Graduate Research Recognition Week 

Graduate Research Recognition Week (also known as GRR Week) is an annual showcasing of current research projects our students are undertaking as well as insightful mini-sessions to assist students to become better scholars. This event typically takes place in the Fall term and members of the Purdue community are welcome to attend. 

Save the Date

Fall 2021 - December 6-10, 2021

November 16 - 20, 2020

Graduate Posters

  • Hospitality Students’ Attitude towards Service Robots and its Impact on Willingness to Learn and Intention to Join the Hospitality Industry: The Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence 
    presented by Xueting (Katherine) Dou
  • How do the online review types affect the booking intention of peer-to-peer accommodation among consumers from different cultures?
    presented by Hhye Won (Grace) Shin
  • How do the host pictures influence consumers' booking intention of peer-to-peer accommodation across different cultures? -An eye-tracking approach.
    presented by Hhye Won (Grace) Shin
  • Consumers’ Perception of Wine Value and Purchasing Intention
    presented by Xinyue Li
  • Sustainable Supply Chain Management Issues for Tour Operators – An Examination of Fair Tourism Operators in South Korea
    presented by Seungah (Chris) Chung
  • Guest-Host Relationship in the Post-Pandemic Era: A Cross-Cultural Perspective  
    presented by Jianan Lee (née Zhang)
  • Inequalities in Urban Exploration 
    presented by Jacquelyn Meade
  • An Automatic Event Detection System for Hospitality Business
    presented by Rachel Zhang

 

Graduate Presentations

Dates

Title & Description

Nov 17th

2 pm | 30 mins

Jianan Lee (née Zhang)
In Search of the Origins of Chinese Hospitality through Western Lenses
The adoption of commercially defined hospitality into higher education has raised concerns. With the backdrop of the dilemma between the internationally accepted usage of hospitality in the commercial domain and the ambiguity of it in China’s higher education, this study is designed to identify the core principles of hospitality in its non-commercial origin and initiate an inquiry into the origins of Chinese hospitality by first examining how it was described in English literature prior to the founding of New China in 1949. Overall, the findings from the study are informative yet preliminary in understanding the Chinese practices of hospitality in non-commercial setting through western lenses and in searching for the origins of Chinese hospitality.

Nov 17th

2 pm | 30 mins

Rachel Zhang
Improving Hotel Demand Forecasting Accuracy by Integrating Machine Learning with Pick-Up Methods
Based on the popular pick-up models in hotel revenue management, we are proposing a machine-learning embedded framework which increase forecasting accuracy by 5%.

Nov 18th

10:30 am | 30 mins

Yunmei (Mabel) Bai
Do Words Matter? Consumers’ Perceptions of Words Used to Describe Restaurant Menu Items
The menu is an integral component of a restaurant’s core strategy. Menu descriptions build a mental image of the food prior to consumption, which can influence consumers’ decision-making process. Given that menus are critical tools for marketing a restaurant meal, word selection and patterns must be carefully crafted in order to facilitate this communication. This study could contribute to enriches the literature on menu word item descriptions by first examining current practices and then testing the effect of menu word choice on consumers’ choice.

Nov 18th

3 pm | 30 mins

Xueting (Katherine) Dou
Affective Learning Outcomes from Study Abroad: A Systematic Synthesis
Affective learning outcomes (i.e., emotions, attitudes, values) act as the important underpinning for the proper application of cognitive knowledge and skills across various situations, enabling future graduates to thrive in the globalized society and marketplace. Study abroad programs, especially the increasingly popular short-term ones, provide an ideal platform for students to gain affective outcomes through transformative experiences. This research presents a systematic synthesis of 103 study abroad outcome assessment studies published between 1999 and 2019, identifying the salient affective learning outcomes reported in previous literature and classifying them in accordance with Krathwohl et al. (1964)’s affective taxonomy. Based on the findings, a set of constructs for quantitative evaluation of lower- to higher-level affective learning outcomes was proposed.

Nov 19th

1 pm | 30 mins

Yunmei (Mabel) Bai
The Effect of Hotel Attributes Unbundling on Perceived Fairness and Willingness to Book
In the hotel industry, unbundled pricing starts with a base room rate and allow service attributes to be added according to individual lodger’s preference. Admittedly, unbundled pricing could arouse substantial backlash in that consumers could perceive it as an unfairly charge without offering corresponding extra value. The research objective of this study is to examine how unbundling practice affects consumers’ perceived fairness and booking intention. Theoretically, the current study adds in the growing literature on unbundled pricing in lodging industry. Empirically, the results could provide guidance to hoteliers with respect to how to implement unbundled pricing in practice.

 TBA

Heewon Kim
Can Restaurants’ Preventive Measures Improve Customers’ Dine-in Intentions during the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Given the prevalence of COVID-19, there is a consensus among public health experts that restaurants can be a hub for the spread of the virus. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of restaurant interventions on trust toward the restaurant, along with two factors that were shown to affect message processing in the ELM: relationship strength and need-for-cognition. This study also aimed to explore the mediating role of trust on dine-in intentions. The results of this study expand the understanding of the effectiveness of restaurant interventions to prevent COVID-19. Moreover, this study provides practical suggestions to restauranteurs in terms of forming trust with existing and new customers.

 TBA

Jaehee Gim
Understanding the Reliability of Analysts' Earnings Estimates: Evidence from the Restaurant Industry
Financial analysts predict the future performance of a company and release research reports that include earnings forecasts and stock price estimates. However, the ability of analysts to estimate earnings accurately remains questionable and should warrant some caution. Analysts’ earnings estimate for restaurant firms could be even less accurate due to the innate characteristics of the industry. What is worse, Wall Street continues to exhibit a lack of interest in restaurant firms. This poses important questions: which factors influence the accuracy of analysts’ estimates in the restaurant industry? Does a bias exist in analysts’ earnings estimates in the restaurant industry? Answering these questions could help investors make more informed investment decisions based on the reliability of analysts’ estimates.

 

Mini-Sessions

Dates

Title & Description

Nov 16th

3 pm | 45 mins

Tools to Conduct Research & Data Collection
This conversational workshop will be host by GSA, led by faculty and graduate students. They will share the tools to conduct research and data collection with the attendees, such as using Qualtrics or MTurk. They will illustrate it with actual operations. 

Nov 17th

4 pm | 45 mins

Developing Topics of Impactful Research
This presentation will be in the format of conversational workshop to be led by Prof. Liping Cai with a panel of graduate students. They will share with the attendees the process of identifying research ideas and developing them into viable topics. They will illustrate it with examples of awarding-winning conference papers and journal publications of impactful implications.

Nov 19th

3 pm | 45 mins

Purdue Library Resources & Citation Management Tools
You've narrowed down your research topic and your major professor told you it’s time to do a literature review. Where do you go from here? In this mini-session, HTM Librarian Heather Howards will show students how to utilize Purdue’s vast library system which includes 3,317,331 printed volumes and electronic books; 227,814 electronic and print journals; and government documents and microforms in excess of 400,000. Additionally, Heather will go over citation tools that will help students organize, manage and format citations as they find the perfect articles, books, and datasets for their review.

 

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