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Freezing electrons makes them get in line

November 27, 2017

New research published in Nature Communications suggests that electrons in a two-dimensional gas can undergo a semi-ordered (nematic) to mostly-ordered (smectic) phase transition, which has been discussed in physics theory but never seen in practice before.

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Faculty members receive Showalter funding

November 27, 2017

Three faculty members have been designated Showalter Faculty Scholars for 2017. The researchers were selected in partnership with the university faculty scholars program. The Executive Vice President for Research and Partnerships Office nominated university faculty scholars in consultation with academic units and the Office of the Provost, and an external committee made the final selections. Each of the new Showalter Scholars will receive funding for five years: an annual award of $5,000 from the trust, matched at 100 percent by the Provost.

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Purdue-affiliated apple gaining popularity for organic production in France

November 21, 2017

French company Benoit Escande Editions SARL has obtained worldwide exclusive rights to Juliet, a Purdue-affiliated apple gaining popularity for organic production. The apple is a product of a cooperative involving Purdue University, Rutgers University and the University of Illinois. The Juliet is popular because of its disease resistance and long storage life.

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Vibrating sensors could identify blood biomarkers, improve early-stage detection, treatment of numerous diseases

November 20, 2017

Purdue University researchers have found a method of identifying biological markers in small amounts of blood that they believe could be used to detect a myriad of diseases, infections and different medical conditions at early stages.

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Carbon’s economic damage costlier than thought based on current science

November 20, 2017

The data used to calculate the damage that an additional ton of carbon dioxide has on the global economy has long relied on outdated science. Recent updates modeled by the University of California, Davis and Purdue University raise the calculations of those costs significantly and change the outlook on climate change from a positive for agriculture to a negative.

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Widespread chemical contaminants stunt growth of amphibians

November 16, 2017

A series of synthetic chemicals widely used in household products, food packaging and clothing have a significant effect on the development of frogs, even at low doses, according to a Purdue University study.

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Game theory harnessed for cybersecurity of large-scale nets

November 15, 2017

Researchers have laid the groundwork for a method to improve cybersecurity for large-scale systems like the power grid and autonomous military defense networks by harnessing game theory and creating new intelligent algorithms.

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Engaging children in math at home equals a boost in more than just math skills

November 9, 2017

reschool children who engage in math activities at home with their parents not only improve their math skills, but also their general vocabulary, according to research from Purdue University.

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Research shows ice sheets as large as Greenland’s melted fast in a warming climate

November 9, 2017

New research published in Science shows that climate warming reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by half in as little as 500 years, indicating the Greenland Ice Sheet could have a similar fate.

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We should use central pressure deficit, not wind speed, to predict hurricane damage

November 8, 2017

New research published in Science shows that climate warming reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by half in as little as 500 years, indicating the Greenland Ice Sheet could have a similar fate.

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