You got into graduate school! Now what? Learn how to develop important skills that will get you through and excel in graduate school. Attending this workshop will help you:

  • State your degree, career, and personal goals;
  • Construct your roadmap for your graduate education;
  • Implement effective time management and writing habits;
  • Sustain your progress in graduate school.

You will also learn about resources Purdue has provided and made available for you! 

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Join us to learn more about: Writing roadblocks, writing strategies and rituals, common writing errors, and dissertation support groups!

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How do one secure funding? Learn all about funding options including fellowships, research, teaching, and assistantships!

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Be the best by receiving the best STEM grant in the field! We will discuss:

  • Experiences with application process
  • Questions and discussions with experienced fellows!

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Make the most of your graduate school experience by building your portfolio! Join us and we will equip you with:

  • Marketable skills
  • Strategic Plan
  • Resources available to you! (That you may not know about)

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Be professional and start your portfolio now! Taking this workshop, you should have the knowledge, tips and advice needed to develop your:

  • Resume
  • CV
  • Cover letter
  • Research statement

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Build your network now! Attend this workshop and we will help you:

  • Improve your odds of not being screened out
  • Lead you to a deeper level of satisfaction with your efforts
  • Increase your chances of obtaining a second interview
  • Ultimately assist you to strategically stand out among other students

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Your CV and resume provide an important first impression to potential employers. Attend this workshop and experience:

  • Learning tips and strategies to format and update your work
  • Opportunity to receive feedback on your CV and/or resume
  • Learn to peer review!

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Personal relationships between you and well-respected experienced faculty/staff members are essential to success on your Graduate School Journey. Get it in this workshop!

  • Understand the difference and significance of the various types of mentoring relationships
  • Identify ways to make strong lasting connections
  • Discover ways to find a mentor and learn various mentoring strategies
  • Learn about and how to efficiently utilize mentor networking

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They say the new generation lack attentiveness in financial care. Be the outlier and know your money personality! Join our Preparing Future Faculty class for a special speaker from the financial industry who will give you the basics, tips and strategies for your financial life particularly in assessing your money habits, paying debts, creating a budget and more. Have questions? Get it answered in this workshop.

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Networking may be the key to getting the career you want, this workshop is an opportunity for you to polish your networking skills! Come learn:

  • Identify appropriate contexts and situations for professional networking.
  • Create and deliver elevator pitches
  • Tailor your narratives to different audiences
  • Develop your networking map and plan. (Yes! You need it!)

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Career Roadmap? Yes! Start yours now by attending this workshop!

  • Formulate a Career Strategic Plan
  • Create your Job Search Strategy
  • Develop & update your CV
  • Construct an Institutional Profile.

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A strong interview can help you open the door to career success! By taking this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify proper preparation techniques
  • Explain how types of interviews can differ
  • Practice answering questions they are likely to ask!

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Interview: done. Now what? Dr. Rebecca Doerge, Department Head, Statistics, will help you to be prepared. We will discuss:

  • Preparation
  • Travel
  • Expenses
  • What goes on during and after the interview.

Further, we will discuss what to consider, questions to anticipate, how to negotiate, how to decline a job offer, etc. Join us!

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Beyond “Finding it”: Learning through Information Literacy

This session explores key ideas related to how learners use information in the learning process. This session is open to those  Participants will create learning activities that enable students to effectively use the information to learn and complete research assignments.  Please check with your department for registration information. 

Data Management with NVivo

NVivo 11 (QSR International) is a computer assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) package provided at no cost to the Purdue University community through ITAP, https://www.itap.purdue.edu/shopping/software/products.html or via a low-cost NVivo server license for collaborative projects via CLA BRASS, https://www.cla.purdue.edu/brass/index.html. This mini-workshop is designed to introduce NVivo users to data management best practices throughout the lifecycle of a research project. Participants should already have downloaded or obtained access to NVivo software. This is not an introduction to NVivo, for introductory tutorials please see the Introduction to NVivo powerpoint from CLA https://www.cla.purdue.edu/students/graduate/resources/NVivo.pdf or register for NVivo webinars at http://www.qsrinternational.com/purdue-university.

Introduction to Citation Management

A citation manager is a tool or software that can help you save, store, and manipulate your scholarly references. But which is best for you? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero and all of the others? If you have ever wondered about any of these questions, this is the session for you.  We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you.

