Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Events and News

2021 Ernest J. McCormick Memorial Lecture

Lecture Title: "Black in Business: Reflections on the Role of Race in Industrial and Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior" (bio/abstract)
Speaker: Dr. Derek R. Avery, C.T. Bauer Chair of Inclusive Leadership in the Bauer College of Business at the University of Houston
Date: Thursday, March 18, 2021, 12:00-1:00 p.m. ET (live on Zoom)
Contact Dr. Franki Kung (frankikung@purdue.edu) for info and Zoom access

Psychological Sciences funded HHS Diversity & Inclusion Proposals (funding allocated in Summer 2020):

Project:  “A Novel Approach to Multicultural Competence Training for Graduate Students in HHS”

Investigators:  Allycen Kurup, Molly Maloney, Taylor Halligan, Anna Forster 

The Multicultural Competence Training project, funded by an initiative for Advancing Diversity and Inclusion in the College of Health and Human Sciences, is designed to increase multicultural competence in HHS graduate students’ health service practices and scholarship, foster accountability for graduate students to continue growing in multicultural competencies, and provide potential future steps toward incorporating multicultural competence into each HHS area. We have held a two-part virtual training conducted by Dr. Gabriela Nagy from Duke University, and formed an interdisciplinary steering committee to engage several areas of HHS. We are currently conducting monthly working groups in which HHS graduate students dive deeply into relevant multicultural competence topics. All HHS graduate students in health and human service areas are welcome to participate in these ongoing working groups.

Interested graduate students may contact Allycen Kurup (kurup@purdue.edu) for more information on how to join the project.

Project: “Health & Human Sciences Anti-Racism Discussion Group and Library”

Investigators:  Elizabeth Sahagun, Chaylen Andolina, Keisha Bailey, Anna Forster, Mary Katherine Huffman

HHS anti-racism reading group is a grad student-led initiative to increase race-related education within the college. The goals of this group are to 1) increase student understanding of racial inequities that exist in society; 2) discuss how racism relates to structural inequities that exist in research and academia; 3) understand the non-academic experience of non-white students; and 4) foster a sense of community within the entire HHS community. These goals will be met by engaging with anti-racism literature and participating in guided discussion (on Slack and bi-weekly via Zoom). For spring 2021, we will be reading How to Be an Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi. Books will be available to students and we will start discussing this book in January/February.

You can sign up to join for this book discussion here.

Project:  “Enhancing Agency and Addressing Gaps: Building on Underrepresented Minority Graduate Students’ Self-Assessed Needs”

Investigators:  Adilene Osnaya, Kimberly Galvez-Ortega

Using a longitudinal and multimethod approach, our funded project intends to (1) document the challenges faced by URM graduate students, (2) document general coping mechanisms and resources utilized to cope with these challenges, (3) identify college-specific coping resources that have been useful, and (4) identify the self-identified resources needed but unavailable by underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students.  In addition to assessing the primary aims, we intend to track changes longitudinally in important outcomes including psychological wellbeing, self-esteem, and academic self-efficacy. The ultimate goal is to make recommendations to HHS, guided by the voices of those they intend to support, for the development and implementation of currently unavailable resources.

Project:  “Addressing Mental and Physical Health Needs Among LGBTQIA+ College Students Post-Sexual Assault”

Investigators:  Daniel Oesterle, Andrea Massa, Elizabeth Aslinger

Using a longitudinal and multimethod approach, our funded project intends to (1) document the challenges faced by URM graduate students, (2) document general coping mechanisms and resources utilized to cope with these challenges, (3) identify college-specific coping resources that have been useful, and (4) identify the self-identified resources needed but unavailable by underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students.  In addition to assessing the primary aims, we intend to track changes longitudinally in important outcomes including psychological wellbeing, self-esteem, and academic self-efficacy. The ultimate goal is to make recommendations to HHS, guided by the voices of those they intend to support, for the development and implementation of currently unavailable resources.

Related Colloquia

Information coming soon.

Psychological Sciences, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-6061 FAX: (765) 496-1264

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