranging from kindergarten to eighth grade. The review suggests a comprehensive literacy approach with a morphological awareness focus is effective for improving reading comprehension. Additionally, students with reading disorders and/or dyslexia benefit from the morphological awareness instruction more than typically developing peers. Despite these findings, various morphological awareness instructional tasks were used across studies, resulting in varying effect sizes. Therefore, further research is needed to optimize and standardize morphological awareness instruction.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participant will be able to define the different types of readers and the primary and secondary deficits associated with each.
  2. The participant will be able to summarize the four domains of morphological awareness and two ways morphological awareness impacts reading comprehension.
  3. The participant will be able to identify five parameters of morphological awareness intervention that enhance reading comprehension for school-aged children with reading disorders and/or dyslexia.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

In School-Aged Children with Cleft Palate with or without Cleft Lip, will Articulation Therapy with a Phonological Approach be more effective in Improving Speech Therapy Outcomes as compared to Traditional Articulation Therapy?

Laura James

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/8409834612

Abstract: Will articulation therapy with a phonological approach, compared to traditional articulation therapy, yield better speech therapy outcomes for school-aged children with cleft palate, with or without cleft lip (CP±L)? The two forms of therapy were examined with single-subject designs, using a child as their own baseline, as well as with comparative studies, looking at differences in outcomes for children receiving either approach. It was found that both forms of therapy yield positive speech outcomes, with inconclusive findings suggesting that a phonological approach may benefit a child more. Therefore, a speech pathologist may want to use a phonological approach for a child with CP±L, but needs to focus on the individuality of a client to determine which approach would be most beneficial for them.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to identify the differences between traditional articulation therapy and articulation therapy with a phonological approach.
  2. Participant will be able to summarize the medical complexity of these clients, as well as the complexity of their speech systems.
  3. Participant will be able to describe the course of speech therapy treatment for a child who has CP±L.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Early Communication Predictors of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Caitie Madden

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/my/caitiemadden

Abstract: Which early communication characteristics are most predictive of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? This project compared communication behaviors in children ages 6-24 months to help speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make informed decisions about assessment options for ASD. The review suggested several significant predictors within expressive and receptive language at ages 12 and 18 months. SLPs can use this knowledge to choose appropriate language assessment tools for young children suspected of having ASD.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participant will be able to rank the most significant communication predictors of ASD under 24 months.
  2. The participant will be able to formulate an appropriate assessment plan for children ages 12-24 months suspected of presenting with ASD.
  3. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to identify considerations that SLPs should implement in the ASD diagnosis process.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 


Presentation Group 2  5:00-6:00 pm

Use of AR to Reduce Social Isolation in Adults with MCI

Brittany Schutter

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/7241948333

Abstract: Can therapeutic tasks administered via augmented reality (AR) devices reduce social isolation in adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)? In order to determine the feasibility of implementing therapy for adults with MCI via AR modalities, a literature review examined the extent to which in-person treatments can reduce social isolation, reported treatment outcomes when AR was used in other disorder areas, and older adults’ willingness to use AR. The literature review supported passable feasibility for AR as a service delivery tool to reduce social isolation in adults with MCI. Additional research is required, across disciplines, to determine the feasibility and efficacy of AR as a service delivery tool before it can be reliably used in clinical practice.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to describe consequences of social isolation in those with memory deficits
  2. Participant will be able to describe the importance of therapeutic interventions for those with memory deficits
  3. Participant will be able to identify benefits of continued research on AR as a service delivery modality

Financial Disclosures: Teaching Assistant with the Oral English Proficiency Program with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Aphasia Treatment: Teletherapy vs. In-Person

Alleah Thompson

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/s/3669396635#success

Abstract: When treating individuals with aphasia, how does the efficacy of teletherapy compare to traditional, in-person therapy? This poster compares treatment outcomes following virtual and in-person therapy for a variety of treatment and aphasia types. The review provides strong evidence in support of teletherapy, as current findings indicate no significant difference between treatment outcomes and suggest potential advantages in which teletherapy may reduce client attrition among the elderly population. Based on these findings, speech language pathologists are encouraged to discuss the potential benefits of teletherapy with clients diagnosed with aphasia in order to provide optimal speech and language services.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participant will be able to list three factors that would make a client a strong candidate for teletherapy.
  2. The participant will be able to describe the pros and cons of teletherapy.
  3. The participant will be able to list three treatment approaches that have been researched and found effective via teletherapy.

