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Study Abroad

Study Abroad

The difference between the types of programs available, fee structures associated with each program, and types of aid eligibility that can be used are included below. Other common Study Abroad questions and answers follow, including information for summer study abroad.

  1. EXCHANGE PROGRAMS Exchange programs are what they sound like: a Purdue student goes to a partner university and in exchange, a student from that university is able to study at Purdue. Purdue students pay their regular tuition (in-state students pay in-state tuition and non-residents pay out-of-state tuition). The only additional cost paid to Purdue is the charge for the required emergency medical coverage. This means that:
      1. The most cost-effective study abroad option for an in-state student is probably an exchange program;
      2. The financial aid that you receive while studying in West Lafayette will probably apply to your tuition and fees for the terms you study overseas;
      3. Most scholarships or fee remissions will cover the education costs of exchange programs; State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana scholarships (Higher Education, Core 40, Honors, 21st-century), staff-dependent remissions, or CDV benefits can be used to cover tuition for exchange programs.
      4. The Study Abroad Office staff is not responsible for providing detailed information about your financial aid. Students must meet with representatives in the Division of Financial Aid to get accurate information about their aid for the term they will be oversea.
  2. CO-SPONSORED PROGRAMS – Co-sponsored programs are designed and administered by outside organizations, usually non-profit agencies. Examples include Arcadia, CIEE, IES, IFSA, and DIS. Students participating in co-sponsored programs pay program fees directly to the organization plus a study abroad fee (not tuition) to Purdue. Program fees do not depend on Indiana residency status. They are usually higher than in-state fees + room and board, but lower than out-of-state tuition + room and board. This means that:
      1. For out-of-state students, co-sponsored programs are usually about the same cost as staying on campus, or sometimes even less
      2. For Indiana residents, co-sponsored programs are usually more expensive than fees at Purdue.
      3. IMPORTANT: Indiana residents who are recipients of State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana scholarships (Higher Education, Core 40, Honors, 21st-century), staff-dependent remissions, or CDV benefits cannot use this aid to cover the program fees of co-sponsored programs.
      4. Recipients of Purdue merit scholarships can use their aid for these programs.
  3. DEPARTMENTAL—For Departmental Programs, contact the Division of Financial Aid to determine the types of aid that can be used to cover fees under this program.

  4. DIRECT ENROLL—For Direct Enroll Programs, contact the Division of Financial Aid to determine the types of aid that can be used to cover fees under this program.

  5. PURDUE-ADMINISTERED—Purdue Administered programs are administered by the Study Abroad Office staff.

  6. Participants in Purdue Administered programs are charged comprehensive program fees, not merely tuition. Therefore, Indiana residents who are recipients of State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana scholarships (Higher Education, Core 40, Honors, 21st-century), staff-dependent remissions, or CDV benefits cannot use this aid to cover the program fees of Purdue Administered programs. Recipients of Purdue merit scholarships can use their aid for these programs.
  7. SUMMER—Additional information about summer programs is included toward the bottom of this page. For quick reference, if you plan to study abroad during the summer, remember:
      1. Most summer programs are either co-sponsored or Purdue Administered. That means that State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana scholarships (Higher Education, Core 40, Honors, 21st-century), staff-dependent remissions, or CDV benefits cannot be used to cover the costs of these programs.
      2. If you want to take summer classes at Purdue in addition to going on study abroad, take a close look at the amount of your summer aid award. It may not be enough to comfortably cover both a study abroad experience and classes/rent/food.
      3. Your aid eligibility may increase if you take more credits over the summer; for example, if you register for distance learning courses in addition to your study abroad courses.

Study Abroad

Common Study Abroad Questions

  • Q: Is financial aid available for Purdue students interested in study abroad?
    • A: Yes! The financial aid awarded to students to study on campus at Purdue can be used to study abroad with just a few exceptions (see information above outlining the types of programs and aid you may receive). If you receive a private scholarship, check with your donor to see if you can use it to study abroad.
  • Q: How much does it cost to study abroad?
  • Q: What type of aid is available for extra costs associated with study abroad?
    • A: In general, student and parent loan eligibility may be able to be increased for extra study abroad costs. Study abroad students can typically access Stafford Loans, Parent PLUS Loans, or private loan options for additional costs incurred to study abroad.
  • Q: If I have not applied for financial aid for study abroad, should I?
    • A: Yes! Students not receiving financial aid currently may be able to get student and parent loans for study abroad; the first step is complete the FAFSA.
  • Q: Who should I talk to if I have questions about financial aid for study abroad?
    • A: Counselors in the Division of Financial Aid are all trained to answer general questions about financial aid for study abroad.
  • Q: Who should I talk to about study abroad program costs?
    • A: Study Abroad Office staff are experts about potential study abroad costs. Study abroad advisors will be given preliminary budgets for each program. These budgets list the education costs of the program and the additional costs that you pay out of pocket. These additional costs vary from program to program and from person to person.
  • Q: How do I apply for study abroad financial aid during the academic year?
    • A: Complete the Free Application for Federal Student aid (FAFSA) by March 1 each year for full aid consideration. Note that the FAFSA can be completed after March 1 but you will be limited to the types of financial aid for which you will be considered.
  • Q: How do I apply for study abroad financial aid during the summer?
    • A: Summer financial aid is processed separately from the academic year. Students may be eligible for aid for a Summer Study Abroad program even if they were not eligible during the academic year. Students must have a FAFSA on file AND complete a Summer Aid Application on the DFA website.
  • Q: How many credit hours do I need to be eligible for study abroad financial aid?
    • A: Academic year and summer financial aid eligibility requires you to be enrolled for at least 6 hours as an undergraduate student and 4 hours as a graduate student.
  • Q: What do I do if my financial aid awards do not reflect costs of my program?
    • A: You can contact the Division of Financial Aid (DFA) to check your status, but this may be a timing problem. Once the cost of the Study Abroad program and the list of participants are provided to DFA by the Study Abroad Office, DFA should adjust aid packages by fee assessment time.
  • Q: When are financial aid funds made available to study abroad students?
    • A: Financial aid funds that are in excess of the fees/tuition will be refunded to students no earlier than one week before the program starts. Therefore financial aid funds may NOT be available to pay some pre-departure costs, such as the program deposit, plane ticket, visa and/or passport application fees, etc.
  • Q: Are payment plans available?
    • A: Installment and deferred payment plans are not available at Purdue for the period students study abroad, though some co-sponsored programs may offer installment plans for their fees.

