USDOT Region V Regional University Transportation Center

Research in Progress

2013-2014 Projects

  • Developing Operational and Policy Insights into Next Generation Vehicle Needs Based on an Integrated Understanding of the Transportation and Energy System of Systems

    Research Information (pdf)

    RiP Database

    Status: Active

    Summary of Research

    Rapidly evolving transportation and energy technology is opening up a tremendous number of possibilities for simultaneously achieving environmental sustainability, economic development, and energy security, but the many possibilities for their interaction greatly complicate analysis to understand the best policy options and strategies for individuals and companies to take to maximize opportunities.

    This project proposes to explore the effects of various vehicle design options and more detailed vehicle behavior on the integrated transportation and energy system, with particular interest in studying the effect of vehicle design options on traffic system behavior and fuel and electricity use. The study proposes augmenting the use of MPO data to incorporate the detailed behavior of drivers, new vehicle capabilities, and advanced information systems. The resulting agent based model will be suitable for investigating transportation system behavior under next generation systems and its interaction with the energy system.

  • Analysis of Policies Aimed at Increasing Use of Natural Gas in the Transportation System

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

     

    The major objective of this research is to evaluate a series of natural gas for transportation policy options and to compare them with existing options for electric vehicles, biofuels, CAFE standards, etc.  The policy incentives that will be considered are:  1)incentives to create natural gas fueling stations, 2)subsidies for natural gas vehicles comparable to the benefits provided to the country from their use, 3)incentives for retrofitting gasoline vehicles for conversion to CNG, and 5)incentives for fleet adoption of CNG. 

  • Field Data Based Data Fusion Methodologies to Estimate Dynamic Origin-Destination Demand Matrices from Multiple Sensing and Tracking Technologies

    UTC Project Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    Recent advances in real-time traffic sensing, including GPS data from probe vehicles, automatic vehicle identification using RFID and Bluetooth sensors, and automatic number plate recognition, provide richer data when combined with traditional O-D estimation techniques. However, the data obtained from these different sensors do not convey similar information on the traffic conditions of the network. This project seeks to develop and test a systematic methodology to integrate the different data sources, also labeled data fusion, to address the O-D estimation problem, leveraging the availability of different types of data with disparate characteristics.

    The study will involve collecting data from ITS test-bed corridors in Chennai (Madras), India. The data collected will also serve as a benchmark data archive for O-D estimation techniques and will augment ongoing research to develop dynamic O-D demand matrices based on partial observability of the field network.

  • Estimation of Time-Dependent Intersection Turning Proportions for Adaptive Traffic Signal Controls  -or-  Estimation of Time-Dependent Intersection Turning Proportions for Adaptive Traffic Signal Control under Limited Link Traffic Counts from Heterogeneous Sensors

    UTC Project Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    This research seeks to estimate time-dependent intersection turning proportions using partial link traffic counts and observed turning proportions provided by heterogeneous sensor technologies.

    It will help transportation/highway management agencies determine a desirable sensor deployment plan in terms of how to prioritize the critical links for different sensor characteristics under an annual budget constraint. It will also illustrate that interdependencies arise between information and infrastructure in relation to the vehicles, and that they lead to complexities that require solutions as technology is increasingly leveraged in conjunction with the limited budgets. In terms of broader significance, several methodological approaches involving network-level solutions developed to leverage ITS technologies have been previously limited in terms of real-world deployment due to the unavailability of such O-D matrices. Hence, the proposed research has key practical implications for transportation agencies.

  • Information and Transportation Choices, Long- and Short-Term, that Link Sustainability and Livability

    UTC Project Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The research is designed to test:

    a. The sensitivity of the long-term decision of residential location choice to information;

    b. The sensitivity of short-term travel behavior to long-term residential location choice.

    Rare among policy investigations, information-related questions can be researched through true experimental designs. This project proposes to assign movers in the two cities randomly to control and experimental groups. Experimental groups in Ann Arbor, MI and Lafayette, IN will be exposed to an information-delivery strategy designed to address transportation-relevant decision-making over a range of time scales. Control and experimental groups will be surveyed for transportation-related outcomes, and intergroup differences will be analyzed with standard statistical models to determine treatment effects.

    This project proposes to study how travelers’ long- and short-term transportation-related decisions are affected by information interventions, providing potentially new perspectives to fostering sustainable transportation choices and bridging methodological gaps in holistically approaching the notion of livability.

    Current strategies for the dissemination of transportation information concentrate at the short-term end of the spectrum. Not enough is known about the sensitivity of choices at varying time scales to information interventions or about the “downstream” impact of longer-term choices on those made over the shorter term. This project will develop new decision-making models informed by multiple disciplines, including cognitive science, behavioral economics, marketing, transportation, and urban planning. The project will design information interventions intended for the full range of transportation-relevant decisions and test their impacts on people moving to Ann Arbor, Michigan, and West Lafayette, Indiana, as well as consumers in the market for a vehicle.

  • Truck Activity and Wait Times at International Border Crossings

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    Determining the times trucks incur at international border crossings is of interest to the private freight industry and to the border crossing facility operators and planners.  Private carriers and shippers can benefit from having objective travel time measures for trip planning, scheduling, and routing. Facilities operators and planners can detect when conditions warrant changes in operations or infrastructure.  Private and public stakeholders at two of the busiest international truck crossings in North America, both of which are situated in Region 5, do not have access to such travel time data.

