Bridgette (Tonnsen) Kelleher

Degree: Ph.D., 2015, University of South Carolina

Bridgette Kelleher is an Associate Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. She received her undergraduate degree from Furman University and her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina.

Research Interests:

Dr. Kelleher’s research examines early behavioral and biological markers of risk and resilience in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Her primary work investigates infant precursors of clinical conditions such as autism, attention problems, and anxiety through cross-syndrome, longitudinal surveillance. For example, she is currently PI of a 5-year NIH-funded study to develop telehealth-based methods for surveying autism risk in children with rare syndromes. She also studies the intersection of family factors (e.g. maternal psychopathology, genetic risk, parenting stress) and child clinical outcomes in genetic conditions such as fragile X syndrome. By integrating gold-standard clinical tools with both experimental and physiological methods, her work aims to inform developmental emergence of neurodevelopmental phenotypes and potential points of intervention.

Dr. Kelleher is not accepting applications for the 2020-21 school year.

In the News:

Recent Publications:

Note: Dr. Kelleher formerly published as Bridgette L. Tonnsen

Kelleher, B.L., & Wheeler, A.C. (in press). Outcome measures for intellectual disability: Where we have been, where we are now, and where we are going. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Thurm, A., Kelleher, B.L., & Wheeler, A.C. (in press). Outcome measures for core symptoms of intellectual disability: State of the field. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Kelleher, B., Halligan, T., Witthuhn, N., Neo, W.S., Hamrick, L., & Abbeduto, L. (2020). Bringing the laboratory home: PANDABox telehealth-based assessment of neurodevelopment risk in children, Frontiers Psychology, 11(1634), 1-14.   

Hamrick, L.R., Haney, A.M., Kelleher, B.L., & Lane, S.P. (2020). Using generalizability theory to evaluate the comparative reliability of developmental measures in neurogenetic syndrome and low-risk populations. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 12(6), 1-15.

Kelleher, B. L., Hogan, A., Ezell, J., Caravella, K., Schmidt, J., Wang, Q., & Roberts, J. E. (2020). Anxiety and threat-related attentional biases in adolescents with fragile X syndrome. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 64, 296-302.

Kelleher, B. L., Halligan, T. A., Garwood, T. E., Howell, S. M., Martin-O’Dell, B. M., Swint, A. M., Shelton, L. A., Shin, J. J. (2020). Brief report: Assessment experiences of children with neurogenetic syndromes: Caregivers’ perceptions and suggestions for improvement. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 50, 1443-1450.

Hill, K. E., Neo, W. S., Hernandez, A., Hamrick, L., Kelleher, B. L., & Foti, D. (2020). Intergenerational transmission of frontal alpha asymmetry among mother-infant dyads. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, 5, 420-428.

Hahn, L. H., Hamrick, L. R., Kelleher, B. L., & Roberts, J. E. (2020). Autism spectrum disorder-associated behavior in infants with Down syndrome. Journal of Health Science and Education, 4, 1-6.

Wall, C. A., Hogan, A. L., Will, E., McQuillin, S., Kelleher, B. L., & Roberts, J. (2019). Early negative affect in males and females with FXS: Implications for anxiety and autism. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 11(22), 1-13.

Hamrick, L., Seidl, A., & Tonnsen, B.L. (2019). Acoustic properties of early vocalizations in infants with fragile X syndrome. Autism Research, 12, 1663-1679.

Hogan, A., Crawford, H., Fairchild, A., Tonnsen, B., Brewe, A., O’Connor, S., Roberts, D. J., & Roberts, J. E. (2019). Social avoidance emerges in infancy and persists into adulthood in fragile X syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 49, 3753-3766.

Hamrick, L. R. & Tonnsen, B. L. (2019). Validating and applying the CSBS-ITC in neurogenetic syndromes. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 124, 263-285.

Neo, W. S. & Tonnsen, B. L. (2019). Challenging behaviors in toddlers and preschoolers with Angelman, Prader-Willi, and Williams syndromes. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 4, 1717-1726.

Kellerman, A. M., Schwichtenberg, A. J., Tonnsen, B. L., Posada, G., & Lane, S. P. (2019). Dyadic interactions in children exhibiting the broader autism phenotype: Is the BAP distinguishable from typical development? Autism Research, 12, 469-481.

Roberts, J.E., Crawford, H., Will, E. A., Hogan, A., McQuillin, S.D., Tonnsen, B. L., O’Connor, S. L., Roberts, D. A., Brewe, A. (2019). Infant social avoidance predicts autism but not anxiety in fragile X syndrome. Frontiers Psychiatry, 10(199), 1-10.

Tonnsen, B. L., Wheeler, A. C., Rague, L., & Roberts, J. E. (2018). Infant temperament in the FMR1 premutation and fragile X syndrome. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 48, 412-422.

Klusek, J., Porter, A., Abbeduto, L., Adayev, T., Tassone, F., Mailick, M., Glicksman, A., Tonnsen, B. L., & Roberts, J. E. (2018). Curvilinear association between language disfluecny and FMR1 CGG repeat size across the normal, intermediate, and premutation range. Frontiers in Genetics, 9, 344.

Rague, L. R., Caravella, K. C, Klusek, J., Tonnsen, B. L., & Roberts, J. E. (2018). Early gesture use in fragile X syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 62, 625-636.

Tonnsen, B.L., Richards, J.E., & Roberts, J.E. (2018). Heart rate-defined sustained attention in infants at risk for autism. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 10(1): 7.

Tonnsen, B. L., Scherr, J., Reisinger, D., Roberts, J. E. (2017). Behavioral markers of emergent stranger anxiety in infants and toddlers with fragile X syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 47, 3646-3658.

Lowell, E., Tonnsen, B. L., Bailey, D. B., & Roberts, J. E. (2017). The effects of optimism, religion, and hope on mood and anxiety disorders in women with the FMR1 premutation. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 61, 916-927.

Abel, E. & Tonnsen, B. L. (2017). Sleep phenotypes in infants and toddlers with neurogenetic syndromes. Sleep Medicine, 38, 130-134.

Guy, M.W., Richards, J.E., Tonnsen, B. L., Roberts, J.E. (2017). Neural correlates of face processing in etiologically-distinct 12-month-old infants at high-risk of autism spectrum disorder. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2017.03.002

Tonnsen, B. L., Boan, A. D., Bradley, C. C., Charles, J., Cohen, A., & Carpenter, L. A. (2016). Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders among children with intellectual disabilities. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 121, 6, 487-500.

Roberts*, J. E., Tonnsen, B. L., McCary, L. M., Long, A., Golden, R. N., & Bailey, D. B. (2016). Trajectories and predictors of depression and anxiety disorders in women with the FMR1 premutation. Biological Psychiatry, 79, 850-7.

Roberts*, J. E., Tonnsen, B. L., McCary, L. M., Caravella, K., Shinkareva, S. (2016). Autism symptoms in infants with fragile X syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46, 3830-3837.

Tonnsen, B. L. & Roberts, J.E. (2016). Emergent anxiety through the lens of fragile X. International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, 51, 41-83.

 

Bridgette Tonnsen

Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology and Neuroscience

Mailing Address:
Department of Psychological Sciences
Purdue University
703 Third Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2081 USA

Campus Address:
Psychological Sciences, Room 1150

E-mail: bkelleher@purdue.edu
Telephone: (765) 494-6754
Website
CV: Bridgette Kelleher.pdf

Psychological Sciences, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-6061 FAX: (765) 496-1264

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