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New C-BRIC center will tackle brain-inspired computing

January 17, 2018

Purdue University will lead a new national center to develop brain-inspired computing for intelligent autonomous systems such as drones and personal robots capable of operating without human intervention. The Center for Brain-inspired Computing Enabling Autonomous Intelligence, or C-BRIC, is a five-year project

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Study: Hormone keys plant growth or stress tolerance, but not both

January 16, 2018

Plants that grow well tend to be sensitive to heat and drought, and plants that can handle those stresses often have stunted growth. A Purdue University plant scientist has found the switch that creates that antagonism, opening opportunities to develop plants that exhibit both characteristics.

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Fast-moving electrons create current in organic solar cells

January 12, 2018

Researchers at Purdue University have identified the mechanism that allows organic solar cells to create a charge, solving a longstanding puzzle in physics.

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Study uncovers distinctions in major crop genome evolutions

January 10, 2018

Damon Lisch, associate professor in the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, and Jianxin Ma, professor in the Department of Agronomy, studied tthe ways in which genomes duplicate - creating multiple copies of genes - and how those genomes change over time.

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Babies stir up clouds of bio-gunk when they crawl

January 10, 2018

When babies crawl, their movement across floors, especially carpeted surfaces, kicks up high levels of dirt, skin cells, bacteria, pollen, and fungal spores, a new study has found. The infants inhale a dose of bio bits in their lungs that is four times (per kilogram of body mass) what an adult would breathe walking across the same floor. As alarming as that sounds, lead researcher Brandon Boor of Purdue University is quick to add that this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

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Inkjet-printed thermite deposits energetic materials safely

January 8, 2018

Researchers have developed a method to deposit tiny amounts of energetic materials (explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics) using the same technology as an inkjet printer.

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Study suggests new targets for improving soybean oil content

January 3, 2018

Scientists working to increase soybean oil content tend to focus their efforts on genes known to impact the plant’s seeds, but a Purdue University study shows that genes affecting other plant parts deserve more attention.

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Fruit fly breakthrough may help human blindness research

December 18, 2017

For decades, scientists have known that blue light will make fruit flies go blind, but it wasn’t clear why. Now, a Purdue University study has found how this light kills cells in the flies’ eyes, and that could prove a useful model for understanding human ocular diseases such as macular degeneration.

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Freezing electrons makes them get in line

November 27, 2017

New research published in Nature Communications suggests that electrons in a two-dimensional gas can undergo a semi-ordered (nematic) to mostly-ordered (smectic) phase transition, which has been discussed in physics theory but never seen in practice before.

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Faculty members receive Showalter funding

November 27, 2017

Three faculty members have been designated Showalter Faculty Scholars for 2017. The researchers were selected in partnership with the university faculty scholars program. The Executive Vice President for Research and Partnerships Office nominated university faculty scholars in consultation with academic units and the Office of the Provost, and an external committee made the final selections. Each of the new Showalter Scholars will receive funding for five years: an annual award of $5,000 from the trust, matched at 100 percent by the Provost.

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