  • Impact of passenger transportation modes, travel choices, and urban geography on CO2 emissions

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The primary objectives of continuing the investigation of the effects of various factors on passenger transportation CO2 emissions are to: (a) further expand the dataset to effectively improve the reliability and wider applicability of the relationships of interest, (b) address the transit utilization limitation and additional travel and regulation characteristics, and (c) broaden the scenario analyses based on the improved models to capture joint factor effects and to demonstrate their use as a policy-making support tool.

  • LIDAR Based Vehicle Classification

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    Vehicle classification data are used in many transportation applications, including: planning, pavement design, environmental impact studies, traffic control, and traffic safety. Every state in the US maintains a network of vehicle classification stations to explicitly sort vehicles into several classes based on observable features, e.g., length, number of axles, axle spacing, etc. Various technologies are used for this automated classification, the three most common approaches are: weigh in motion (WIM); axle-based classification from a combination of loop detectors, piezoelectric sensors or pneumatic sensors; and length-based classification from dual loop detectors. All of these sensor technologies suffer from the difficulty of deploying and maintaining in/on pavement sensors. There has recently been an increasing interest in developing non-intrusive sensors to classify vehicles, e.g., there are several non-intrusive sensors now on the market that offer vehicle classification and most of these sensors rely on microwave radar (e.g., RTMS, SmartSensor, etc.). 

    The research will deploy LIDAR based system using high vantage points (10-30 m) at one or more multi-lane facilities to monitor traffic and overcome the current limitation due occlusions. In addition to algorithm development, the research will include extensive, labor-intensive ground truth data extraction, both for development and validation of the algorithms. The budget and scope of the work is for the task of developing the LIDAR based system.

  • ?Transit Origin-Destination Flow Estimation Considering Temporal Variations based on APC Data

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    This project builds upon the progress made by the NEXTRANS investigators in using APC data from transit buses to estimate route-level OD flows considering a variety of new dimensions and identified limitations. Specifically, these efforts relate to the temporal representation of OD flows.

    Route-level bus passenger OD flow estimation methods recently developed by the NEXTRANS investigators are presently being used to provide insights on empirical flow patterns for a few transit agencies. The research here is targeted to improve upon these applications for sustained, long-term use. As was done in moving the recently developed approaches toward empirical implementation, methodological formulations must be developed, evaluated, and refined before being put into use. The advanced methods eventually developed would form the basis for long-term benefits to transit agencies and MPOs.

    The methods being developed are based on exploiting spatially and temporally extensive boarding and alighting data that are now available from APC technologies in use on many transit properties. As with previously developed methods, the new methods will be inspired by an understanding of bus passenger behavior that is consistent with data and in situ observations collected on OSU’s living Campus Transit Lab and refined according to these data and observations.

    The developed methods will lead to a richer representation of OD flow patterns and more accurate estimates of such patterns. In both cases, improved service planning and operations, where OD flow patterns are used as inputs, are expected. Planning applications include, for example, extending, splitting or combining, and designing new routes, and operations applications include short-turning, expressing, and holding. Improved service and operations will eventually result in a more competitive transit mode, with subsequent effects on reduced congestion, improved sustainable use of energy resources, and mitigated environmental impacts stemming from passenger travel

  • Using Naturalistic Driving Performance Data to Develop an Empirically Defined Model of Distracted Driving

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    Approximately 33,000 fatalities and over 2.2 million nonfatal injuries result from motor vehicle crashes each year in the United States, with a total cost that exceeded $US230 billion in 2009 alone (NHTSA, 2010a). In 2009, 16% of fatal crashes and 20% of non-fatal injury crashes included reports of distracted driving (NHTSA, 2010b). Findings from the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study suggested that 22% of all crashes and near-crashes were related to secondary-task distraction (Klauer, 2006). The measurement of driver distraction is a challenge. Driver self-assessment of distraction is inaccurate, observational studies can only detect observable distractions, and naturalistic driving studies are costly. The prevention of distraction-related crashes requires a better understanding of the nature of driver distraction. This, in turn, requires a means to accurately assess the occurrence and degree of driver distraction in large samples. The goal of this project is to identify kinematic indicators of distracted driving for devising a model that would allow distracted driving to be measured using technological approaches. The result will be a new definition of distracted driving that is based on measureable kinematic variables. This ability would facilitate an epidemiologic approach to studying driver distraction, as well as contribute to potential warning systems that redirect distracted drivers’ attention back to the task of driving.

  • Standardized Metrics for Accessibility: Establishing a Federal Policy-Relevant Knowledge Base

    UTC Project Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    Transportation planning and policy has traditionally been evaluated with metrics of mobility, such as highway level-of-service or time lost to delay. Standardized metrics of mobility are abundantly available to planners and engineers through such widely used resources as the Highway Capacity Manual and the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. Standardized data about mobility facilitate consistent evaluations of transportation outcomes across both time and place. The purpose of transportation, however, is not movement but access, and ubiquitous reliance on mobility-based evaluation has tended to favor—via both transportation and land-use planning--low-density, auto oriented development patterns. A shift to accessibility-based metrics can help alter this trend, and can better align planning practice with transportation’s fundamental purpose. Yet no standardized metrics are currently available to assist decision makers about progress on accessibility. This project seeks to understand how a standardized set of data generated by regional agencies might be collected in a repository to facilitate consistent and dependable accessibility-based analysis among places and through time. Tasks include assessing the current state of standardized transportation data, documenting the range of current practice with regard to the needed inputs to accessibility analysis, and developing a framework for standardizing the inputs to accessibility metrics. The objective is to provide assistance to federal agencies in modify their procedures for data collection and publication and for Metropolitan Planning Organizations and local governments to gain the capacity to compare their outcomes over time to other peers. 

