Purdue Identities Project Nobody should have to be invisible. #BeSeen

Identity Inclusive Content

The content in the gallery below was produced for the Purdue Identities Project in order to supplement existing lecture materials for instructors in a variety of settings. The materials may be taught as-is, using the slides and instruction documents, or broken down for incorporation into the instructor’s own materials.

The content of all modules focuses on helping individuals to understand the nature of social identities, understand their own identities (and the importance of them), and recognize how our biases and unawareness of others’ identities can create individual and group conflict. A consistent aim for all the materials is to help participants understand the burden of identity concealment, or the hiding of parts of oneself, which is often a consequence of perceiving that others will not accept core parts of oneself. By using research, hands-on learning, and media, and group interactions, participants can develop empathy for others that are quite different from themselves.


Search Results

Resources

Thumbnail Image Description Tags Keywords Overlay content
thumbnail The Nacirema Culture: Viewing a Culture from an Outsider’s Perspective Culture,Intercultural_Sensitivity,Self-awareness,Slide_Deck,Worksheet,In_Class_Exercise,Take_Home_Exercise,Psychological_Quiz Culture,Intercultural sensitivity,Self-awareness,Slide deck,Worksheet,In-Class Exercise,Take-home Exercise,Psychological quiz

The Nacirema Culture: Viewing a Culture from an Outsider’s Perspective

Description

This activity asks students to respond to a short video derived from Horace Miner’s article about a “foreign” culture actually based on American traditions (Miner, 1956). By watching the video, responding to the questions, and then contrasting initial reactions to the Nacirema culture (before and after learning the true origin of the Nacirema culture), students can observe their own cultures from an outsider’s perspective. Attempting to understand a culture can lead to enhanced understanding of sensitivities others have and lead to more effective judgments pertaining to the treatment and management of others (Morris, Ames, & Lickel, 1999).

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Understand own cultural groups
  • Respect other cultural norms
  • Gain an outsider’s perspective
In-class
  • 20 mins
  • Reading slides
  • Discuss in groups
  • Answering questions
  • Measurement of intercultural sensitivity
thumbnail Cross-Cultural
Online Discussion Board
Cultural_Groups,Diversity,Tolerance,Discussion_Board,Survey,Assessment,Slide_Deck Cultural Groups,Diversity,Tolerance,Discussion board,Survey,Assessment,Slide deck

Cross-Cultural Online Discussion Board

Description

This activity is an online discussion board in which students can interact with other students of different cultures (or backgrounds) for five weeks, with the expectation that they will post a minimum of four times per week. Interactions with those from other cultures in an online setting can help to create open communication between people of different social groups and possibly invisible identity groups. Such interaction has been shown to increase feelings of tolerance and diversity both within and outside of the students’ respective cultural group. In the original research article, both Chinese and American students were asked to participate in the study. After 5 weeks, each group rated positive feelings of their interactions with each other, had higher feelings of tolerance and diversity, and a greater appreciation of the course (Cathey & Ross, 2011).

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Develop tolerance and appreciation for those outside of your culture group
At home
  • 5 minutes to explain in-class
  • 20-30 minutes a week at home
  • Posting on the message board weekly
  • Review at the end of the activity
  • Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (ISS)
thumbnail
Rainbow Talk
LGBTQ,Ingroups_Outgroups,Ingroup_Outgroup,Attitudes,Intergroup_Relations,Intergroup_Anxiety,Intergroup_Bias,Take_Home_Exercise,In_Class_Exercise,Extra_Credit_Exercise,Pre_Post_Questionnaire,Essay LGBTQ,Outgroup,Attitudes,Intergroup Relations,Intergroup Anxiety,Intergroup Bias,Take-Home Exercise,In-Class Exercise,Extra-Credit Exercise,Pre/Post Questionnaire,Essay

Rainbow Talk

Description

Research indicates that contact with outgroup members can generate positive feelings toward outgroups and reduce intergroup anxiety (Levin, van Laar & Sidanius, 2003). This activity provides an opportunity for students to gain meaningful contact with LGBTQ community through engaging in an interview or lecture event. Inclusive of both a writing assignment and one-on-one talk outside of class with LGBTQ population or participation in a sponsored lecture event, students may have the opportunity to earn extra credit points or engage in a mandatory activity that can help them to explore their views on LGBTQ population and address the prejudice which leads to negative intergroup relations.