Financial Disclosures: Oral English Proficiency Program tutor with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

  

Implicitly priming language production in people with aphasia using a comprehension task

Briana Cox

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/8269376856

Abstract: This study examined if healthy older adults (HOA) and persons with aphasia (PWA) can produce passive structures more frequently following comprehension of passive sentences. The preliminary findings showed that both groups implicitly learned to produce passives better after a comprehension task. However, the effect size was smaller for PWA and additional lexical priming did not boost the implicit learning in PWA. I will discuss further clinical implications of these findings.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain the structural priming paradigm in the context of language learning
  2. Explain the different priming effects in the same vs. different verb conditions in the utterances of healthy older adults and persons with aphasia.
  3. Explain clinical implications of structural priming in patients with aphasia.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate fellowship recipient with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures. 

 

Using Commercial Gum and Starch Based Thickeners in Infants 0-6 Months: Effects on dysphagia & reflux symptoms, health, and nutrition

Katie Bolte

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/7950777737

Abstract: This project explored how commercial thickeners may affect swallowing, respiratory and digestive health, and nutrition in infants 0-6 months of age. A literature review of eight articles was conducted. Results revealed mixed findings across domains. Specifically, although some positive effects of thickeners on management of reflux and dysphagia in infants were reported by few studies, potential negative impacts on digestive health and nutrient availability were also reported. Considering all the reviewed evidence, although there is limited evidence to support that using a starch or gum based thickener may be beneficial for managing reflux or dysphagia for some infants, it has to be highlighted that if health care providers decide to use them, they need to very carefully plan and monitor implementation to avoid or reduce potential negative impacts. Furthermore, implementation of starch based thickeners may result in less severe negative impacts to digestive health and nutrition, though they do not thicken milk. Alternatively, gum thickeners thicken milk but may result in more severe effects. In addition, given the methodological limitations, small sample sizes, and overall small number of studies available on the topic more research is urgently needed. 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participant will be able to describe 2 types of commercial thickeners used with infants.
  2. The participant will be able to identify 2 potential positive effects of using commercial thickeners with infants.
  3. The participant will be able to identify 2 potential negative effects of using commercial thickeners with infants.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Dysphagia Screening Protocols for Stroke Patients

Caroline Sheehan

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/97129454090

Abstract:  This project synthesized current literature to determine crucial elements of an evidence-based dysphagia screening tool. The evidence recommends a screening tool that demonstrates high psychometric properties and is easily implemented in the workplace. Six existing dysphagia screening protocols were evaluated based on their ability to meet recommendations provided by the literature. The Toronto Bedside Swallowing Screen Test met all core requirements of an evidence-based dysphagia screening protocol. To standardize the methods used to identify risk for dysphagia and/or aspiration, the implementation of the Toronto Bedside Swallowing Screen into clinical practice to screen stroke patients is recommended.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will describe the negative health and fiscal outcomes of unidentified post-stroke dysphagia.
  2. Participants will summarize current research findings regarding necessary components of an evidence-based dysphagia screening protocol.
  3. Participants will list three ways speech-language pathologists and other medical professionals can assess the efficacy of a screening protocol used to identify risk of dysphagia and/or aspiration in stroke patients.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Recent Advances in Stem-Cell Research for Laryngeal Reconstruction

Jennifer Shaffer

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/3087865542?pwd=L0pxODJweWFkU1NvclBaY29jOVNzUT09

Abstract: Can muscle-progenitor implantion restore vocal fold structure and function, and what are the clinical implications of this restoration? This project summarized findings from the past 14 years of studies implementing tissue-engineering to regenerate damaged or missing laryngeal structures. The laboratory model has been refined over time to achieve better structural and functional outcomes of the laryngeal implant. Continued research may lead to treatment for human larynxes, warranting creation of clinical treatment plans to meet pre- and post-operative needs in patients. There are no financial conflicts of interest to disclose.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to define the basic model of muscle-progenitor cell implants.
  2. Participant will be able to summarize three major areas of findings concerning muscle-progenitor cell implants.
  3. Participant will be able to list three components of proposed treatment involving speech-language pathology.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate teaching assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Could auditory brainstem response measures be used to identify risk for autism spectrum disorder?

Delaney Hake

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/9180819833?pwd=TG41QzJUSStHZTNad3piKzNvMitsUT09

Abstract: Identifying an objective biomarker of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) could aid in earlier diagnosis, intervention, and improved outcomes for children. A growing body of research is investigating such a biomarker by utilizing auditory brainstem response (ABR) measures, which are widely performed in the pediatric population. In this literature review, previous research that has investigated a potential biomarker of ASD using ABR measures is evaluated and its potential application to current clinical practice is discussed.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the viability of using auditory brainstem response (ABR) measures to identify a potential biomarker of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
  2. Identify the possible functional and structural differences in the auditory brainstem responses and pathology of children with autism spectrum disorder.
  3. Summarize the current limitations in implementing this type of objective biomarker search into standard clinical practice.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate research assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures. 