  • Mapping New Mobility Business, Innovation, and Employment Opportunities in Michigan: Developing a Data-Driven Graphic Platform for Assessing and Advancing Laboratory Development and Entrepreneurship Opportunities in Urban Regions

    Research Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    This work will develop a data-driven mapping platform for assessing local and regional economic development, employment, entrepreneurship, and industry cluster development opportunities related to New Mobility, starting with southeast Michigan as the initial prototype area. The mapping activity will assemble through a GIS-based toolset, a dynamic visualization and geospatialization platform to illuminate existing material and economic flows between related sector agents, as well as to identify network gaps via methodologies related to value-chain mapping.

    In general, this suite of network visualization tools relates specifically to New Mobility industry and enterprise, fills an important analysis gap and will result in more informed decision making and innovation by governments, large business, entrepreneurs and other innovators. The work addresses the specific interests of project partners by integrating diverse sets of data and interrelations that operate within ‘blind spots’ of individual sector participants. The tools proposed for development aim to result in more informed decision-making and risk assessment in emerging sectors, while identifying the priority strategic actions Michigan policy and business leadership can advance that support the growth of the new mobility industry sector in Michigan. The proposed tools will be developed with the intent that process and product can be scaled and translated to other sites and globally.

  • Use of Comparative Efficiency Analysis to Optimize Transportation Infrastructure

    Research Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The main purpose of this research is to present an analysis of an alternative strategy for optimizing transportation infrastructure maintenance decision-making. The approach being proposed is based on performance-based resource analysis, which balances competing objectives and perspectives of multiple stakeholder groups while considering the amount of resources available, as described in NCHRP Report 666. Performance-based analysis focuses on the concept of spending efficiencies and performance-based resource allocation. It also encourages the use of performance targets and the ways to develop and maintain them over time. Performance targets have to become a part of the business process that directly links organizational goals and objectives to available resources and results. In performance-based resource analysis, targets are critical when evaluating the effectiveness of investment decisions.

    The primary benefit of this research is that it empowers maintenance administrators in state transportation agencies with a new and innovative integrated solution to make decisions and set policies related to transportation infrastructure maintenance. The result of this research provides an alternative way to look at how efficient maintenance spending has been, and gives maintenance administrators a chance to figure out the most efficient way to allocate and distribute maintenance funds.

  • Stationary LiDAR for Traffic and Safety Applications – Vehicles Interpretation and Tracking

    Research Information (pdf)

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The project aims to develop a data processing module for a novel LiDAR-based traffic scanner - TScan. The TScan is being developed by the Center for Road Safety to collect microscopic highly accurate traffic data at road intersections. TScan uses Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology. This technology can detect various types of road users including buses, cars, pedestrians, and bicycles and, unlike video detection, it does not experience the well-known occlusion problem. The system consists of the LiDAR HDL-64E manufactured by the LiDAR Division of Velodyne Acoustics, Inc. installed on a pneumatic 42-foot telescoping mast elevated above the ground and positioned near a studied intersection. The sensor head rotates 900 times per minute, which results in 1.3 million data points per second. Data collected over a period of several hours to several days is stored in high-capacity devices. The system has been designed and all the components of the TScan system have been purchased or manufactured.

    The proposed effort covers the first phase of the overall effort. The second phase (not included in this proposal) will immediately follow the first one and it is meant to demonstrate the quality and usefulness of the obtained data for traffic conflict analysis. This phase will build an interface between the already developed data processing module and the existing Surrogate Safety Assessment Model (SSAM), which is freely available public domain software developed by Siemens ITS with FHWA funding. SSAM will convert the microscopic traffic information produced with TScan into meaningful safety-related information such as traffic conflicts and other risky interactions. 

    The proposed research component focuses on developing a module capable of converting the source data into the microscopic measurements of the motion of identified objects across the field of view in a way to make it useful for more advanced analysis. Although the HDL64E unit in our possession was found useful for autonomous driving, it is still not clear if it can measure the dimensions and motion of objects at a sufficient level of quality for the envisioned applications. This is our primary research objective besides developing the data process to facilitate the required data conversion.  

  • Driving Simulator Laboratory: Traveler Behavior Modeling and Interactive Experiments to Address Mobility and Safety Needs

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The Purdue Driving Simulator Laboratory (DSL) will be a quasi-living laboratory for mobility and safety research, interactive learning, and outreach. The DSL will develop behavioral and operational models and assess impacts to address current and emerging needs of the USDOT, state and local DOTs, and private sector firms in the information and locational services domains.

    It seeks to address fundamental questions related to the costs-benefits of infrastructure investment in advanced traveler information based management systems, the explicit quantification of the psychological impacts of information provision, traveler behavior to develop effective operational road-space management strategies, evacuee behavior under large-scale disasters, and the holistic understanding of real-time information provision and dissemination mechanisms from the mobility and safety perspectives.

