Research Foundation News

February 26, 2018

Purdue, NSWC Crane researchers display top innovations available for licensing at annual technology showcase

Paul Wenthold Paul Wenthold, an associate professor of physical organic chemistry and mass spectrometry, explains how his detection of phenol derivatives innovation works during the Purdue Technology Showcase. (Purdue University image/Rebecca Wilcox) Download image

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. –  Purdue University and NSWC Crane researchers presented their top innovations available for licensing, including advancements in pharmaceuticals, agriculture, materials and other fields, during the second annual Purdue Technology Showcase.

More than 60 business executives, investors and entrepreneurs from at least a half dozen states, including as far away as Maryland and Texas, crowded into the Herman and Heddy Kurz Purdue Technology Center on Wednesday, Feb. 21 to learn about the technologies available for licensing through the Purdue Research Foundation’s Office of Technology Commercialization.

“The showcase was a huge success. The energy from the attendees and the innovators who were pitching was outstanding,” said Brooke Beier, OTC’s executive director. “Purdue innovations have the opportunity to make such an impact in the world and we hope events like this showcase continue to shine a light on these technologies and the exciting research at Purdue.”

Each innovator gave a three-minute presentation during the fast-paced showcase. Links to videotaped presentations of the technologies are available below. Innovators and investors had a chance to talk more in-depth in a room where the innovators displayed more information about their technologies.

“We believe valuable connections, collaborations and industry partners were identified at the event and look forward to launching technologies out of the research labs at Purdue and into the hands of those that can commercialize them,” Beier said.

Tilman Kubis Tillmann Kubis, a research assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, talks about his research to reduce drug development costs by more accurately and efficiently modeling molecules and chemical reactions in liquid solutions. (Purdue University image/Rebecca Wilcox) Download image

Bahar Dhowan, a graduate student who works with professor Hyowon Lee in Purdue's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, presented an automated opioid overdose reversal implant that is placed under the skin and delivers an antidote when respiratory failure is detected.

“Once that release mechanism is triggered, it allows for the drug to diffuse out and reverse that opioid overdose effect,” Dhowan said.

Dhowan said there is a great need for the device because of the opioid epidemic facing the nation.

Jeff Miller, a professor in the Davidson School of Chemical Engineering, described during his presentation how Purdue researchers are developing technologies converting light hydrocarbons from shale resources into transportation fuels.

“These shale formations are widely distributed around the country. There’s enough energy in these formations to last the United States at least 100 years,” Miller said. “The problem is many of these can’t be transformed into transportation fuels.”

Purdue researchers have developed a way to turn these abundant hydrocarbons and turn them into either gasoline, diesel fuel or jet fuel. The researchers believe they can develop a 15,000 barrels a day process for $200 million. 

A video of the presenting innovators is linked below following their names:

Bahar Dhowan Bahar Dhowan, a graduate student who works with professor Hyowon Lee in the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, presents her innovation on an automated opioid overdose reversal implant that is placed under the skin and delivers the antidote when respiratory failure is detected. (Purdue University image/Rebecca Wilcox) Download image

About Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization

The Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S. Services provided by this office support the economic development initiatives of Purdue University and benefit the university's academic activities. The office is managed by the Purdue Research Foundation, which received the 2016 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Innovation from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. For more information about funding and investment opportunities in startups based on a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Foundry at foundry@prf.org. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Office of Technology Commercialization at innovation@prf.org.

Purdue Research Foundation contact: Tom Coyne, 765-588-1044, tjcoyne@prf.org 
Source:
  Brooke Beier, 765-588-3464, blbeier@prf.org


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