Citation Management with EndNote Basic

EndNote Basic citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations.  With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions.  Additionally, EndNote has powerful sharing capabilities that make working with a group easy.  In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, Cite While You Write feature, and sharing with a group.  If possible, please bring your laptop.

Citation Management with Zotero

Think of the last research paper you wrote. How many sources did you cite in it? How did you manage all of those references and sources? For large papers, you may need to keep track of dozens or even hundreds of sources. After doing your research, you can waste hours and hours getting your citations into the proper format, in the correct order in your paper, and listed in your bibliography.  Zotero is a free citation management program that can help you collect, organize, and share your research.  This session is designed to help graduate students get started with Zotero.  Attendees will learn how to set up Zotero, gather citations, and generate bibliographies.

How to Prepare for a Site Visit to an Archive Collection

Getting ready for an archival research trip? This workshop will teach you strategies to ensure you can make the most of your time in the reading room. You will learn how to prepare for research visits, work efficiently with archivists, find relevant collections, read and use finding aids, and pack for your visit. A behind-the-scenes tour of the Purdue Archives will be included to foster understanding of the complexities of special collections research centers.

Managing Your Online Professional Identity

This session will assist graduate students to deliberately develop an online professional identity that will uniquely identify them as an academic as well as positively highlight their personal strengths. Students will walk away with the knowledge and tools to create a unique professional identifier and an understanding of how to measure the impact of online scholarly communication.

Data Organization with Excel I

Excel is one of the most common tools used for research data management and analysis.  Even researchers that use tools such as SAS or R often use Excel for data presentation or publication.  Recent mandates from Federal funding agencies regarding data management plans include guidelines that explicitly require that research data be published in machine-readable formats that are suitable for reuse.  However, Excel workbooks are often idiosyncratically organized, making data reuse a challenge.

This workshop will focus on strategies to help students better manage their data in Excel.  Topics that will be covered: 1) optimal data organization using the principals of "tidy" data (http://vita.had.co.nz/papers/tidy-data.pdf), working with text files, data validation, data filtering and metadata.  The skills learned in this workshop will enable students to prepare datasets suitable for publication.  Prerequisites: basic Excel skills such as data entry and use of simple formulas.

Intro to Data Management (formerly Data Management 1)

This overview will discuss the data deluge and why and where to start to manage research data. The session will look at how and where data management and data curation fit into the research lifecycle. Resources to help with data management will be covered. We drill down into issues and problems people have about data, data management, and sharing, so bring your data management questions to this discussion.

EndNote Basic for Education Students

EndNote Basic citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations.  With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions.  Additionally, EndNote has powerful sharing capabilities that make working with a group easy.  In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, Cite While You Write feature, and sharing with a group.  If possible, please bring your laptop.

Introduction to PURR (formerly Data Management 2)

One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to thesis/dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google) and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice.

Data Organization with Excel 2

Building on the skills learned in Excel 1, this workshop will introduce students to more advanced techniques to manage and manipulate data with Excel.  Topics that will be covered: 1) linking external data and 2) Pivot Tables and Charts and 3) Excel functions to create derived variables.  Prerequisites: Excel skills covered in Excel 1 Workshop.

Spatial Data Integration

Combining multiple datasets into the same application or database for visualization and analysis has become common practice in nearly every fields today. This workshop will focus on different skills and technologies to bring public domain datasets to maps for spatial visualization and analysis. Topics include publicly available spatial datasets, data integration skills, spatial visualization tools, and development skills. In addition, this workshop will prepare students to participate in the upcoming Purdue GIS development competition as part of the ESRI Development Center (EDC) program at Purdue University Libraries. Winners will be recognized nationally and have the opportunity to participate the national development summit.

Storage for Data Management & Sharing (formerly Data Management 3)

There are a plethora of resources that are available at Purdue and elsewhere for storing data, working with data, and sharing data.  It can be difficult to choose the most applicable solution for one’s data among all the possibilities.  Each resource, with its own strengths and limitations, satisfies the requirements of specific cases, and there is no resource that can fulfill all the needs of a researcher.  In this workshop, we will discuss the various resources for data management and sharing at Purdue and elsewhere, the criteria one can use for making rational choices, and if time permits, available tools for data transfer.