    The ability to quantify physical and psychological benefits of real-time information has several dimensions of significant impact for practitioners and researchers. The proposed experiments will enable development of realistic behavior models and understanding of the benefits and safety implications associated with information provision and road space management strategies

  • Accessibility-Based Evaluation of Transportation and Land-Use Planning: From Laboratory to Practice

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The project will be informed by lessons derived from a previous multi-year project at the University of Michigan that measured regional accessibility among the top 50 metropolitan regions of the United States, and will proceed in four interrelated stages: A. Research political and technical barriers to the adoption of accessibility-based evaluation. Practitioners and decision makers in land-use and transportation planning will be studied to assess the relative role of political, institutional, and technical barriers to the adoption of accessibility-based evaluation. These may include, for example, difficulties in data acquisition or processing, the persistence of professional standards based in mobility evaluation, or perceived incompatibility with political interests. Interactions with practitioners and decision makers may take the form of interviews, focus groups, or surveys. This section will study both decision-making environments lacking in accessibility-based evaluation and those in which some accessibility evaluation has been adopted. B. Develop case studies of accessibility- and mobility-based evaluation. The impact of the alternative approaches to evaluation will be documented through selected case studies of each approach. The project will seek to understand how the two approaches affect public-sector decision making, actions by private-sector developers and other actors; and physical outcomes. Physical outcomes will be represented through visual analysis techniques and three dimensional diagrams to emphasize the built-form consequences, spatial typologies, and spatial performance characteristics resulting from alternative policy approaches. Impacts on decision-making will be presented through narrative case studies chosen to illustrate the workings of accessibility- and mobility-based evaluation on transportation and land-use decision making under a range of circumstances. C. Develop approaches to incorporating accessibility-based evaluation.The project’s working assumption is that engineers and planners in practice lack readily implementable approaches to determining the desirability of both land-use and transportation projects in accessibility terms. The project will develop qualitative, quantitative, and graphical tools to assist practitioners in their accessibility-based evaluation of these projects. The qualitative approaches will be based on the case studies and will be designed to help engineers and planners interpret from context the accessibility impact of transportation and land-use developments. A set of guidelines will be developed from consistent patterns that emerge from analysis of the case studies. The quantitative approaches will define metrics of accessibility that would be implementable in practice based on readily available data. Example calculations will be demonstrated and linked to the qualitative and graphical approaches. The graphical approaches will systematically investigate both site and situation to demonstrate attributes of location and design that shape accessibility outcomes, and may take the form of street-level photographs, aerial photography, three-dimensional models, or interactive mapping. D. Collaborate with practitioners and decision-makers on assessment of accessibility-based evaluation. The utility of approaches described above will be assessed through interviews and focus groups with practitioners. This will require designing written, web-based, or in-person presentations of the approaches to accessibility-based evaluation that will enable practitioners to understand and respond meaningfully to the suggestions. This will afford the project the opportunity to refine the approaches to enhance their relevance and implementability.

  • Campus Transit Laboratory: Infrastructure for Research, Education, and Outreach

    Research Information pdf

    RiP Database
    Status: Active
    Summary of Research

    The Ohio State University (OSU) Campus Transit Laboratory (CTL) is a living laboratory that provides the infrastructure for integrated transit-related research investigations, educational activities, and applied studies. The CTL benefits from advanced automatic data collection and information technologies deployed on the OSU Campus Area Bus Service (CABS), accessibility of the CABS system and the OSU community to researchers, instructors, and students for data collection and in situ observations, and regular interaction between CTL investigators and CABS operators and decision makers. This NEXTRANS project would continue to: -Sustain, develop, and showcase the CTL -Collect, process, and archive CTL data -Exploit the CTL for research, education, and outreach activities -Develop collaborations with transit agencies and investigators.

2012-2013 Projects

  • A Decision Support Tool to Locate Shelters in Emergency Logistics

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/12
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $216,366
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigators: Satish Ukkusuri, Purdue University; Yanfeng Ouyang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    One way to deal with response time during a disaster is by improving preparedness. Preparedness involves the activities intended to help communities respond for any possible disaster. One of these activities requires the adequate location of distribution centers and facilities that will enhance the response time and ensure coverage of the affected region. To this end, researchers will focus on identifying a strategic set of locations for a pre-specified number of facilities. This project will propose an innovative decision support tool which considers the traffic network congestion and the in-facility congestion at the shelters on the supply side in addition to social factors which influence the choice of shelters from the demand side. These facilities could be used as distribution centers for critical supplies in an area, with enough capacity to assure coverage and minimize response time in case of a disaster.

  • Exploring the Opportunities and Barriers to Intermodal Rail Freight

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 09/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $117,414
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Bruce Cox, TransWorks, Inc.

    Summary of Research

    This study seeks to explore the opportunities and barriers to maximize rail line-haul capabilities and expand the types of equipment utilized in intermodal rail freight operations, so that systematic steps can be identified to propose solutions for the rail freight sector to harmonize their capabilities for collaborative intermodal rail-truck transportation. Since such collaboration is typically market-driven, the study will analyze the commodities transported using the trucking sector to identify where win-win propositions exist for the rail and trucking sectors through collaboration. Further, it will examine the roles of government policy and the increasing emphasis on green transportation as potential additional catalysts for such collaboration.

  • Integrated Framework to Capture the Interdependence Between Transportation and Energy Sectors Due to Policy Decisions

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 09/01/2012
    Status: Active
    RiP Database:
    Total Dollars: $146,768
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This study intends to build upon previous work in the field of general equilibrium by developing an analytical framework that integrates the transportation and energy sectors in terms of their interdependencies, and policy instruments, to provide a quantitative tool that can analyze the long-term effects of different types of transportation policies (such as pricing, and various other demand-side or supply-side ones) on the energy sector. The tool will also aim to capture the qualitative evolution of transportation systems due to specific policy decisions related to energy usage or energy mandates (such as fuel efficiency rating of vehicles, and those related to blended fuels and alternative fuels, etc.).

