Got Nature? Blog

Posted on November 17th, 2015 in Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »

Robert Cordes Got Nature’s podcasts are a great way to learn about wildlife, forestry, and conservation issues from the experts themselves. The information they provide can be a much more valuable and reliable resource than simply searching the internet. Frequent Got Nature podcast contributor Bob Cordes emphasized this as he was featured in a Franklin, Indiana Sun Journal article titled “Wilton biologist discusses wildlife on Purdue University podcasts.”

Bob Cordes is an assistant regional wildlife biologist with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife, and collaborates with Associate Professor of Wildlife Ecology Rod Williams to provide podcast listeners with answers to common and not-so-common wildlife questions and concerns. Cordes started working with Got Nature podcasts in the episode “Wildlife Pictures Worth a Thousand Words“, where he is interviewed by Dr. Williams about how to use trail cameras to view wildlife. More recently, Cordes has been involved with the weekly “Boiler Up! for Wildlife” series.

Check out the Got Nature podcasts featuring Bob Cordes below to learn more from his expertise in wildlife biology.

The Got Nature podcast page has these and more informative podcasts available to listen to for free, and they are also available through iTunes.
Robert Cordes, Assistant Regional Biologist
Main Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife
Rod Williams​, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University

Posted on October 9th, 2015 in Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »
Geese

Photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Digital Library

For this podcast we discuss the fall migration of our feathered reptiles, also known as birds. Just about anywhere you are this time of year, you might notice flocks of birds forming in the sky or new visitors on your bird feeders. My guest this week is Dr. Barny Dunning, an avid birder and an ornithologist at Purdue University. He is without question our resident expert on anything related to birds.

Our host, Dr. Rod Williams, will discuss the patterns of bird migration, how weather affects the timing and during of migration, and ask Dr. Dunning about some of the most spectacular migrations in the region.

Listen here:
Boiler Up for Wildlife: Flying South for the Winter, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources:
Indiana Audubon Society
Birds of Benton County, Indiana, Purdue Extension-The Education Store
Breeding Birds and Forest Management: the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment and the Central Hardwoods Region, The Education Store

Dr. John “Barny” Dunning, Professor of Wildlife Ecology
Department of Forestry & Natural Resources, Purdue University

Dr. Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on October 1st, 2015 in Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »
White-Tailed Deer Warts

Photo credit: Jeff Gurney

​Deer season is upon us. Many of us are habitually checking our trial cameras, spending hours watching deer from our stands, or scanning the woods through binoculars and spotting scopes. By viewing wildlife in this way, it’s possible to detect anomalies found on certain individuals.  For this week’s podcast we are going to be discussing wart-like growths, called fibromas, on white-tailed deer.

Our host, Dr. Rod Williams, will be talking with a regular on the show, Bob Cordes, about fibromas.  Bob will discuss what causes the fibromas, how they impact infected animals, how they are transmitted, and what to do if you harvest a deer with fibromas.

Listen here:
Boiler Up for Wildlife: Deer Warts, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources:
Age Determination in the White-tailed Deer video, The Education Store-Purdue Extension Resource Center
Boiler Up For Wildlife: Fall outbreaks of EHD and Blue Tongue in deer, Got Nature? Podcast
Food Plots for White-tailed Deer, The Education Store
How to Score Your White-tailed Deer, The Education Store

Robert Cordes, Assistant Regional Biologist
Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on September 25th, 2015 in How To, Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »

Skunk, Boiler Up! For Wildlife: What dug up my yard podcast

Photo by: Zoe Glas

​This is our weekly segment where I talk with wildlife biologists about current wildlife issues. For this week’s Boiler Up! For Wildlife podcast we will discuss a common summer and fall phenomenon that happens to a lot of homeowner’s yard. You walk outside and something has completely dug up your beautifully landscaped yard. My guest this week is Bob Cordes, a wildlife biologist from Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

In this episode, Bob will discuss why animals, like skunks, are attracted to your yard, how to remove the source of food wildlife are seeking from your soil, and things to consider when treating your lawn.

Listen here:
Boiler Up For Wildlife: What is digging up my yard?, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources:
Trapping Nuisance Wildlife, Got Nature?, Purdue Forestry and Natural Resources
Preventing Wildlife Damage – Do You Need a Permit?, Purdue Extension-The Education Store
Indiana Wildlife Conflicts Information​, Purdue Univeristy, IDNR, USDA
Indiana DNR Nuisance Wildlife​, IDNR

Robert Cordes, Assistant Regional Biologist
Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on September 10th, 2015 in How To, Podcasts, Wildlife | 1 Comment »

I am very excited to introduce listeners to a brand new segment on the Got Nature? Podcast series called “Boiler Up For Wildlife.” This is a weekly segment where I talk with wildlife biologists about current wildlife issues. For this week’s podcast, we are going to be discussing disease issues associated with White-tailed Deer. My first guest is a regular on the show, a good friend of mine and a Purdue alum.

In this episode, Bob Cordes, a wildlife biologist with Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, discusses a common set of viruses that affect White-tailed Deer across much of the United States. These diseases are known as Hemorrhagic Diseases, specifically Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease and Blue Tongue Virus. Bob will discuss disease vectors, symptoms and impacts to deer populations.