Introduction to Systematic Reviews

Are you part of a systematic review project?  What constitutes a systematic review can be confusing.  A systematic review is a research method that aims to answer a question by analyzing previous studies. In systematic reviews, the data to be analyzed are the literature (articles, chapters, conference papers) on a topic.  Other similar research methods are scoping, narrative and meta-analyses reviews.  Participants in this class will learn about these different review types and learn how to choose the appropriate type based on the research question and the resources available, including time and size of the research team. Common subject-related frameworks for breaking the research question into searchable ideas, such as PICO (medicine), SPICE (social sciences), CHIP (Psychology) will be discussed also.  This workshop is ideal for first-timers or PIs on a systematic or scoping review.

Retaining Your Copyright

This session describes the practical implications of retaining copyright for graduate students as they move into their future career. What are the tradeoffs that happen when you give your copyright to a publisher in exchange for publication? What are the benefits of retaining copyright for professional portfolios, teaching, and future research? How do you go about retaining copyright? How do you select journals that allow you to retain copyright?

Data Hand-off (formerly Data Management 4)

Joining a new lab or research project can be stressful, especially if you don't understand the data structures previously put in place by researchers who may no longer be affiliated with the project. This session will discuss ways in which to familiarize yourself with new data structures and ways to ensure your own data structure and organization can weather changes in staffing, versions, infrastructure, or software. Attendees will also learn the basics of digital preservation and how to keep your files (both personal and research) usable and accessible long-term. Bring your laptop to test new approaches and skills.

Storage for Data Management & Sharing

There are a plethora of resources that are available at Purdue and elsewhere for storing data, working with data, and sharing data.  It can be difficult to choose the most applicable solution for one’s data among all the possibilities.  Each resource, with its own strengths and limitations, satisfies the requirements of specific cases, and there is no resource that can fulfill all the needs of a researcher.  In this workshop, we will discuss the various resources for data management and sharing at Purdue and elsewhere, the criteria one can use for making rational choices, and if time permits, available tools for data transfer.

Data Management with REDCap

REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure, web-based application designed to support traditional case report form data capture, online surveys, systematic reviews and other data management needs for research studies. It is provided at no cost to the Purdue University community through the Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). This mini-workshop is designed to introduce REDCap users to data management best practices throughout the lifecycle of a research project. This is not an introduction to REDCap. For introductory tutorials please see the Indiana CTSI knowledge base link from the address below. Participants should register for a REDCap account prior to participating in the workshop. If you have not already requested an account, please do so at https://www.indianactsi.org/tools/redcap.

Predatory Journals

EndNote Desktop

EndNote Desktop citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations.  With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions.  Additionally, EndNote has powerful sharing capabilities that make working with a group easy.  In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, Cite While You Write feature, and sharing with a group.  If possible, please bring your laptop.

Zotero

Think of the last research paper you wrote. How many sources did you cite in it? How did you manage all of those references and sources? For large papers, you may need to keep track of dozens or even hundreds of sources. After doing your research, you can waste hours and hours getting your citations into the proper format, in the correct order in your paper, and listed in your bibliography.  Zotero is a free citation management program that can help you collect, organize, and share your research.  This session is designed to help graduate students get started with Zotero.  Attendees will learn how to set up Zotero, gather citations, and generate bibliographies.

Productivity Hacks: Tools and How-tos

Are you struggling to keep your information and research organized? Would your life be better with improved time management and prioritization? This session will share and demonstrate productivity and project management tools that can help graduate students optimize their workflows. Tools covered will include Trello, Evernote (free and premium), Dragon Naturally Speaking (free and paid), Google Drive, Keep, and Calendar, Asana, and more.

Data Organization with Excel 1

Excel is one of the most common tools used for research data management and analysis.  Even researchers that use tools such as SAS or R often use Excel for data presentation or publication.  Recent mandates from Federal funding agencies regarding data management plans include guidelines that explicitly require that research data be published in machine-readable formats that are suitable for reuse.  However, Excel workbooks are often idiosyncratically organized, making data reuse a challenge.

This workshop will focus on strategies to help students better manage their data in Excel.  Topics that will be covered: 1) optimal data organization using the principals of "tidy" data (http://vita.had.co.nz/papers/tidy-data.pdf), working with text files, data validation, data filtering and metadata.  The skills learned in this workshop will enable students to prepare datasets suitable for publication.  Prerequisites: basic Excel skills such as data entry and use of simple formulas.

Intro to citation management

A citation manager is a tool or software that can help you save, store, and manipulate your scholarly references. But which is best for you? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero and all of the others? If you have ever wondered about any of these questions, this is the session for you.  We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you.