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Decrease intergroup bias and anxiety toward LGBTQ members
In-class
  • 10 mins
  • Give a brief introduction to this assignment
  • Worksheet
  • Attitude toward LGBTQ population
Take home
  • Depends on the activity chosen
  • Reading article;
  • Answering questions;
  • Completing questionnaires
  • Worksheet
thumbnail
The Language Class
Language,Communication,Expression,Identities,Cultural_Perspective,Slides,Partner_Discussion,In_Class_Exercise,Short_Answer_Exercise,Pre_Post_Questionnaire International,Language barrier,Native language,Communication,Expression,Identities,Cultural Perspective,Reading Slides,Partner Discussion,Question Answering,Pre/Post Questionnaire,In-Class Exercise,Short Answer Exercise

The Language Class

Description

This activity asks students to translate a list of identities using their native language, discuss the identities within a group, and apply them in daily conversations. Some international students struggle with the language barrier and refrain from expressing themselves (Mori, 2000). Through this activity, international students who are unfamiliar with speaking English language and lack the social knowledge to discuss identities, can have a chance to speak out. After, students will reflect on what they have learned.

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Become more comfortable talking about identities
  • Gain a cultural perspective on identities
  • Learn words to utilize when speaking of identity
In-class
  • 45 mins
  • Two 5 min surveys
  • Reading slides;
  • Discuss in groups;
  • Answering questions.
  • Filling out worksheet
  • Knowledge on identity;
  • Likelihood to express one’s own identities
  • Communication skills
thumbnail Coffee Break: Find a time to talk with someone you have never met before Attitudes,Culture,Values,Identity_Perception,Intergroup_Bias,Anxiety,Ingroups_Outgroups,Reducing_Prejudice,Positive_Intergroup_Relations,Concealed_Identities,Extra_Credit_Exercise,In_Class_Exercise,Take_Home_Exercise,Reflective_Essay,Open_Discussion,Partner_Discussion,One_On_One_Discussion,Pre_Post_Questionnaire Attitudes,Culture,Values,Identity perception,Intergroup bias,Anxiety,In-groups/Outgroups,Reducing Prejudice,Positive Intergroup Relations,Concealed Identities,Extra-Credit Exercise,In-class Exercise,Take Home Exercise,Reflective Essay,Open Discussion,Partner Discussion,One-On-One Discussion,Outside-of-class,Pre/Post Questionnaire

Coffee Break: Find a time to talk with someone you have never met before

Description

Contact with individuals outside of one’s intimate ingroup has consistently been shown to improve attitudes toward outgroup members (Levin, van Laar, & Sidanius, 2003). This collaborative exercise is designed to create an interaction between class members typically not incorporated into students’ ingroups by providing a real-world opportunity to gain exposure to different cultures, values, and perceptions on identities (while also giving them a chance to make friends). Inclusive of both a writing assignment and one-on-one discussion outside of class, this activity, which can be done as extra credit or a mandatory exercise, can help students raise awareness of their own limited perspectives and offer a chance to reduce prejudice, which lead to positive intergroup relations.

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Provide opportunities for students to connect with out-group members
  • Decrease intergroup bias and anxiety
In-class
  • 15 mins
  • Give a brief introduction to this assignment
  • Intergroup Bias & Anxiety
Take home
  • Depends on the activity chosen
  • Meet with partner
  • Answering questions
  • Completing questionnaires
  • Writing essay
  • Essay
  • Questionnaire
thumbnail
Miniature Earth
Societal_Norms,Cultural_Diversity,Beliefs,Gender,SES,Religion,Cultural_Dimensions,Cultural_Diversity,Global_Perspective,World_Development,Physical_Economic_Social_Relationships,Worksheet,Pre_Post_Questionnaire,In_Class_Exercise,Video_Exercise,Group_Discussion,Class_Discussion,Slides Societal norms,Cultural diversity,Beliefs,Gender,Socio-Economic Strength,SES,Religion,Cultural Dimensions,Cultural Diversity,Global Perspective,World Development,Physical/Economic/Social Relationships,Worksheet,Pre/Post Questionnaire,In-Class Exercise,Video Exercise,Group Discussion,Class discussion,Slides

Miniature Earth

Description

This activity, based on the video called The Miniature Earth, challenges common conceptions of what is “normal” in society by manipulating the world’s representation of resources according to gender, socio-economic strength (SES), sexual orientation, religion, and other cultural dimensions. It encourages students to think of cultural diversity from a more global perspective. It also highlights the unbalanced distribution of resources.