Listen here:
Boiler Up For Wildlife: Fall outbreaks of EHD and Blue Tongue in Deer, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources
Age Determination in the White-tailed Deer video, The Education Store-Purdue Extension Resource Center
Food Plots for White-tailed Deer
, The Education Store
How to Score Your White-tailed Deer
, The Education Store

Bob Cordes, Assistant Regional Wildlife Biologist
Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on August 24th, 2015 in Forestry, Gardening, Plants, Podcasts, Urban Forestry | No Comments »

What's a GMO? Making Trees Stronger, Got Nature podcastThe first topic in the series on the genetics behind trees focused on tree improvement. In this podcast, we are going to focus on the genetic modification of trees. Please join us as our host Rod Williams discusses this topic with Dr. Shaneka Lawson.  Dr. Lawson is a research plant physiologist with the USDA Forest Service-Northern Research Station.​

Listen here:
What is a GMO? Making Trees Stronger, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources:
Transgenic Papaya in Hawaii and Beyond, genetic modification to papaya, The Journal of Agrobiotechnology Management & Economics

Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Shaneka Lawson, USDA Forest Service-Research Plant Physiologist & FNR Adjunct Assistant Professor
USDA Forest Service-Northern Research Station

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on July 14th, 2015 in Forestry, Podcasts | No Comments »

Walnut trees. Forests are more than just trees. Our forests represent a complex ecosystem that is constantly changing over time. This complex system and the associated research involved to understand it is the focus of the next series of podcasts.

Our topic in this series focuses on The Genetics of Growing Trees, specifically on tree improvement. Join us as our host Dr. Rod Williams interviews Dr. Keith Woeste to discuss Hardwood Tree Improvement. Dr. Woeste is a research geneticist in the Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center housed at Purdue University. HTIRC is a research unit in the Northern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service.

Listen here:
The Genetics Behind Growing Trees, Got Nature? Podcasts
iTunes – Got Nature? Podcasts

Resources
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Keith Woeste, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC)
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Rainscaping Our newest podcast titled Rainscaping is focused on ways to manage excess water in your yard or neighborhood and thus, minimizing polluted runoff from reaching our waterways. Putting water to work for us in a sustainable way is the focus on Purdue’s new Rainscaping program. Join us as our host Dr. Rod Williams learns from Kara Salazar about this new initiative. Kara is a Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist within the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and is co-chair of the Purdue Rainscaping Education Program.

Listen here:
Rainscaping, Got Nature? Podcast, MP3 file.
iTunes – Got Nature?

Resources
Purdue Rainscaping Education Program, Purdue Agriculture
Rain Barrels, Purdue Rainscaping Education Program, Purdue Agriculture
Sustainable Communities, Purdue University Extension
Climate Change: How Will You Manage Stormwater Runoff?, The Education Store

Kara Salazar, Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources & Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant

John Orick, Purdue Master Gardener State Coordinator
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture


Posted on March 27th, 2015 in Aquaculture/Fish, Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »
Dr. Shem Unger holds a giant salamander.

Dr. Shem Unger holds a giant salamander.

​Giant salamanders are sensitive to changes in their aquatic environment. Perhaps one of the most significant factors influencing their livelihoods is the quality of their habitat. In previous podcasts, we heard how water temperatures can influence hellbender immune system and foraging ecology. In this podcast, our guest host, Dr. Steve Kimble, will be interviewing Dr. Shem Unger regarding his work on the effects of sedimentation on the physiology of juvenile eastern hellbenders.

Listen here:
Giant Salamanders Part 3: Studying Young Giants, Got Nature? Podcast
iTunes – Got Nature?

To contact Dr. Unger:
Email: unger@srel.uga.edu
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

Other resources:
HelptheHellbender.org

Steve Kimble, Post Doc Research Assistant
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Posted on March 11th, 2015 in Aquaculture/Fish, Podcasts, Wildlife | No Comments »
Scientists placing hellbender concrete nest box in water.

Kaitlynn Samborsky and Joe Greathouse putting concrete nest boxes, created by our partners in the Sustainable Prison Program, in a stream in West Virginia. Photo by Grace Winzeler.

Eastern hellbenders have been in decline across many regions of the eastern United States. The Midwest has shown some of the most significant declines in hellbender populations. Current conservation efforts in West Virginia and Ohio include eDNA surveys, establishing habitat corridors and captive rearing and release programs.

Hellbender in concrete nest box.

Hellbender in concrete nest box.

In this podcast, our guest host, Dr. Steve Kimble, will be interviewing Joe Greathouse about how variability in water temperatures may influence the foraging ecology in these giant salamanders. Joe is the director of conservation science at The Wilds in Ohio.

Listen here:
Giant Salamanders Part 2: Climate Change and Foraging Ecology, Got Nature? Podcast
iTunes – Got Nature?

To contact Joe Greathouse:
Email: jgreathouse@thewilds.org
The Wilds

Other resources:
HelptheHellbender.org

Rod Williams, Associate Professor of Wildlife Science
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University


Got Nature?

Archives