The Data Analysis Mini-Hack Series with OpenRefine

Do you use research strategies like text mining, social networking analysis, or data cleaning in your research? In this series of workshops, we’ll demonstrate research tools and provide datasets for hands-on exploration. You’ll walk away with exposure to tools and techniques that support your research and a better idea of the support systems available through Purdue University Libraries.

OpenRefine: In this workshop, you’ll use OpenRefine to import data in various formats, easily explore large datasets, and clean and transform data with basic and advanced cell transformations.

Navigating the archival research process

You are in the reading room, you are staring at the collection, now what? This workshop will teach you how to approach archival research whether you are in the reading room for a day or two weeks. You will learn strategies for taking notes and photos and making observations. You will also learn how to approach any surprises or new directions you may encounter.

The Data Analysis Mini-Hack Series with Voyant Tools

In this workshop, you’ll use Voyant Tools, a web-based text reading and analysis environment to learn how computer-assisted analysis works, to study texts, and to add interactive evidence to essays and research published online.

Systematic Review #2 (Jason)

Are you part of a systematic review project?  What constitutes a systematic review can be confusing.  A systematic review is a research method that aims to answer a question by analyzing previous studies. In systematic reviews, the data to be analyzed are the literature (articles, chapters, conference papers) on a topic.  Other similar research methods are scoping, narrative and meta-analyses reviews.  Participants in this class will learn about these different review types and learn how to choose the appropriate type based on the research question and the resources available, including time and size of the research team. Common subject-related frameworks for breaking the research question into searchable ideas, such as PICO (medicine), SPICE (social sciences), CHIP (Psychology) will be discussed also.  This workshop is ideal for first-timers or PIs on a systematic or scoping review.

The Data Analysis Mini-Hack Series with Gephi

In this workshop, we’ll use Gephi, a visualization and exploration software, to promote scientific work with high-quality printable maps suitable for poster creations.

Conducting a Literature Review

A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find.

Deciding Where to Publish and Present

Are you having trouble choosing the best place to publish or present your work?  Which publications have the biggest impact?  This workshop will provide a general overview of factors to consider when choosing venues to publish and present.  We will include a discussion of available tools and resources you can use to gather information and make informed decisions.

Managing your archival research assets

You’ve just returned from a week at the archives. You have hundreds of photos, piles of notes, and dozens of citations. How do you make sure you can find what you need when the time comes to write your thesis? In this workshop, you will learn basic records management strategies for keeping yourself organized. You will also learn how to manage your citations, request high-quality reproductions of archival material, and receive the appropriate permissions for including the material in a publication.

Data Preservation: preserving your digital research

Once you have wrapped up a research project, it is important to ensure that your findings are accessible to you in the long-term. This workshop will give you strategies to preserve your own content and introduce tools which can help make the process of digital preservation easier.

BibTex

Are you a LaTeX user confused by citation management?  BibTex is reference management software that allows you to easily cite papers, create formatted bibliographies in your LaTeX documents, and connect to citation managers like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero.  This workshop will be an introduction to BibTeX, using the Overleaf platform licensed by Purdue.

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Overview of Research Integrity Issues and Policy
Why should all researchers and scholars consider research integrity to be a core value and personal responsibility? What is research misconduct? What should I do if I believe that I have witnessed Research Misconduct? These and other questions regarding ethical conduct of research will be addressed using a combination of lecture and case studies by Dr. Linda Mason, Associate Dean Graduate School. This is the perfect workshop for researchers wanting to clarify the grey areas we often find ourselves in when conducting research and publishing. It can be used to meet a requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Not available in Fall semester.

RCR: Research Integrity in Engineering and Technology - Authorship and Publications
This Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop focuses on Research Integrity as it relates to authorship and publications in the fields of Engineering and Technology. The presenters include Dr. Audeen Fentiman, Crowley Family Professor in Engineering Education and Associate Dean of Graduate Education and Interdisciplinary Programs and Joanne Lax, Graduate Student Tech. Communication Specialist. This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Pizza and drinks will be served at 11:45 - please arrive before the speaker begins at noon, if you wish to eat, so as not to disrupt the conversation. Pre-registration is encouraged so an appropriate amount of food will be available.

RCR: Ethics of Human Subject Research and the IRB Process
This Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop focuses on Research Integrity as it relates to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and human subject research. Dr. Nancy Hathaway, JD, CIP, the IRB administrator associated with Purdue’s Human Research Projection Program, will examine the ethics associated with using humans and other vertebrate subjects in our research projects. An attorney by trade, Hathaway has extensive experience in human subject protection ethics. This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Not available in Fall semester.