Geared to reveal to participants how often we are unaware of the differences and cultural dimensions throughout the world, Miniature Earth can challenge each individual to review their beliefs. Since the early 2000s, educators have been using Miniature Earth to help others understand world development, and its physical, economic, or social relationships components (“The miniature earth,” 2001).

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Develop a sense of surrounding environment
  • Respect other cultural norms
In-class
  • 5 min instructions
  • 10 min fill in worksheet
  • 15 min group discussion
  • Reading slides
  • Discuss in groups
  • Answering questions
  • Cultural Intelligence Scale
thumbnail
Never Have I Ever
Identities,Disclosure,Concealed_Identities,Stigma,Introspective,Discrimination,Burden_Concealed_Identities,In_Class_Exercise,Lecture,Pre_Post_Questionnaire,Group_Discussion,Class_Discussion,Game,Worksheet,Slides,Creating_Empathy Identities,Disclosure,Concealed Identities,Stigma,Introspective,Discrimination,Burden of Concealed Identities,Creating Empathy,In-Class Exercise,Lecture,Pre/Post Questionnaire,Group Discussion,Class Discussion,Game,Worksheet,Slides

Never Have I Ever

Description

This in-class activity and lecture asks students to play a short introspective game, which exposes them to the concepts of hidden identities, disclosure, and the potential for stigma and discrimination. Individuals with concealed identities experience significant stress from the burden of having to conceal significant parts of their lives and who they are (over and above the burden which may come from the identity; Pachankis, 2007). By participating in this activity, students may gain more empathy for the burden of concealing and understand the need to create a safe climate (Jones & King, 2014). They may also be disclosing, in addition to experiencing greater willingness to disclose, their own identities under certain conditions (Phillips, Rothbard, & Dumas, 2009).

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Understand the burden of disclosure and concealment;
  • Understand the meaning and nature of identity;
  • Gain understanding on the needed conditions to precipitate in disclosure.
In-class
  • 20 – 40 minutes, dependent on use of media and discussions
  • Lecture
  • Worksheet
  • Group discussion
  • Willingness to disclose
  • Intergroup anxiety
thumbnail
Small World
Concealed_Identities,Dissimilar_Identities,Sociological_Experiment,Minorities,Creating_Empathy,Stigmatized_Groups,Attitudes,Diversity,Reducing_Prejudices,Slides,In_Class_Exercise,Take_Home_Exercise,Pre_Post_Questionnaire Concealed Identities,Dissimilar Identities,Milgrim’s Sociological Experiment,Minorities,Creating Empathy,Stigmatized Groups,Attitudes,Diversity,Reducing Outgroup Prejudices,Slides,In-Class Exercise,Class discussion,Take-home Exercise,Pre/Post Questionnaire

Small World

Description

This in-class activity, based on Milgram’s small-world experiment, encourages students to see how closely we interact with others with dissimilar identities. Adapted from Milgram’s (1963) original sociological experiment, which showed that any pair of individuals in the world can be connected to each other by a short sequence of acquaintances (ordinarily around six), this experiment allows students to check the level of distance between themselves and others with minority or hidden social identities. Research shows that activities inducing empathy for a member of a stigmatized group can improve attitudes towards the group as a whole (Batson et al., 1997) and is associated with more positive attitudes toward other stigmatized groups (Tarrant & Hadert, 2010, p.1651). Students typically find that the level of distance is lower than initially predicted, which can help open a conversation on diversity and identity, reduce out-group prejudices, and pave the way for greater empathy towards hidden diversity otherwise assumed to be non-present.

Learning Outcomes and Materials
Learning OutcomesTypeTimeActivitiesMaterialsAssessment
  • Examine own cultural groups;
  • Respect other cultural norms;
  • Gain an outsider’s perspective.
In-class
  • 30 min (lecture and activity)
  • Reading slides;
  • Class activity;
  • Class discussion.
  • Basic Empathy;
  • Attitudes towards AIDS victims;
  • Attitudes towards homeless people.
Take home
  • 20 min (handout)
  • Activity.

              

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