 

Reducing listening effort in noise for cochlear implant users

Breanna Oakes

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/3891686596

Abstract: Cochlear implants (CIs) can provide patients with severe to profound hearing loss access to sound but understanding speech in noise is still challenging and increases listening effort. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to analyze the physiology of listening effort, listening effort measurements and determine evidence-based programming strategies to decrease listening effort for CI users. Research concludes that increasing the number of spectral channels and activating adaptable directionality will decrease listening effort and enhance speech recognition in noise.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to explain listening effort and identify the consequences individuals may face when listening in the presence of noise.
  2. Participants will be able to describe how listening effort can be measured.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and describe CI programming strategies to reduce listening effort.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures. 

 

A Pediatric Vestibular Screening Protocol For Use By Healthcare Professionals        

Amy Elaine Prasad Eapen

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Zoom link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/7034033309

Abstract: Pediatric vestibular disorders go largely undiagnosed due to paucity of research, varying clinical presentations and lack of age-appropriate screening protocols. Studies show that early intervention prevents the progression of deficits from a compromised vestibular system. We reviewed literature to identify vestibular screening tests appropriate for use in children, and devise a screening protocol that can be easily implemented by audiologists, for early identification of pediatric vestibular disorders.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain the prevalence of vestibular disorders in children and identify the risk factors associated with it.
  2. Describe the need for early detection and intervention of pediatric vestibular disorders.
  3. Define the protocol to be followed for screening children suspected to have vestibular disorders.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate teaching assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.  

 

How Does Varying Signal-to-Noise Ratios Affect Cognitive Load and Balance?

Allison Reitz

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Zoom link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/6558895386

Abstract: The purpose of this study aims to determine how factors such as balance, cognition, and hearing loss affect fall risks. In order to test balance, Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) testing with be done and for testing cognition, the Quick Speech-In-Noise (QuickSIN) will be used. It is predicted that when tasked with balancing along with listening to speech and noise stimuli and then repeating sentences that participants will experience poorer balance.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify the possible effects of cognitive load in conjunction with balance.
  2. Evaluate how balance, hearing, somatosensory inputs are interrelated.
  3. Describe test batteries involved in this project.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Evaluating a Nonlinear Subtraction Technique as a Means to Acquire High-frequency Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

Kristen M. Wade

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Zoom Link (please copy and paste this link in a new browser)https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/6212276458?pwd=VC85VGxjK016bVg5bmU5dDdtSGZrdz09#success 

Abstract: Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) provide a non-invasive window into the frequency-specific amplification function of the inner ear. Yet, conventional TEOAE measures cannot assess frequencies beyond 3 kHz due to overlap between the evoking stimulus and the TEOAE. We implemented and tested a novel nonlinear subtraction paradigm that can overcome this limitation and provide improved signal-to-noise ratio at high frequencies that are important for early diagnosis of auditory damage.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The participants will be able to understand the technical challenge faced when using conventional OAE measures to assess high-frequency hearing
  2. The participants will be able to describe the difference between the conventional transient OAE measures and the novel nonlinear subtraction method used here.
  3. The participants will be able to identify the importance of measuring otoacoustic emissions past 3 kHz, including the extended high frequencies.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate research assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants R01DC015989 (HMB), and R01DC008327 (EAS). No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

The Impact of Language Environment on Language Development in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

Claire Maesaka

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/5973664592

Abstract: Current research suggests that language development in children is greatly affected by their language environment. Studies show that the differences across language environments have hindered language acquisition among some children. Similarly, research has revealed a disparity in language performance between deaf and hard of hearing children and their normal hearing peers. This literature review serves to examine whether or not the differences across language environments are responsible for this discrepancy. The results suggest that certain components of the language environment have predictive value regarding linguistic outcomes, however the difference in language performance cannot be explained by the language environment alone. Further research regarding additional factors must be considered.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify the components of language environment
  2. Discuss the effects of language environment on language development in normal hearing and deaf and hard of hearing children
  3. Determine additional variables that may impact language development
  4. Apply this information to treatment planning and counseling

Financial Disclosures: Graduate teaching assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Effects of Postpartum Depression on the Language Development of Infants and Toddlers    

Kathryn Bower

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/4723645743

Abstract: What are the effects of postpartum depression (PPD) on the language development of infants and toddlers? This project synthesizes current research literature and compares results suggesting that postpartum depression has indirect, direct and no effect on the language development of infants and toddlers. The strongest evidence suggests that the language development of infants and toddlers is indirectly affected by PPD. Speech-language pathologists should support young children and families affected by PPD through increased awareness, involvement in screening programs, referrals, thorough case histories and promotion of literacy stimulation activities.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participant will be able to describe the overlapping and differentiating characteristics of “baby blues” and postpartum depression.
  2. Participant will be able to list three indirect effects of PPD on the language development of infants and toddlers.
  3. Participant will be able to list and describe at least three ways that speech-language pathologists can support young children and families affected by PPD.

