Courses

Biological Sciences

BIOL 53800: Molecular, Cellular, And Developmental Neurobiology
Credit Hours: 3.00. Molecular mechanisms of neural cell biology and development are considered. Topics and readings are drawn from the current primary literature. BIOL 42000 recommended as a pre-requisite. Typically offered Spring.

BIOL 56200: Neural Systems
Credit Hours: 3.00. (SLHS 50700, PSY 51200) Overview of the structure and function of neural systems including those involved with motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory, learning, memory, and higher cortical processes. Molecular and cellular aspects of neural function are integrated with discussion of relevant neuroanatomy. Background in cell biology, psychobiology, physiology or anatomy is recommended. Typically offered Spring.

BIOL 59500: Special Assignments
Arrange Hours and Credit. Special work, such as directed reading, independent study or research, supervised library, laboratory, or field work, or presentation of material not available in the formal courses of the department. The field in which work is offered will be indicated in the student's record. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

BIOL 51600: Molecular Biology Of Cancer
Credit Hours: 3.00. A detailed course examining the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth of animal cells. Emphasis will be placed on current experimental approaches to defining the molecular basis of growth regulation in developing systems and the uncontrolled proliferation of cells in metabolic disorders, such as cancer. Typically offered Spring.

Psychological Sciences

PSY 51200: Neural Systems
Credit Hours: 3.00. (SLHS 50700, BIOL 56200) Background in cell biology, psychobiology, physiology, or anatomy is recommended. Overview of the structure and function of neural systems including those involved with motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory, learning, memory, and higher cortical processes. Molecular and cellular aspects of neural function are integrated with discussion of relevant neuroanatomy. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Spring.

PSY 69200: Special Topics In Psychology
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. Various topics which may change from semester to semester are presented by faculty in the Department of Psychological Sciences. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

PSY 60300: Psychopharmacology
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course will cover core pharmacology concepts and principles, such as neurotransmitters, receptors, drug classes, and mechanisms of drug action, while highlighting recent findings related to pharmacogenetics and sex/gender differences in psychopharmacology. There will also be a primary focus on drug therapy for major psychiatric disorders including addiction, depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. Prerequisites: (BIOL 56200 and PSY 51200) or PSY 61500 or MCMP 57000. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Biomedical Engineering

BME 52800: Measurement And Stimulation Of The Nervous System
Credit Hours: 3.00. (ECE 52800) Engineering principles addressing questions of clinical significance in the nervous system: neuroanatomy, fundamental properties of excitable tissues, hearing, vision, motor function, electrical and magnetic stimulation, functional neuroimaging, disorders of the nervous system, development and refinement of sensory prostheses. Typically offered Spring.

BME 59500: Selected Topics In Biomedical Engineering
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. This course is designed primarily for specialized topic areas for which there is no specific course, workshop, or individual study plan, but having enough student interest to justify the formalized teaching of a course. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

BME 69500: Advanced Topics In Biomedical Engineering
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. This course is designed primarily for specialized topic areas for which there is no specific course, workshop, or individual study plan, but having enough student interest to justify the formalized teaching of an advanced course. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Graduate Studies

GRAD 61200: Responsible Conduct Of Research
Credit Hours: 1.00. Overview of values, professional standards, and regulations that define responsible conduct in research. Students learn the values and standards of responsible research through readings and lecture/discussion and practice application of these values and standards to research situations through class discussion of case studies from life sciences research. Students must be registered for M.S. or Ph.D. thesis research in their home department. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

MCMP 62500: Grant Writing
Credit Hours: 1.00. Strategies for preparation of grant proposals; generating ideas for proposals and peer review. Lecture and laboratory periods will alternate each week (i.e., lecture week one, laboratory week two). Permission of department required. Typically offered Fall.

Horticulture

HORT 60300: Grants And Grantsmanship
Credit Hours: 1.00. Focuses on funding opportunities in agricultural research and techniques of writing successful scientific grant proposals. Students will write a proposal on a research topic of their choice during the course, and they will gain experience in the peer review process by preparing written reviews of proposals and participating in a panel meeting in which proposals are discussed and ranked. Typically offered Spring.

Speech, Language and Hearing Science

SLHS 50100: Neural Bases Of Speech And Hearing
Credit Hours: 3.00. Study of normal human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology related to speech, language, and hearing functions. Includes material concerning normal and abnormal neurological development over the lifespan. Typically offered Fall.

Statistics

STAT 59800: Topics In Statistical Methods
Credit Hours: 0.00 to 6.00 (West Lafayette, IUPUI) 1.00 to 3.00 (North Central) Directed study and reports for students who wish to undertake individual reading and study on approved topics. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

STAT 50300: Statistical Methods For Biology
Credit Hours: 3.00. Introductory statistical methods, with emphasis on applications in biology. Topics include descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distributions, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, introduction to nonparametric testing, linear regression and correlation, goodness-of-fit tests, and contingency tables. Open only to majors related to the life sciences. For statistics majors and minors, credit should be allowed in no more than one of STAT 30100, STAT 35000, STAT 50100, and in no more than one of STAT 50300 and STAT 51100. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Chemistry

CHM 69600: Special Topics In Chemistry
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. Lectures on selected topics of current interest. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE 64200: Information Theory And Source Coding
Credit Hours: 3.00. A treatment of the basic concepts of information theory. Determination of channel capacity and its relation to actual communication systems. Rate distortion theory is introduced, and the performance of various source codes is presented. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: ECE 60000. Typically offered Fall.

ECE 64500: Estimation Theory
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course presents the basics of estimation and detection theory that are commonly applied in communications and signal processing systems. Applications in communications and signal processing will be considered throughout. Prerequisite: ECE 60000. Typically offered Spring.

ECE 69500: Advanced Topics In Electrical And Computer Engineering
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. Formal classroom or individualized instruction on advanced topics of current interest. Permission of instructor required. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Biochemistry

BCHM 62000: Protein Mass Spectrometry And Proteomics
Credit Hours: 2.00. The goals of this course are to introduce students to 1) basic principles of mass spectrometry, 2) the most common instruments used for protein mass spectrometry including the advantages and disadvantages of each, 3) the most common applications of protein mass spectrometry in biological research, 4) current approaches to quantitative protein mass spectrometry and their use in proteomic studies 5) the skills necessary to analyze mass spec data from a variety of experiment types including the ability to use and understand common database search programs, and 6) contemporary issues associated with large-scale proteomics experiments (including technical challenges and limitations) culminating in the ability to design appropriate experiments to answer a specific proteomic question. Prerequisite: Students need to have taken an undergraduate level biochemistry course and be familiar with basic aspects of protein structure that are taught in such courses. In the absence of an undergraduate biochemistry course, students should discuss their qualifications with the instructor before registering. Typically offered Spring.