  • Integrated Deployment Architecture for Predictive Real-Time Traffic Routing Incorporating Human Factors Considerations

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 09/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $146,768
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Xuesong Zhou, University of Utah

    Summary of Research

    This study seeks to develop an integrated deployment architecture for predictive real-time traffic routing that considers the human factors aspects related to information processing. It has multiple dimensions of research: (i) developing predictive routing algorithms by combining historical and instantaneous traffic feeds as well as employing behavioral models in real-time, (ii) data fusion from multiple sources to obtain reliable estimates of traffic flow conditions, (iii) developing a mechanism for personalized travel information to travelers based on their individual preferences and attitudes; that is, behaviorally-consistent information, and (iv) identifying information dissemination mechanisms that are safe from the perspective of human factors related to information processing while driving.

  • Design of Personal Rapid Transit Networks for Transit-Oriented Development Cities

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 09/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $117,414
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Jeong Whon Yu, Ajou University, Korea

    Summary of Research

    This study seeks to address the transit network design problem which identifies the optimal route and location of stations considering user behavior and advanced traveler information systems. In general, network design problems are mainly focused on finding solutions to minimize the travel cost and delay without explicitly considering traveler behavior related to travel mode and route choices. Using the mode choice models, travel demands by travel mode will be projected and used as inputs to the network design problem. The study will also explore the ability to leverage Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) technologies to enhance the amenability of Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) services.

  • Internal Curing as a New Tool for Infrastructure Renewal: Reducing Repair Congestion, Increasing Service Life, and Improving Sustainability

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $102,736
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Jason Weiss, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This research proposes a holistic perspective to quantify the potential benefits of internally cured concrete mixtures compared to conventional concrete mixtures in a transportation system. This research will seek to determine the opportunity costs and the short-term, long-term, and life cycle savings arising from the traffic side. These include: (i) quantifying the durability under various congestion/demand levels, (ii) analyzing the costs-benefits ratios under various traffic conditions to determine the optimal situations which would warrant their usage for bridge decks, (iii) the opportunity costs associated with avoiding renewal/repair expenses and traffic disruption impacts due to the reduction in the frequency of repair and renewal, (iv) the traffic situations in which they are warranted as replacements compared to conventional concretes, and (v) whether they can be used as effective and sustainable repair mechanisms in high traffic areas to reduce the negative impacts of traffic disruptions. In addition, this work will seek to ascertain the environmental impact of using these materials.

  • Using Regional Freight Traffic Assignment Modeling to Quantify the Variability of Pavement Damage for Highway Cost Allocation and Revenue Analysis

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $88,060
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Sam Labi, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This study seeks to utilize a state-of-the-art traffic assignment technique to establish more reliable volumes of future truck traffic flows at each segment, for the purpose of estimating more reliable costs of pavement damage in a disaggregate fashion. An appropriate software package will be identified for use, and segment-specific data will be collected (on the Indiana highway network) to serve as input data. At each pavement segment, the expected pavement damage costs will be determined from the expected level of truck volume (and thus the estimated loading) at that section. Using life cycle analysis, the estimated damage costs will be allocated over the remaining life of the pavement. Further, the study will quantify the deviation, for each pavement segment, of the pavement damage.

  • Air Freight Hubs and Fuel Use

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $77,106
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Morton O'Kelly, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    This project proposes a model-based analysis of air freight fuel use, derived from air freighter movement between hub locations and their connected destinations. The study focuses on three types of hubs: Memphis (MEM) a large air express operation including long range international routes; Indianapolis (IND) primarily domestic air express; and Rickenbacker (LCK) an emerging intermodal facility. This research will link prior work on hub location and network optimization to the more realistic fuel burn parameters that emerge from operational consideration of freight aircraft.

  • Documenting Truck Activity Times at International Border Crossings

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $151,842
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Mark McCord, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigators: Prem Goel, The Ohio State University; Colin Brooks, Michigan Tech Research Institute

    Summary of Research

    Efficient international commerce is critical to the U.S. economy. This project will allow researchers to continue to provide unique and valuable empirical information on activity times of freight trucks at both public and private major North American gateways into Canada. Working with Canadian investigators, NEXTRANS researchers will provide data related to congestion and overall efficiency based on an innovative approach to technology already in use.

  • Traffic Behavior at Freeway Bottlenecks

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $113,924
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Ben Coifman, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    Freeway congestion results in lost time and resources for travelers. To date, the structure of traffic resulting from bottlenecks and congestion has only been studied with point detectors, which are limited in their scope. This research will use an instrumented probe vehicle to go beyond what is possible with point detectors and assess the events that occur between the point detector stations. The probe vehicle is equipped with positioning sensors (GPS, INS) to track its location and ranging sensors (LIDAR, Radar) to monitor nearby vehicles in the ambient traffic. The probe vehicle collects data throughout the bottleneck region and can observe important signals that may not propagate all the way to the point detectors.

  • Research, Education, and Outreach from Campus Transit Laboratory

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $433,434
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Informational Video: Campus Transit Lab Video
    Principal Investigators: Rabi G. Mishalani, Mark R. McCord, Prem K. Goel, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    NEXTRANS investigators, various OSU entities, and Clever Devices, Inc., will continue their work upgrading OSU's Campus Area Bus Service (CABS) with a state-of-the-art "smart bus" system. The implementation of technological upgrades including: sensing, communications, and passenger information systems, has improved the level of service to riders while providing valuable high-resolution data on operating performance and rider characteristics. Through research, education, and outreach, the results of this showcase project will have positive implications for a variety of stakeholders within the NEXTRANS region and beyond.