Financial Disclosures: Graduate research assistant with tuition remission from Purdue University. No other relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Effects of Explicit versus Implicit Vocabulary Instruction during Shared Storybook

Cecilia Moore

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/3320605691

Abstract: Shared storybook reading (SSR) is a technique used by speech-language pathologists to support vocabulary development for young children with developmental language disorders (DLD). This paper investigated whether vocabulary taught using explicit techniques through embedded or extended instruction as compared to implicit instruction taught through incidental word exposure increases vocabulary development in children with DLD. The review of literature indicated that vocabulary intervention focused on explicit instruction as compared to implicit instruction alone led to increased expressive/receptive vocabulary use. The findings suggest that vocabulary intervention using explicit instruction on a few vocabulary words and promoting incidental word learning opportunities within SSR will lead to the strongest gains in vocabulary development in young children with DLD.    

Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to describe three instruction methods used within shared storybook reading to support vocabulary development.
  2. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to list the benefits of shared storybook reading to promote vocabulary development.
  3. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to integrate shared storybook reading with three vocabulary instruction methods to provide evidence-based vocabulary intervention. 

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

AAC and Language Growth in Children with ASD

Kelly Rogers

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/2382159498

Abstract: What factors predict language growth in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) following augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention? This project sought to determine which characteristics may predict positive language change in children with ASD who engage in AAC interventions. Results from prior research indicate that ASD symptomology, comorbidities, object play/exploration, motivation, age, and peer communication may influence language growth. Although more research is necessary, clinicians may wish to measure and consider these factors when making AAC selections, plans of care, and prognostic statements.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to describe five observational factors that impact language growth in children with ASD.
  2. Participants will be able to analyze how multiple factors may influence AAC selection and language growth in children with ASD.
  3. Participants will be able to identify three case history components to help predict a child’s language growth with AAC intervention.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Embedded Phonological Awareness Tasks in Shared Storybook Reading vs. Drill-Based Tasks for Preschool Children with DLD

McKaylee Slagel

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/5775004189

Abstract: What is the effect of embedded phonological awareness (PA) intervention during shared storybook reading (SSR) compared to drill-based delivery for preschool children with a developmental language disorder? This project explored the effectiveness of SSR to enhance children’s PA skills compared to explicit PA instruction through drill-based intervention. Children who receive PA training embedded in SSR have been proven to make gains in the domains of PA, as well as their literacy and vocabulary knowledge. While children who receive drill-based intervention have improved rhyme awareness and nonword spelling skills, research does not yet indicate that drill-based intervention supports gains in all areas of PA. SSR with embedded PA tasks is more likely to produce a more significant benefit over drill-based PA intervention as all elements of PA, in addition to vocabulary knowledge and print awareness, can improve. In clinical practice, clinicians can implement strategies such as increasing the dosage of SSR with embedded PA intervention, following the PA hierarchy, and providing explicit feedback to improve the preschooler’s potential for progress. 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to list the proven benefits of shared storybook reading with embedded phonological awareness intervention as well as those of drill-based intervention.
  2. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to implement elements of shared storybook reading with embedded phonological awareness intervention with a preschool-aged child.
  3. As a result of this poster, the participant will be able to list five potential solutions to use when a child is not making progress in shared storybook reading with embedded phonological awareness intervention. 

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

Social Skills Treatments in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Music Therapy and Social Skills Training

Belle Underwood

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Zoom Link: https://purdue-edu.zoom.us/j/4377035941?pwd=NzJJbUdoc0lUV3BvVy82MFZxVmpMZz09

Abstract: Should Music Therapy be considered when targeting deficits in social skill in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? This project compared the outcomes of studies examining the efficacy of Music Therapy and Social Skills Training in improving social communication in children with ASD. The review suggested that current research more strongly supports Social Skills Training than Music Therapy. The evidence suggests that Music Therapy should be implemented with caution, but also discusses circumstances in which clinical judgment should be used.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe Music Therapy and Social Skills training as they relate to social skills in children with ASD
  2. Summarize evidence supporting the use of Music Therapy and Social Skills training for the targeting of social skills in children with ASD.
  3. Evaluate the potential of Music Therapy and Social Skills training for individual children with ASD.

Financial Disclosures: No relevant financial disclosures.

Non-Financial Disclosures: Student at Purdue University. No other relevant non-financial disclosures.

 

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