Past News

Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 years

May 29, 2018

Steelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years.

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p-bit based Classification Architecture Recognized at ACM GLSVLSI Conference

May 29, 2018

May 24, 2018: The research article titled “Low-Energy Deep Belief Networks using Intrinsic Sigmoidal Spintronic-based Probabilistic Neurons” was recognized as the runner-up for Best Paper of Conference at the 28th ACM Great Lakes Symposium on VLSI (GLSVLSI). In this work, CAPSL team members from UCF, Purdue, and UMN developed a Probabilistic Spin Logic (PSL) based “p-bit” device approach for evaluating sigmoidal activation functions using a crossbar architecture. The results were presented during GLSVLSI Technical Session #1 on “Emerging Computing and Post-CMOS Technologies.”

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Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronics - Purdue University

May 28, 2018

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue researchers have discovered a new two-dimensional material, derived from the rare element tellurium, to make transistors that carry a current better throughout a computer chip.

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Purdue’s Entrepreneur Learning Academy seeks faculty interested in commercialization and entrepreneurship

May 25, 2018

Purdue’s Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship will open its 12th year of the Faculty Entrepreneur Learning Academy, a yearlong professional development course exploring research commercialization and the Purdue entrepreneurial ecosystem. The program assists faculty interested in commercialization to understand the critical skills and tools necessary for entrepreneurial success. Through the course, faculty learn critical entrepreneurial skills and participate in extensive networking opportunities.

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Whey protein supplements and exercise help women improve body composition, not leading to bulkiness

May 25, 2018

It’s known that men benefit from whey protein supplements and exercise, and for what is believed to be the first time, the same can be said for women, according to a large study review by Purdue University nutrition experts.

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Simulations show how beta-amyloid may kill neural cells

May 24, 2018

Ganesan Narsimhan (right) and Xiao Zhu simulated the effect beta-amyloid peptides have on neural cells, showing what may be the role these substances have in causing brain cell death and some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease

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Cultural evolution of normative motivations for sustainable behaviour

May 23, 2018

An emerging literature on the evolution of culture can offer new explanations for how norms encourage or obstruct sustainable practices. In particular, dual-inheritance theory describes how interactions between genetic and cultural evolution give rise, in part, to prosociality. Based on this theory, we identify the concept of normative motivation — internalized desires to follow and enforce norms. We discuss the utility of this concept in progressing two major research agendas across the social and behavioural sciences: the impact of motivation on cognition and normative behaviour, and the influence of norms on the policy process.

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New minimally invasive, cost-effective method shows promise in treating cancer without harming healthy cells

May 22, 2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a minimally invasive technique that may help doctors better explore and treat cancerous cells, tissues and tumors without affecting nearby healthy cells. The method, called PLASMAT - Plasma Technologies for a Healthier Tomorrow - combines three emerging techniques that appear promising in the fight against most types of cancer.

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PURDUE RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW HANDHELD DEVICE TO DETECT E. COLI

May 22, 2018

A new way to detect a strain of E. coli could prevent some foodborne illness from hitting store shelves. Purdue Researchers Euiwon Bae and Bruce Applegate have now created a prototype to help prevent farmers from unknowingly spreading E. coli.

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CRISPR-edited rice plants produce major boost in grain yield

May 21, 2018

Zhu stresses Jian-Kang Zhu’s research team used CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology to silence a suite of genes in rice, leading to a variety that yields as much as 31 percent more grain.

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