  • Investigating the Potential of Employer-based Real-Time Ridesharing

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $143,006
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Rabi G. Mishalani, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Gulsah Akar & Mark McCord, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    Over the past several years, The Ohio State University (OSU) Transportation and Parking (T&P) services, the office that plans and operates all transportation related services associated with the campus, has been interested in reducing single occupancy vehicle travel to, on, and from campus. The objective of this study is to: (a) investigate the viability and potential for real-time ridesharing to and from the OSU campus under a variety of incentive and travel behavior scenarios, and (b) planning for an OSU-based real-time ridesharing demonstration for field testing to be implemented in follow-up projects.

  • Impact of Public Transportation Market Share on Sustainable Transportation

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $90,212
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigators: Rabi Mishalani & Prem Goel, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    The objectives of further investigating the impact of transit market share on GHG emissions as part of this continuing project are threefold: (i) expand the dataset to address the transit utilization limitation and acquire a wider range of travel characteristics, (ii) further enrich the modeling features as a result of an expanded dataset, and (iii) broaden the scenario analyses based on the enriched models to demonstrate their value as policy-making support tools.

  • Increasing Accuracy of Vehicle Detection from Conventional Vehicle Detectors – Counts, Speeds, Classification, and Travel Time

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $126,842
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Ben Coifman, The Ohio University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Heng Wei, University of Cincinnati

    Summary of Research

    The ultimate objective of this study is to develop techniques that will improve the measurement accuracy of a given detector station both at the time of installation and throughout its working lifetime. Until recently it has been difficult to validate the detector measurements, but the research team has developed a suite of tools that will greatly facilitate such validation. These improved measurements will in turn improve real time traffic control (e.g., ramp metering and traveler information), vehicle classification, and aggregate performance measures from the vehicle detector infrastructure.

  • Design of Abrasion Resistant Concrete Railway Crosstie Rail Seats

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $107,342
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: J. Riley Edwards & David Lange, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Concrete railroad crossties are well-established within the North American railway industry as an economic and effective means of providing vertical and lateral track restraint and transferring axle loads to the ballast and subgrade. There are, however, notable deficiencies in their service life and overall performance under the repeated heavy-axle load environment seen on high-density freight rail corridors in North America. The objective of this work is to increase understanding of the mechanism of abrasion, determine the role of different combinations of rail seat and tie pad materials on the occurrence of abrasion, and develop rail seat surfaces that are resistant to abrasion. This project will involve the refinement of an abrasion model that will act as a design tool for future concrete tie mix designs and tie pad materials.

  • Development of Improved Pavement Rehabilitation Procedures Based on FWD Backcalculation

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $120,932
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Erol Tutumluer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) overlays are among the most effective maintenance and rehabilitation alternatives in improving the structural as well as functional performance of flexible pavements. This study aims to: (i) demonstrate advantages/disadvantages of HMA overlay design procedures currently in use in Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, (ii) document and compare the estimated construction and life cycle costs of the different design alternatives, and finally, (iii) develop an advanced procedure for HMA overlay design that can incorporate critical pavement responses achieved by performing FWD testing on pavement sections.

  • Integrated Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Risk Management Framework

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $136,574
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Chris Barkan & Rapik Saat, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    There are various feasible approaches to hazardous materials risk reduction including railroad accident prevention through infrastructure improvements, tank car safety design enhancements, railroad operational changes and alteration of the route structure. The challenge is how to select among these to maximize risk reduction in the most efficient manner. The objective of this research is to continue developing a risk management framework and provide quantitative analytical methods to assess the relative effectiveness of various strategies to reduce hazardous materials transportation risk. This work would be the first integrated, risk minimization optimization approach that incorporates the effects of all the major factors affecting this risk.

  • Joint Parameter and State Estimation Algorithms for Real-time Traffic Monitoring

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $107,342
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Daniel Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Traffic congestion is a major problem. As the U.S. population continues to grow and move towards urban areas, the impact of traffic congestion on human mobility, the economy, and the environment is ever increasing. In many cases, solutions to traffic congestion will ultimately depend on improved management of existing infrastructure through the use of innovative, integrated solutions in technology and policy. This research will investigate the problem of simultaneously estimating the traffic state and the traffic model parameters online and in real-time, through the development of a new joint traffic state and parameter estimation algorithm relying on ensemble Kalman filtering.

  • Integration of Smart Phone-Based Pavement Roughness Data Collection Tool with Asset Management System

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $104,572
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: William Buttlar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    This project will combine traditional survey and data collection vehicle based pavement condition survey techniques with a cutting-edge, Android-type smart phone-based pavement roughness mapping application to accomplish short- and long-term objectives related to the implementation of software tools developed in previous NEXTRANS projects. The short-term objectives include calibration and validation of newly developed links between pavement cracking predictions to the prediction of pavement roughness and other forms of deterioration (crack spalling, potholes) as a function of pavement maintenance, traffic and climate. The distress predictions are then used to assess vehicle wear-and-tear and associated user costs.

  • Impact of High-Speed Passenger Trains on Freight Train Efficiency in Shared Railway Corridors

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $120,326
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Yanfeng Ouyang, Rapik Saat, Kuilin Zhang, and Chris Barkan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Development of high-speed passenger rail (HSR) can improve mobility, reduce highway congestion, contribute to sustainable development, and reduce foreign oil dependency. As a result of the interest in HSR, there is a need to understand the complex interactions between high-speed passenger trains and freight trains in shared railway corridors. This project will develop a decision support tool that can help evaluate the impact of higher-speed passenger trains on freight corridor capacity while answering the following fundamental questions: i) how does the introduction of higher-speed passenger trains on freight railroads affect line and network capacity; ii) how is this impact related to various design factors; and iii) what policies will be suitable for public agencies and the private sector to support the development and deployment of the proposed high-speed passenger trains.