Summer Study Abroad Questions

Study Abroad
  • Q: How do I get aid for my program?
    • A: Apply for financial aid by completing the 2012-13 FAFSA online at www.fafsa.gov now if you haven't already. See the question below for information regarding a separate summer aid application.
  • Q: How many credit hours must I take to receive aid?
    • A: If you want financial aid from DFA for the summer, including Maymester, you must be enrolled in at least 6 credit hours as an undergraduate student. You must complete the Summer Aid Application located on the Financial tab of myPurdue and available in late March to be considered for financial aid for summer. You must know the SAXXXXX number to complete the application, NOT the CRN number. You do not need to complete the summer aid application if you will not enroll in more than 3 credit hours for summer. You may still receive any scholarships awarded by the Study Abroad Office without the summer aid application.
  • Q: How do I register for 6 credit hours if that's required for financial aid eligibility?
    • A: If your study abroad program is for 3 credit hours, you may add another class with 3 credit hours to reach the minimum of 6. The 6 credit hour minimum for financial aid eligibility can be a combination of 3 credits for SA and 3 credits for a distance learning class or a class in one of the other summer modules, as long as the total is 6 credit hours or more.
    • To do this, the additional 3 credit class is billed per credit hour. In-state students would pay an additional $1,044 ($348/credit hour) on top of the cost of the study abroad program to take the course, and out of state students would pay an additional $2,844 ($948/credit hour).
    • If you take 6-9 credits in addition to the study abroad program, you are billed a flat rate price for the additional classes. In-state students would pay $2,475, and out of state students would pay $7,176, for an additional 6-9 credit hours on top of the study abroad program.
  • Q: How do I know how much financial aid I will receive if I study abroad?
    • A: In general, no two students will receive the same amounts or types of aid to study abroad. Every program has different costs and determines the amount of aid awarded.
    • If you only receive loan eligibility for the academic year, then you will only receive loans for summer. If you use all of your Stafford Loan eligibility, Parent PLUS Loan will be offered as an alternative.
    • If you receive a Pell Grant and are in-state, you will likely receive some type of gift aid for summer. Pell Grant is not available to students who attended full-time during the academic year.
    • State aid is generally not available for use during the summer.
    • It may be possible to receive a study abroad scholarship or travel grant through the Study Abroad office.
  • Q: How do I get money to pay for deposits, plane tickets, or other expenses that I have now?
    • A: Typically, students have to cover any up-front costs out of pocket. However, students that have remaining loan eligibility left during spring semester may borrow the money now and use it towards study abroad expenses. This is a good option if there is enough remaining loan eligibility to cover the cost of the study abroad program. You then wouldn't have to take another course over the summer to get to the 6 credit hour minimum and would not have to complete the summer aid application.
  • Q: Will my financial aid eligibility for next semester be affected if I receive financial aid to study abroad over summer?
    • A: No, the summer is part of the 2012-13 academic year. Financial aid eligibility for next fall and spring is based on the 2013-14 FAFSA and is independent from the current summer.
  • Q: If I get a scholarship from my program, will that affect the amount of financial aid I receive for summer?
    • A: Your total financial aid amount will remain the same. Only your loan offers for summer will be reduced by the amount of the scholarship. "Gift" aid that is awarded by DFA will not be reduced as a result of receiving a study abroad scholarship.
  • Q: Can I use my financial aid to pay for a co-sponsored program?
    • A: The only limitation for co-sponsored programs is that fee remissions, or fee-dedicated aid, cannot be used. This includes state aid, CVO, or staff fee remissions.
  • Q: Can I receive financial aid early if my program's deadline is before I would normally receive financial aid?
    • A: Federal regulations prevent Purdue and other colleges from disbursing financial aid more than 10 days before a class or program start date. As a result, it is generally not possible to receive your financial aid prior to that date. However, many programs offer deferments for the payment deadline. The Study Abroad Office will determine if this option is available for your program or not.
    • If your program qualifies for a payment deferment, the Study Abroad Office should be able to provide a deferment form to you. You will need to bring the signed form into the DFA with the SA program number included on the form. If your parents are borrowing parent loans to help pay for the program costs, DFA must be able to see a credit approved loan application on studentloans.gov to count the amount as part of your aid for deferment purposes. Otherwise, you may have to provide this information to the program yourself or complete other paperwork that they may have.