Schedule Type Classifications

The delivery of instruction often requires educational material to be organized and presented to students in a variety of ways. In order to facilitate the planning for and scheduling of classes to accommodate these multiple types of instruction, it is necessary to divide courses into organizational parts which reflect the unique combinations of instructors, meeting places, and time patterns used to conduct the instruction.

A system for classifying these organizational parts has been developed as an aid in planning instructional offerings and for subsequent analysis of instructional data for internal management and reporting to external agencies. The schedule types listed below are intended to reflect the nature of activities required of students, the relationship between students and their instructors, and the settings required to deliver the content of an instructional offering.

Many of the definitions refer to weekly student class hours (WSCH) or credit hours that are associated with the type of instruction. Often, the relationship between the expected learning outcome for a particular organizational part, and the number of class hours or credit hours associated with it, will define the appropriate schedule type to be used. The specific measures in each definition are intended as a guide, and reflect typical situations for the type of instruction described. The relation between class hours and credit hours for a particular organizational part may vary from these guidelines, but should only do so if this results in awarding credit that is more appropriate to the educational experience provided. Procedures for assigning credit hours are defined in a separate document Semester Credit Hours Guidelines that relates the outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of outside preparation or work expected for the class to the number of credits awarded.

Organized Class Instruction

This major category includes all instructional situations where the same group of Students is scheduled to meet together with one or more instructors on a regular basis, whether on or off campus. Classes with a specified number of hours “to be arranged” are included.

Non-Laboratory Class Instruction

These instructional settings are defined when the subject matter is primarily delivered by the instructor or a fellow student’s verbal or visual presentation rather than through the student’s own active practice or experimentation. Instruction is usually conducted in general-purpose classroom facilities, including lecture halls and seminar rooms. Nonlaboratory class instruction includes video presentations where an instructor is also present. Examples: lecture, recitation, quiz, discussion, presentations, case studies, teambased learning and seminar activities. Please refer to Semester Credit Hours Guidelines that relates the outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of outside preparation or work expected for the class to the number of credits awarded.

LEC — Lecture — Refers to the first or primary organization of non-lab class instruction, e.g., a lecture where instructor based material is presented, or a seminar where material is analyzed and discussed by both students and instructor. Also includes case studies and team-based learning situations.

REC — Recitation — Refers to a second organization of non-lab class instruction, typically smaller groups reviewing or discussing material previously presented in a lecture section.

PRS — Presentation — Refers to classes that are designed simply to present material to students, with minimal preparation expected on their part and only nominal use of specialized equipment/facilities. Example: a guest lecture series.

Additional scheduling organizational parts may be necessary as a result of complex time statements or room assignments. These are designated by Lec 1, Lec 2, . . . , or Rec 1, Rec 2, . . . , etc.

Laboratory Class Instruction

Instructional activities in settings providing specialized facilities or equipment for students to master the subject matter either by performing experiments or practicing the skills being learned. The instructor generally supervises, assists, answers questions, etc., rather than making presentations. Examples: science laboratories, computer laboratories, private lessons, auto-tutorial, or self-paced classes, studios, and clinics. Please refer to Semester Credit Hours Guidelines that relates the outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of outside preparation or work expected for the class to the number of credits awarded.

LAB — Laboratory — Refers to the first organization of laboratory class instruction unless one of the other classifications below is more appropriate. Includes both group instruction and individualized instruction such as music and flight training lessons, supervised computing exercises, and hands-on activities. Use Lab 1, Lab 2, . . . , etc., for additional organizational parts, if any.

LBP — Lab Prep — Refers to those situations in which lab classes meet together, usually in a separate location from the laboratory, for a brief period prior to the laboratory class to receive instructions.

CLN — Clinic — Refers to situations where the student is engaged in the practice and use of techniques for treating clients or patients for the purpose of improving the clients or patients’ well being. The instructor’s role varies from direct assistance to simple availability for questions and supervision. Student activities cover a broad spectrum: observation, interviewing, therapy, rounds, diagnosing, etc.

SD — Studio — Refers to situations where the student is engaged in the practice and use of techniques for productions in the areas of theater, dance, music, and other art forms in the presence of an audience. This instruction is used to further advance student's skills in their field of performance. The instructor role varies from direct assistance to simple availability for questions and supervision. Student activities cover a broad spectrum: dance rehearsals, theater productions, vocal performances, recordings, etc.

Independent Study

This major category includes those instructional situations where students work largely on their own initiative, and contact with an instructor is usually quite infrequent and irregular compared with that in the Organized Class Instruction category above. Instruction may be individualized or in small groups as determined by the instructor. Normally, no pre-defined meeting times are associated with these situations, therefore, no weekly student class hours are generated by these schedule types. In addition, these activities are typically performed outside the usual classroom and class laboratory setting. Refer to Semester Credit Hours Guidelines that relates the outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of outside preparation or work expected for the class to the number of credits awarded.

EX — Experiential — Refers to those situations where the student applies previously acquired knowledge and skills in a supervised situation which approximates the conditions under which those knowledge/skills will ultimately be used, usually off campus. Examples: practice teaching, practicums, on-the-job training, work experience programs, cooperative education programs, apprenticeships, externships, preceptorships, etc.

RES — Research — Used for courses in which students are enrolled to conduct thesis research at the undergraduate or graduate level as required for their program. Examples: Senior thesis, Master's thesis, and Doctoral thesis.

IND — Individual Study — Refers to those situations where students work primarily on their own initiative through reading, writing, performing experiments or non-thesis research, etc. Contact with an instructor may be one-on-one or in small groups and is generally only on a few arranged occasions throughout the semester to receive assignment, have progress checked, etc. Examples: directed reading, honors projects, problems and special projects courses, etc.

DIS — Distance Education — Refers to a structured learning process where a student is physically removed from the instructor and instructional setting associated with the campus, but has the opportunity to interact with the instructor or also with other students in instructional activities. This interaction can take on a variety of forms. Examples: instruction delivered via computer or other electronic media, correspondence, or other appropriate mechanism.

Non-Directed Study

This major category includes those instructional situations where the student is expected to conduct various activities on a fairly regular basis independent of any contact with an instructor. However, physical resources, usually specialized, are required to conduct these activities. In some cases, these activities are essentially equivalent to homework for traditional classes. Examples: music practice, scheduled time in open computing labs, group project sessions, use of campus audio/visual resources with no instructor present, language practice sessions in non-supervised facilities, etc. Please refer to Semester Credit Hours Guidelines that relates the outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of outside preparation or work expected for the class to the number of credits awarded.

PSO — Practice/Study/Observation — Refers to those situations in which specialized facilities are made available for a student to practice, observe, or study in addition to the time spent in contact with an instructor in other instructional settings. This option is selected for administrative purposes when there is a need to schedule specialized facilities. This schedule type must be used in conjunction with another schedule type and cannot be offered alone.

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