  • Dynamic Multi-modal Multi-objective Intersection Signal Priority Optimization

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $120,326
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Rahim Benekohal, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Current practice in traffic signal timing mainly focuses on the mobility needs of motor vehicles, while the needs of users of other transportation modes are often considered secondary factors. Efforts to integrate the auto users’ needs and other modes of transportation have been very limited, even though the interactions among users of transportation modes have significantly increased. This study aims at analyzing the signal timings not only from a multi-mode perspective, but also using real-time decision support tools based on continuous learning.

  • Optimized Active Traffic Management and Speed Harmonization in Work Zones

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $119,460
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Rahim Benekohal, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Active traffic and demand management (ATDM) is a collection of innovative approaches to dynamically manage traffic demand and efficiently utilize available roadway capacity by using real-time operational strategies. Speed harmonization in ATDM is possible by placing dynamic advisory speed signs and activating them based on real-time demand and capacity. The spacing of the dynamic signs and the degree of speed control would determine the degree of harmonization. This study will aim to find the optimal level of speed harmonization by addressing the following issues: i) what level of speed harmonization is needed; ii) how far apart and how many speed signs should be used in a given condition; iii) what speeds would be optimal solutions and how dynamic should they be over time; and iv) what level of demand control would create maximum speed harmony.

  • Agent Based Real-time Signal Coordination in Congested Networks

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $209,602
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Rahim Benekohal, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Satish Ukkusuri, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This study is a continuation of an ongoing NEXTRANS study on agent-based reinforcement learning methods for signal coordination in congested networks. The ongoing study is a joint effort between University of Illinois and Purdue University, where each intersection is controlled by and agent and some information is shared between adjacent agents. Researchers will aim to develop a framework to study signal coordination and real-time adaptive routing within an agent based model. The agent based approach has clear advantages over more traditional approaches as the learning method does not require modeling the system and the operation is free of restrictions imposed by cycle-based strategies.

  • Assessing the Prevalence of Cell Phone Use Under Various Driving Conditions

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 08/01/2012
    Status: Active
    RiP Database:
    Total Dollars: $25,000
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Peter Savolainen, Wayne State University

    Summary of Research

    Research has shown cell phone use to be particularly high among younger drivers, female drivers and drivers who are not appropriately restrained. To date, this data has primarily been collected through direct observation surveys conducted at signalized and stop-controlled intersections. However, it is unclear how use patterns may vary among drivers in the traffic stream under various conditions. In this project the following tasks will be completed to assess the prevalence of cell phone use under various conditions: i) selection of study intersections and segments; ii) training of field data collectors; and iii) data collection and analysis.

2010-2011 Projects

  • Integrated Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Risk Management Framework

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Christopher Barkan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Rail transport plays a key role in the multimodal supply chain needed to safely and economically move hazardous materials from production to consumption points. Using comparative analysis, this research aims to develop an integrated risk management framework model to assess safety and risk at the local, regional, and national network levels. The results of this comprehensive project will be applicable to the continued study of risk management in rail and other modes, making it relevant to a wide variety of stakeholders.

  • Integration of Pavement Cracking Prediction Model with Asset Management and Vehicle-Infrastructure Interaction Models

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $59,361
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: William G. Buttlar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Co-Principal Investigator: Glaucio H. Paulino, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Sustainable pavement infrastructure will lead to decreased maintenance costs and safer, more reliable roadways for travelers. This project will build upon previous research to develop a user-friendly pavement cracking prediction tool to assist in infrastructure renewal planning across multiple modes. Researchers will integrate cracking prediction software with actual infrastructure conditions to generate more realistic and timely data.

  • Using Probe Vehicle Data to Understand Bottlenecks and Congestion

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $54,385
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Benjamin Coifman, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    Freeway congestion results in lost time and resources for travelers. To date, the structure of traffic resulting from bottlenecks and congestion has only been studied with point detectors, which are limited in their scope. This project proposes the use of an instrumented probe vehicle, equipped with both positioning sensors and ranging sensors, to collect data along I-71 in Columbus, Ohio. Research findings will lead to more accurate traffic flow models, impacting safety and fuel efficiency in heavily traveled areas.

  • Increasing Accuracy of Vehicle Speed Measurement in Congested Traffic Over Dual-Loop Sensors

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $61,003
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Benjamin Coifman, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Heng Wei, The University of Cincinnati

    Summary of Research

    Data from loop detectors is used throughout all levels of transportation planning and traffic operation. It is almost always assumed that the data provided by detectors is accurate and reliable. This project aims to develop a suite of cost-effective tools to validate detector measurements by integrating technology with new methods of data collection. Improved loop detector measurements will enrich real time traffic control, vehicle classification, and aggregate performance measures; this feedback will assist operating agencies and policy makers to allocate resources more efficiently.

  • Incorporating High Speed Passenger Rail into a Multimodal Network Model for Improved Regional Transportation Planning

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $63,759
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Dan DeLaurentis, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This project will study the interplay of four modes of transportation: auto, commercial air, on-demand air service (ODAS), and rail, with the purpose of reducing travel times for regional intercity trips. Investigators will update their current multimodal transportation analysis model to include high speed passenger rail, while considering transportation policy and economic variables. Shorter doorstep-to-destination travel times could have significant effects on regional economies, demographics, land use, and quality of life, and lead to shifts in business activity.

