Nadia Brashier

Degree: Ph.D. Duke University, 2018

Research Interests:

I study memory and judgment across the lifespan, with a specific focus on cognitive “shortcuts” people use to evaluate truth. My research identifies why young and older adults fall for fake news and misinformation.

Recent Publications:

Brashier, N. M., Pennycook G., Berinsky, A. J., & Rand, D. G. (2021). Timing matters when correcting fake news. PNAS

Brashier, N. M., & Fazio, L. K. (2020). Why do older adults share more misinformation? We need social media data to find out. The Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review

Brashier, N. M., & Schacter, D. L. (2020). Aging in an era of fake news. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 29(3), 316-323. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420915872

Brashier, N. M., Eliseev, E. D., & Marsh, E. J. (2020). An initial accuracy focus prevents illusory truth. Cognition, 194, 104054. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104054

Brashier, N. M., & Marsh, E. J. (2020). Judging truth. Annual Review of Psychology, 71(1), 499. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-010419-050807

Wang, W., Brashier, N. M., Wing, E. A., Marsh, E. J., & Cabeza, R. (2018). Knowledge supports memory retrieval through familiarity, not recollection. Neuropsychologia, 113, 14-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.019

Wang, W., Brashier, N. M., Wing, E. A., Marsh, E. J., & Cabeza, R. (2018). Neural basis of goal-driven changes in knowledge activation. European Journal of Neuroscience, 48(11), 3389-3396. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14196

Brashier, N. M., & Multhaup, K. S. (2017). Magical thinking decreases across adulthood. Psychology and Aging, 32(8), 681-688. https://doi.org/10.1037/pag0000208

Brashier, N. M., Umanath, S., Cabeza, R., & Marsh, E. J. (2017). Competing cues: Older adults rely on knowledge in the face of fluency. Psychology and Aging, 32(4), 331-337. https://doi.org/10.1037/pag0000156

Wang, W., Brashier, N. M., Wing, E. A., Marsh, E. J., & Cabeza, R. (2016). On known unknowns: Fluency and the neural mechanisms of illusory truth. Journal of CognitiveNeuroscience, 28(5), 739-746. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00923

Nadia Brashier Photo

Assistant Professor, Cognitive

Mailing Address:
Department of Psychological Sciences
Purdue University
703 Third Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2081 USA

Campus Address:
Psychological Sciences

E-Mail:  brashier@purdue.edu

Telephone: (765) 494-0648

CV: Nadia Brashier

Web Page: https://www.nadiabrashier.com/

Psychological Sciences, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-6061 FAX: (765) 496-1264

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