RCR: Research Ethics and Data Management in Physical Sciences
This Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop focuses on Research Integrity as it relates to data management and research ethics in the Physical Sciences. Dr. George Bodner, the Arthur Kelly Distinguished Professor in Chemical Education, will discuss the various ethical decisions we make during the course of a research career, including publications, who owns my data, what happens when I leave my program and how do I determine authorship in my field. He will offer some insight into how these dilemmas might be resolved. This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies.

RCR: What You Should Understand About Copyright Before Publishing Your Research
Dr. Donna Ferullo, J.D., University Copyright Office will address the ethical copyright issues associated with publishing your research work. What is copyright? What are copyright requirements? What are copyrightable works? What are the exceptions to the copyright laws? Where does it fit in the research cycle? What is the Fair Use Doctrine? Where does plagiarism fit into this concept? Dr. Ferullo will cover these important topics and more. Come prepared for questions. It can be used to meet a requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies.

RCR: Responsible Authorship and Publication in Liberal Arts & Humanities
Dr. Ralph Webb, Professor in the Brian Lamb School of Communication will lead a discussion on the ethical concerns surrounding publication in the fields of Liberal Arts and Humanities. Dr. Webb will address such issues as Why publish? What are the differences in publishing in the humanities vs. STEM fields? Should you be sole author or is it better to co–author? How do you start the publishing process? Come prepared with questions. This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Pizza and drinks will be served at 11:45 - please arrive before the speaker begins at noon, if you wish to eat, so as not to disrupt the conversation. Pre-registration is encouraged so an appropriate amount of food will be available.

Research Integrity in the Life Sciences - Authorship and Publication
Dr. James Mohler, Associate Dean of Graduate Education and Professor of Entomology will address hot topics including: How do you determine authorship on a publication? What are the rules for publication? Who owns the data? What are the rules associated with research misconduct? What really is plagiarism? This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Pizza and drinks will be served at 11:45 - please arrive before the speaker begins at noon, if you wish to eat, so as not to disrupt the conversation. Pre-registration is encouraged so an appropriate amount of food will be available.

RCR: Research Ethics and Integrity
This Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop focuses on the science and practice of research integrity, as well as Purdue policy and regulation on research ethics. Dr. Deborah Rupp, Research Integrity Officer and the William C. Byham Chair in Industrial-Organizational Psychology will examine the ethics associated with conducting research at Purdue in alignment with the code of conduct associated with research from design to publication. This workshop can be used to meet the requirement of face-to-face ethics training required of many departments, colleges, and granting agencies. Not available for Fall semester.

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Improve Techniques for the Researcher - October 20th, 2016
No comedy skills needed but a willingness to improve your communication, active listening and engagement skills is critical.
Improvisation will teach you about heightening your awareness and improved your listening skills. It is more about connecting with your audience, than acting skills. It can also help you hone your key messages
when speaking time is short at conferences and can actually increase the quality of the audience-speaker interaction

Story Telling 101 - November 2nd, 2016
Storytelling is one of the most powerful ways to share your research knowledge with others in an engaging, memorable format. Stories are powerful and can connect you with an audience in ways that you might never connect with traditional presentation techniques. It can make your arguments more persuasive and transfer more information. If your presentations are more of a spewing of facts, rather than a cohesive story, this workshop is for you. In this workshop we will create a few key stepping stones that you can use to progress through your story and work on the hook that will get an audience interested in your message early and keep them interested to the conclusion.

Engaging Presentations & Distilling Your Message - November 15th, 2016
Do you ever get caught in “lecture mode” when presenting your work? Do you find many researchers you listen to lose their energy, enthusiasm and ability to engage you the longer they talk? Do you feel an obligation
to let society know what you are doing and why? If so, come learn techniques for creating engaging presentation. These tips will not only work for talking with the public and the news media, but also increasing the engagement quality of job seminars and conference presentations. One workshop might not make you an outstanding communicator, but you should be able to recognize when you are not communicating well and how to get back on track.

3 Minute Thesis Overview: What does a winning presentation look like? - February 1st and 16th, 2017
Forget all you know about giving scientific presentations – a 3 Minute Thesis audience is different. You must have an emotional argument to support your scientific argument.
In this workshop we will explore why researchers have to communicate with the general public and we will cover the basics of what it takes to prepare a winning 3 minute thesis presentation that is accessible, visually appealing, and engaging

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