  • Improved Concrete Railway Crosstie Design and Performance

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars:$50,000
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: J. Riley Edwards, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Co-Principal Investigator: David A. Lange, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Summary of Research

    Rail transportation is consistently viewed as one of the most viable solutions to the transportation system capacity overload that exists in North America, due to its efficiencies in both fuel usage and comparative overall land use. The primary objective of this research project is to identify methods of improving concrete railroad crosstie design and performance through modeling and experimental testing. The conclusions reached from this research will allow investigators to provide design recommendations to the railway industry, increasing safety and longevity of railway infrastructure.

  • The Regional Economic Impacts of Bypasses: A Longitudinal Study Incorporating Spatial Panel Econometrics and Multilevel Modeling

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $54,553
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Jon D. Fricker, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This project seeks to understand the economic impacts of bypasses on communities at the ZIP code-level. The simultaneous analysis of 60 different bypasses across Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, will allow researchers to make broader conclusions, while keeping in mind the individual characteristics of communities across the Midwest. Research findings are expected to have real-world applications in terms of enhancing mobility and safety by diverting trucks and other traffic; maintaining or restoring the economic vitality of affected communities' central business districts; and minimizing transportation costs.

  • Measuring and Documenting Truck Activity Times at International Border Crossings

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars:$75,556.91
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Mark McCord, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigators: Prem K. Goel, The Ohio State University
    Colin Brooks, Michigan Tech Research Institute

    Summary of Research

    Efficient international commerce is critical to the U.S. economy. This project will allow researchers to continue to provide unique and valuable empirical information on activity times of freight trucks at both public and private major North American gateways into Canada. Working with Canadian investigators, NEXTRANS researchers will provide data related to congestion and overall efficiency based on an innovative approach to technology already in use.

  • Smart Campus Transit Laboratory for Research and Education

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars:$202,735.85
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Informational Video: Campus Transit Lab Video
    Principal Investigator: Rabi G. Mishalani, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigators: Mark R. McCord, The Ohio State University
    Prem K. Goel, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    NEXTRANS investigators, various OSU entities, and Clever Devices, Inc., will continue their work upgrading OSU's Campus Area Bus Service (CABS) with a state-of-the-art "smart bus" system. The implementation of technological upgrades including: sensing, communications, and passenger information systems, has improved the level of service to riders while providing valuable high-resolution data on operating performance and rider characteristics. Through research, education, and outreach, the results of this showcase project will have positive implications for a variety of stakeholders within the NEXTRANS region and beyond.

  • Impact of Public Transit Market Share on Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions: Developing Statistical Models for Aggregate Predictions and Validation of Mechanistic Transportation Models

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars:$56,494.96
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Rabi G. Mishalani, The Ohio State University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Prem K. Goel, The Ohio State University

    Summary of Research

    This continuing study aims to clarify the proposed benefits of encouraging increased use of public transportation in an effort to reduce fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers will further their work in developing statistical relationships that can validate the accuracy of existing mechanistic models used to evaluate the effectiveness of transportation policies on energy consumption and the environment. Results from this research will allow policy makers to more reliably use models designed to quantify the environmental benefits of public transportation.

  • Field Deployment to Quantify the Value of Real-time Information by Integrating Driver Routing Decisions and Route Assignment Strategies

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 1/1/2011
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $127,518
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University

    Summary of Research

    This showcase project aims to adequately understand the value of real-time information in real-world contexts for multiple stakeholders. An Indianapolis-based field experiment will allow researchers to study the actions of participants as they respond to real-time traffic information during their morning commute. A secure Web site will be developed for the initial survey of participants, as well as daily recording of trip diaries. Implications of real-time traffic information will be considered in terms of mobility, safety, and efficiency.

  • Determination of Network Origin-Destination Matrices Using Partial Link Traffic Counts and Virtual Sensor Information in an Integrated Corridor Management Framework

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $68,313
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigator: Shou-Ren Hu, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

    Summary of Research

    Origin-destination (O-D) patterns are crucial in traffic operations and transportation planning. This research will estimate a network O-D demand pattern using information from partial link counts, obtained by strategically installing detectors/sensors. The strategic placement of sensors allows researchers to make O-D demand estimates about the entire network under a limited budget. This research will help transportation/highway management agencies to develop transportation planning and infrastructure strategies by leveraging limited fiscal resources.

  • Highway Reservation System Design and its Application to Freight Transportation

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: $68,313
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Srinivas Peeta, Purdue University
    Co-Principal Investigators: Chih-Peng Chu, National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan
    Mei-Ting Tsai, National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan

    Summary of Research

    Efficient and reliable freight transportation is a key contributor to economic development in both the United States and Taiwan. A lack of adequate government funding has motivated both nations to look to the private sector for innovative solutions to the various problems in the existing transportation systems. Researchers have proposed a highway reservation system for freight carriers using a truck-only lane that guarantees a threshold speed by charging a fee. The mutually beneficial system can potentially help to mitigate congestion; improve freight transportation efficiency and safety; and create a new financing source for highway infrastructure.

  • Investigation of Freeway Operations in Metro Detroit

    Research Information

    RiP Database
    Start Date: 10/1/2010
    Status: Active
    Total Dollars: Pending
    Source Organization: Purdue University, West Lafayette
    Principal Investigator: Peter T. Savolainen, Wayne State University

    Summary of Research

    This study will continue to interpret data collected along four freeways in metro Detroit by the Michigan Intelligent Transportation Systems (MITS) Center. Researchers will further their examination of freeway operations to determine how site-specific variables impact accidents and response times. The results will also allow researchers to verify the reliability and accuracy of data collected by traffic detectors for use in future projects.


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