Recent News

Research seeks to improve electrical system against weather outages

September 18, 2017

Determining how to improve the resilience of power grid structures in the face of outages from severe weather events is the focus of a multidisciplinary study by Purdue professors. The project, “Towards a Resilient Grid: An Investment Prioritization Decision Framework that Integrates the Growing Risks of Severe Weather-Induced Outages,” received a $468,851 grant from the National Science Foundation.

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Breakthrough soybean research by Purdue and Dow AgroSciences could save farmers millions

September 13, 2017

Through a collaborative project, Purdue University and Dow AgroSciences researchers have discovered a novel soybean gene that provides resistance to a devastating and costly fungal disease.

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NSF-funded center at Purdue could help power U.S. for next century

September 12, 2017

The National Science Foundation has chosen Purdue University to lead an engineering research center, which will develop new technologies to produce fuels from U.S. shale-gas deposits that could inject $20 billion annually into the economy.

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Purdue researchers create device to identify risks for breast cancer

September 11, 2017

Researchers at Purdue University are creating a device that they hope will help identify risk factors that cause breast cancer. The device, known as risk-on-a-chip, is a small plastic case with several thin layers and an opening for a piece of paper where researchers can place a portion of tissue. This tiny environment produces risk factors for cancer and mimics what happens in a living organism.

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Key process to be modernized in production of lifesaving drugs, food preservation

September 11, 2017

A consortium of experts is working to modernize a process that is used in making a wide range of products, from freeze-dried space foods to lifesaving wonder drugs. The process, called “lyophilization,” removes water at low temperature and pressure. Lyophilization is needed for products that would be damaged if they were dried by heating, but it can be slow, energy-intensive and expensive.

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Purdue researchers receive grant to improve mobile testing for anemia

September 8, 2017

The National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center has awarded Purdue University’s Young Kim, associate professor with the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and Md Munirul Haque, research scientist with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, and their interdisciplinary research team, a $385,000, two-year grant to improve mobile testing for anemia in resource-limited settings.

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Understanding ground conditions before storms helps scientists predict heavy rains in monsoon regions

September 7, 2017

As heavy flooding events, including those in Houston, Texas, and Mumbai, India, continue, research teams from Purdue University and India have been working on improving the models that can help predict heavy rainfall from weather events. The researchers found that including an improved representation of how hot and wet the land surface is before a storm forms gives significant information that leads to improvements in the prediction of heavy rain timing, location, magnitude and duration.

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First measurements of iodine in the Arctic reveal questions about air pollution

September 6, 2017

New measurements of molecular iodine in the Arctic show that even a tiny amount of the element can deplete ozone in the lower atmosphere.

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High tunnels boost yield, along with plant-damaging insects

August 31, 2017

Growers of tomatoes, cucumbers and other vegetables can extend their growing season and increase yield by placing high tunnels over their cold-sensitive crops, but those tunnels don’t provide the pest protection that has long been assumed.

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Nanoparticle-drug combo turns white fat to brown fat with potential to treat obesity, diabetes

August 29, 2017

In a potential breakthrough for the treatment of obesity and diabetes, Purdue University scientists have found a way to deliver a drug directly to stored white fat cells to turn them into more easily burned brown fat cells.

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